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More record heat in the Southwest as storms target Plains

first_imgABC News(NEW YORK) — The Southwest likely will roast again on Thursday as severe weather settles into the Plains.Storms on Wednesday moved through the western Plains and Southeast, delivering damaging winds, large hail and flash flooding.In parts of South Carolina, as much as 5 inches of rain has fallen in the last 24 hours, with flooding north of Charleston. A local daycare facility had to be evacuated as wind gusts of up to 60 mph uprooted trees and knocked out power in Georgia as well. Baseball-sized hail was seen in Wyoming and Colorado.Thursday’s strongest storms again will be in the Plains, with areas from the Dakotas down to Kansas possibly seeing damaging winds, hail or isolated tornadoes.San Francisco on Wednesday reached a high of 94 degrees, shattering the city’s previous daily record of 85. Oakland also reached 94, also a record, and it was 100 in Napa.In Arizona, Yuma tied a record high at 115.Some areas of California desert could see 120 degrees on Thursday as Sacramento could reach 106.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Port Meadow graduate accommodation under threat

first_imgAlthough MacCulloch regretted the expenditure, he maintained that the fault lay with the University administration because of its initial failure to fulfil the planning conditions.He also argued that, though high, the initial expenditure of this motion would “restore the good name of the University in the city of Oxford and beyond… So much trust has been lost, so much anger generated – and that anger exists among potential benefactors to the University, who may turn away from further giving because of the Castle Mill affair.”Louis Trup, current OUSU president, expressed concerns about this route given the lack of housing for students with families. He argued that the huge costs of knocking down the top floors could lead to the demolition of the entire development, meaning the 300 graduate students who live in Castle Millwould need to find new housing.This would lead to an increase in students searching for rental properties, which, said Trup, “is likely to cause rent increases for private rentals in the city”.He added, “The members of OUSU note the concerns of the Save Port Meadow campaign, but believe that limited mitigation strategies that reduce the visual impact of the development can alleviate these concerns without having the negative impacts on students and tenants in Oxford that removing the top floor or demolishing castle mill presents.”Castle Mill resident Jemma Day agreed, arguing that she does not think Castle Mill is “that much of an eye sore” and that she found it hard to see how removing just one floor would make a significant difference.On MacCulloch’s motion, a University spokesperson commented, “The request will be considered carefully and in accordance with university regulations.” The motion will be debated in February. A motion has been put forward to the University Congregation, a body made up of 5,000 senior University figures, to knock down the top floors of Castle Mill following an Environment Impact Assessment.Castle Mill, an Oxford University graduate accommodation complex on Port Meadow, has been an ongoing source of controversy since planning permission was granted in February 2012. Many have been critical of the £21.5 million development, which blocks out Port Meadow’s famous view of Oxford’s ‘dreaming spires’.Notable figures such as Phillip Pullman have spoken out against the accommodation complex, calling it “destructive, brutal, ugly vandalism”.It has also had the dubious pleasure of being named one of the candidates for the 2013 Carbuncle Cup, the Building Design Online prize for the UK’s worst building.[mm-hide-text]%%IMG%%10815%%[/mm-hide-text]After a high court challenge in 2012, the University commissioned a retrospective Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA). The report found the buildings had a high “adverse impact” on Port Meadow, the Oxford skyline, theThames, and St Barnabas Church.It suggested three options to rectify this. The University has previously opted for option one – in essence, to camouflage the buildings. This latest motion to the University Congregation favours option three: removing the top floors. This is estimated to cost upwards of £12 million, removes 38 bedrooms and require all residents to vacate the buildings for a year. Diarmaid MacCulloch, Rev. Professor of the History of the Church at St Cross College and TV historian, who submitted the motion to the Congregation, argued, “A lot of money is going to be spent whatever option of remedying theenvironmental damage caused by the flats is adopted. What would be worst of all would be to adopt a minimal solution as the administration in Wellington Square wants, still spend a lot of money, and get very little result.”last_img read more

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New Robotic-Assisted Hip And Knee Surgery Now Offered At Ascension St. Vincent Orthopedic Hospital

first_img Ascension St. Vincent Orthopedic Hospital is the first hospital in Southern Indiana to offer patients an innovative approach to hip and knee replacements with potential for less pain and faster recovery timesWith the goal of helping patients achieve improved mobility and decreased pain during the activities they most enjoy, Ascension St. Vincent Orthopedic Hospital recently became the first hospital in Southern Indiana to offer robotic-arm assisted technology for hip and knee replacements – an innovative new approach for the way joint replacements are performed.While robotic-assisted approaches have been used for quite some time to address hernia repairs and the removal of gall bladders and cancerous tumors, this recent development marks a new application where robotic-arm assisted technology is now being used to help bring relief for patients experiencing hip and knee pain.Ascension St. Vincent Orthopedic Hospital is now proud to offer the robotic-arm assisted technology as an option to individuals seeking a total hip replacement, total knee replacement, and partial knee replacement.How does this robotic-arm assisted technology work for hip and knee replacements?Surgeon-controlled system. With this system, the orthopedic surgeon remains in control of the robotic-arm during the entire procedure. A virtual boundary provides tactile resistance to help the surgeon stay within the boundaries defined in the patient’s surgical plan.Tailormade approach for each patient. This robotic-arm assisted system uses patient-specific data from CT scans in advance of an operation to develop a three-dimensional pre-operative plan and tailormade implant alignment and positioning unique to each patient’s anatomy.Detailed feedback for precise results. The system provides detailed, real-time feedback to the surgeon during the operation, which helps to enhance surgical precision.What are the potential patient benefits of this new robot-assisted approach? Patients may experience the benefits of:Improved surgical outcomesLess post-operative painFaster recoveryGreater precision in alignment and placement of joint implantMore “natural” joint movementImproved joint flexibility and implant durabilityLower incidence of follow-up surgeries FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Michigan City man killed after being struck by vehicle on U.S. 12

first_img Google+ By Jon Zimney – February 6, 2021 0 357 IndianaLocalNews Michigan City man killed after being struck by vehicle on U.S. 12 Google+ Pinterest (95.3 MNC) A Michigan City man died after being struck by a car.The collision happened just after 10 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 5, in the 3500 block of E. U.S. 12.First responders attempted life-saving measures on Raymond Gaston, 57, who they found unresponsive on the pavement, but he died at the scene.Police say Gaston was struck when he tried to remove an animal carcass from the highway.The driver, Parker DePalma, 20, of Michigan City, was arrested on a preliminary charge of driving while intoxicated. Twitter WhatsApp Facebook Previous articleBitter cold air, more snow for the weekendNext articleNorth Liberty man killed, several others injured in crash near Crumstown Highway Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. Facebook Pinterest WhatsApp Twitterlast_img read more

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Sainsbury’s leads the way by scrapping multi-buys

first_imgSainsbury’s has become the first of the major supermarkets to commit to phasing out multi-buy deals, after mounting evidence that shoppers find them confusing and misleading. Multi-buys, such as two-for-one deals, will be scrapped by the supermarket in favour of lower prices. The majority of Sainsbury’s buy-one-get-one-free (BOGOF) deals will be terminated by August, and the process of eliminating them will start next month.Paul Mills-Hicks, Sainsbury’s food commercial director, said: “Customer shopping habits have changed significantly in recent years, with people shopping more frequently, often seeking to buy what they need at that moment.“Our customers have told us that multi-buy promotions don’t meet their shopping needs today, are often confusing and create challenges at home in terms of storage and waste.”The announcement comes as the government’s competition watchdog prepares to issue a new pricing rulebook to retailers, designed to ensure shoppers are not misled.last_img read more

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Foo Fighters Welcome John Travolta & Billy Idol At Welcome To Rockville [Video]

first_imgOn Sunday night, Foo Fighters were in Jacksonville, Florida, rounding out  the Welcome To Rockville festival with a headlining performance. The band, led by Dave Grohl, is no stranger to inviting out surprise special guests during their performances, ranging from, most recently, the viral sensation, “Kiss Guy”, to Rick Astley to Dave Grohl’s young daughter, who sat in on drums during a show in Iceland.During the band’s headlining Welcome To Rockville show, Foo Fighters had two very special guests line up for surprise appearances—John Travolta and Billy Idol. Travolta was watching Foo Fighters’ set from the side stage when Foo Fighters moved into a cover of the Grease classic “You’re The One That I Want”, a tune made famous by Travolta and Olivia Newton-John. After the out-of-left-field cover, Travolta emerged briefly to give Grohl a hug.Later on, Billy Idol also made an appearance—this time for a more extensive cameo. Idol and Foo Fighters laid out a rendition of John Lennon’s “Gimme Some Truth” before Idol departed from the stage to let the Foo Fighters wrap up the show. You can watch a number of videos from the star-studded performance below. [H/T Consequence of Sound]last_img read more

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Tannenbaum safety

first_imgUniversity of Georgia To keep your family and home safe this holiday season, take a few precautions when it comes to your Christmas tree. • Always turn off all lights on trees and decorations before you go to bed or leave the house. • Make sure you place your tree away from fireplaces, radiators and other heat sources. • Check your Christmas lights for broken or cracked sockets, frayed or bare wires or loose connections. Replace or repair any damaged light sets. • Use no more than three light sets on one extension cord. Extension cords should also be placed against the wall to avoid tripping hazards. • Never place lit candles on a tree or near any flammable materials. • Avoid placing breakable tree ornaments or ones with small, detachable parts on lower branches where small children or pets can reach them. – From the National Safety Councillast_img read more

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The Sneak

first_imgPlaying sports is an all-out, action-packed adrenaline rush. Watching sports isn’t quite as dramatic. Sure, the occasional foul ball gives us a chance to be heroes, but for the most part, being a spectator is pretty tame. There’s not much risk in buying a ticket and filing through the turnstiles.Unless, of course, you try to sneak into the stadium. It requires risk, athleticism, and ingenuity, much like the sports you come to watch.Let me be clear about one thing: I’ve never, ever run bandit in a race or not paid my entry fees for any event. I only sneak in to watch overpaid professional athletes in giant stadiums, and I do it solely for the challenge. It’s a way of turning a normally sedentary, passive activity into an athletic, active one.My sneak-ins started in 1995, when the Atlanta Braves were about to win their first (and only) World Series. I was in college at the time, and I couldn’t afford a stadium hot dog, much less a $1,000 ticket to the Series. So I headed down to the stadium for the final game, hoping to catch some tailgate parties. I had never witnessed a World Series championship, and I at least wanted to be near the peanut shells and spilled-beer smells of the stadium when it happened.It was a chilly, windy October evening. For the first few innings, I circled the stadium with thousands of other fans, who were holding up one, two, or three fingers, indicating how many tickets they were seeking. I tried waving a finger for a few laps. No luck.I kept walking in circles. It was getting really cold. I was ready to head back and watch the rest of the game at the bar when, suddenly, I saw my ticket inside. Beside Gate E, a television station had propped a hydraulic lift cherry picker against the stadium. Its mechanical arm, bent at the elbow, had a platform fist at the top, and the stadium ramps were right across from the platform. It was asking to be climbed. But the lift was only 20 yards from a ticket gate guarded by three security officers. I scouted out their movements and summoned up courage for another half-inning.Just as I was approaching the lift, a homeless guy with a scraggly yellow beard shuffled over to me, carrying a bottle of whiskey in a paper sack. I was expecting him to ask for money, but instead he raised his eyebrows and said, “You gonna climb it?”I nodded my head, and a wide, toothless grin spread across his face.“I’ll see what I can do ‘bout them security guards,” he said.He stumbled over to the gate and fell down, feigning injury. The guards reached down to move him out of the way. In an instant, I shimmied up the lift’s arm, grabbed the edge of the platform like a chin-up bar, and kicked my body to the top. Then I jumped across the two-foot gap that separated the platform from the stadium. I couldn’t believe it was me—college-educated, law-abiding me—climbing two stories in the air onto a wobbly platform so that I could illegally vault into a stadium.Suddenly, I heard a shout below. The guards were running up the stadium ramp. I sprinted away and disappeared into the crowd. A few minutes later, I was even lucky enough to find an empty seat in the nosebleeds, just in time to watch David Justice’s series-winning homer clear the right field fence.My toughest sneak-in challenge was the Super Bowl. I managed to see my hometown St. Louis Rams squeak past the Tennessee Titans at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta.St. Louis never had a winning football season when I was growing up, but my dad and I religiously checked the standings every Monday morning and memorized back-page statistics on all the players. He took me to the stadium after home games so that I could get players’ autographs. We suffered through years of cellar-dweller seasons together. Now, St. Louis had finally turned things around and was going to the Super Bowl for the first time.I arrived at the Georgia Dome wearing a tie and sports jacket, and carrying a clipboard with some blank sheets of paper. I caught the door behind a media crew and crept into the building adjacent to the Dome. Inside, halftime bands were tuning their instruments.There was only one corridor between the building and the Dome: an outdoor walkway lined by at least 50 cops and security guards. They stood in two parallel rows and checked each person entering and exiting the Dome. It didn’t look like I could get any farther.Then I heard a faint hymn echoing through the parking deck above the walkway. It grew louder and more powerful. Walking down from the deck were 100 black women from the Georgia Mass Choir singing the praises of God.Divine intervention.I mixed myself in with the choir—a skinny, white boy surrounded by a sea of big blue robes—and pretended to be a manager escorting them through the security lines. I smiled, tried to look important, and never, ever made eye contact with a security guard. We passed through the last security post and walked through the ground-level doors to the Dome.I was in.The choir was headed straight onto the field for their pre-game performance. I was wedged in with them, headed for the field. I started to panic. For a second, I felt like The Naked Gun’s Frank Drebin about to impersonate Enrico Palazzo singing the national anthem. But I stepped aside at the mouth of the tunnel and ducked into a service elevator. I rode with three already-drunk beer vendors up to the stands.I watched the game from an empty usher’s seat near the Rams’ goal line where Mike Jones would make his last-second, game-saving tackle on the one yard line. Afterward, I called my dad from the stadium. He could barely hear my voice amid the buzz of the electrified crowd.“Can you believe it, Dad?”“I don’t know what is more incredible: St. Louis winning a Super Bowl or you sneaking in to see it.”My dad—a lifelong police officer—had never been more proud of his son.last_img read more

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Panels to work on amendment process, independence issues

first_img January 1, 2005 Senior Editor Regular News Panels to work on amendment process, independence issues Panels to work on amendment process, independence issues Gary Blankenship Senior Editor The Bar will be taking a careful look at how the state constitution is amended and judicial independence with two new committees approved by the Board of Governors.The board, at its December 10 meeting, approved the recommendation of the Program Evaluation Committee to create the Special Board Committee on Judicial Independence, sought by Bar President Kelly Overstreet Johnson, and the Special Board Committee to Study the Florida Constitutional Amendment Process, sought by President-elect Alan Bookman.The judicial independence committee will “consider various methods of strengthening Florida’s judiciary and maintaining its independence, including but not limited to possible changes in state constitutional or statutory law,” Johnson said in a memo to the board.“Among specific issues of likely consideration, I would hope that this group would explore potential changes in the composition and appointment of our state’s judicial nominating commissions, money raising options to endorse candidates supporting judicial independence, as well as other reforms.”Johnson said while she hopes the committee can finish its work before her term ends in June, there’s a good chance it will require more time.The chair is board member Jesse Diner, and other members are board members Gwynne Young, vice chair, Ervin Gonzalez, Kim Bald, Jay White, Chris Lombardo, Greg Parker, Henry Latimer, Scott Hawkins, and Mayanne Downs.The action on the constitutional amendment committee came after the board had a discussion at its October meeting about whether the Florida Constitution is being degraded by numerous initiative petitions on topics ranging from gambling to care of pregnant pigs to high-speed rail systems.“It has obviously been a concern to the Bar and the legislative and executive branches,” Bookman said. “We need to study this issue, and we need to see if any changes need to be made.“We need to protect citizens’ right to participate, but the constitution is our founding document and it needs to be protected from unnecessary changes.”As an example, Bookman noted that voters approved in 2000 a constitutional amendment requiring the state to build a bullet train linking major cities, and then repealed it in 2004.He said the committee will likely look at allowing citizens to enact statutes by initiative, something they now cannot do, while making the constitutional amendment process more restrictive. He also said the panel would look at proposed legislation, including two bills already filed in the Senate. One of those would limit citizen amendment initiatives to issues affecting basic human rights, and the other would require a 60 percent passage rate for amendments.The committee, Bookman said, hopefully will work with the legislative, executive, and judicial branches, as well as the public and business interests to seek a common ground.The panel will be chaired by board member Harold Melville. Other members are public member Blair Culpepper, who will be vice chair, and board members Nancy Gregoire, Scott Hawkins, Chris Lombardo, Ross Goodman, Grier Wells, and Larry Sellers. Bookman said he hopes the committee can have its final report by August.last_img read more

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The 4 easiest ways to budget: which helps you most?

first_img 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by: Paula PantBudgeting strikes fear (or annoyance, or disgust) into the hearts of many people, because we tend to see budgeting as something that is tedious, is complicated and keeps us from having any form. But budgeting doesn’t have to be a dirty word. Here are four ways to make budgeting as easy and painless as possible.1. Automate ItTo make room for savings in your budget, pay yourself first. Set up automatic deductions from your checking to your savings account each pay period so you’re not tempted to spend money you’ve earmarked for your emergency fund or retirement goals.To avoid late fees and having to keep track of numerous due dates, set up automatic payments for as many bills as you can. The amount due will be deducted straight from your bank account when it’s due, and you won’t need to worry about mailing anything out by a certain date.Remove the potential for human error as much as possible, and you’ll find budgeting is already a lot easier. continue reading »last_img read more