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Managers under the spotlight as survey uncovers knowledge gaps

first_imgSenior European executives and managers will be the subject of aninvestigation into the generational differences among organisational leaders. The study – Emerging Leaders: Revolution, Evolution or Status Quo – run bythe Center for Creative Leadership (CCL) is the second phase of a globalresearch programme. Phase one looked at values and behaviour among three generations of managersand leaders, mainly in the US. Though some real differences emerged – older people are more likely to bemarried and higher up in organisational hierarchies – there were manysimilarities. Almost all the sample in phase one believed they were contributing to societyin their current jobs, trusted their organi- sation to keep its promises andbelieved that they would be developed as employees. However, the younger the respondent the stronger the belief that you shouldonly stay at an organisation for as long as it was personally useful. Youngerrespondents also believed that career advancement within a company was based onskill at office politics. The research also revealed that younger managers are also more likely toexpress difficulty in working with or managing people from older generations. CCL project leader Jennifer Deal said: “The findings of phase onereveal that many deeply held beliefs are based on myths. Values, such asrespect and ambition, seem to be the same across generations, but the way thosevalues are demonstrated may be very different.” Kim Lafferty, UK manager for CCL, said understanding the generationaldifferences could help companies and other organisations plan for succession,retain valued employees and provide the most effective training. For further details and to participate in the research project, visit thewebsite.  http://eleaders.ccl.orgBy Mike Berry Comments are closed. Managers under the spotlight as survey uncovers knowledge gapsOn 20 Apr 2004 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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Property licensing tracker proptech firm wins £500,000 investment

first_imgHome » News » Property licensing tracker proptech firm wins £500,000 investment previous nextProptechProperty licensing tracker proptech firm wins £500,000 investmentGetRentr receives financial backing from London lettings agency, leading City investment firm and several private investors.Nigel Lewis13th April 201801,280 Views A proptech startup that enables letting agents to track PRS licensing regulations and council consultations in England has received £500,000 from several investors including – as we reported earlier this week – lettings firm LiFE Residential.GetRentr has recently been selected to join an Ordnance Survey and HM Land Registry initiative to support innovation in property data, and has also hooked up with the National Landlords’ Association.Further deals with ‘major industry players’ are also in the pipeline, says GetRentr.The £500,000 cash injection into the proptech platform includes funds from investment firm EPIC Private Equity LLP, several private investors as well as LiFE Ventures.GetRentr says its platform enables agents to manage portfolios across London and further afield even if properties fall within different licensing schemes. It does this by flagging up regulatory and consultation changes and ensuring the properties meet the local required standard.Only a few years ago GetRentr’s purpose would have been limited, with only a handful of licensing schemes in operation, whereas now over 530 exist within many of the UK’s key urban areas.“At GetRentr our vision is to raise the standards of rented accommodation through the innovative use of data and technology, whilst also offering letting agents and landlords significant savings and revenue opportunities by automating complex, error-­prone compliance processes,” says CEO Orla Shields (pictured, left).“Our pioneering data and technology platform delivers transparency, measurable impact and strong stakeholder returns – things which will set us apart in terms of our ability to recruit the best talent, scale the business globally and enjoy sustainable success.”Landlord licensing property licensing GetRentr Orla Shields EPIC Private Equity LLP April 13, 2018Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more

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ASSISTANT PROFESSOR IN NUTRITIONAL SCIENCES

first_imgMinimum Years and Type of Relevant Work Experience: Employment Class: A074600-COL OF AG & LIFE SCIENCES/NUTRITIONAL SCIENCES UW-Madison invites applicants for a full time, 9-month, tenuretrack faculty member at the rank of Assistant Professor in theDepartment of Nutritional Sciences. This newly-created position issupported by the Dairy Innovation Hub in the College ofAgricultural and Life Sciences. The Hub is an exciting newinitiative at three of the leading UW agricultural schools(UW-Madison, UW-Platteville, and UW-River Falls) and fosters dairyresearch, education and outreach in the priority areas ofStewarding Land & Water Resources, Ensuring Animal Health &Welfare, Growing Farm Businesses & Communities, and EnrichingHuman Health and Nutrition. The position will support the”Enriching Human Health and Nutrition” priority area, and will havea tenure home within the Department of Nutritional Sciences. Thevision for this priority area is to elucidate novel links betweenmilk components and human health leading to new dairy product(s)for individuals across the human life cycle consistent with”personalized nutrition”. The position carries a commitment to thethree functions of research, instruction, outreach, and service, aswell as professional and university service as appropriate to theposition and rank. Additionally, as a Hub-supported position, thefaculty member will also have the opportunity to collaborate withother Hub researchers, pursue Hub funding opportunities, andparticipate in Hub programs. For more information on the DairyInnovation Hub ( https://dairyinnovationhub.wisc.edu/)and UW-Madison CALS Hub efforts ( https://cals.wisc.edu/dairy-innovation-hub/)please visit the websites. Additional Information: Institutional Statement on Diversity: AUGUST 23, 2021 Ongoing/Renewable Applications Open: Dec 23 2020 Central Standard TimeApplications Close: Job no: 225850-FAWork type: Faculty-Full TimeDepartment: CALS/NUTRITIONAL SCIENCESLocation: MadisonCategories: Agricultural, Animal, Biological and LifeSciences, Food Science, Nutritional Science Degree and Area of Specialization: Full Time: 100% Contact information for three references is required. Referenceswill be contacted to submit a letter of recommendation afterinitial screening has occurred.For questions on the application process, contact Todd Schry inCALS Human Resources, [email protected], 608-890-1677.Direct all questions pertaining to the position to Bill Omdahl inthe Department of Nutritional Sciences, [email protected],(608) 262-2887.Review of applications will begin April 1, 2021; however, theposition will remain open and applications may be considered untilthe position is filled. NegotiableACADEMIC (9 months) Contact: Official Title: 225850-FA ASSISTANT PROFESSOR(C40NN) Viable candidates will demonstrate a record of or potential for 1)individual and collaborative extramural grantsmanship (e.g., NIH,USDA, NSF) with publications in impactful journals; 2)undergraduate teaching; 3) support for education within a graduateprogram; 4) contribution to outreach, extension and servicefunctions of the Department, College, University and professionalsocieties; and 5) promoting an inclusive and diverse climate withinour campus and associated communities. Anticipated Begin Date:center_img The incumbent will perform research, teaching, and outreach intheir area of expertise in ways that are relevant to dairyagriculture and related fields.The successful candidate will be expected to develop a nationallycompetitive research program in the multidisciplinary area ofnutrition and health, with focus on dairy and its components. Thesuccessful candidate will have expertise in conducting clinicalhuman feeding studies to explore mechanisms involving physiologic,metabolic, or immunologic impacts of dairy products through thelifespan. The candidate will work independently and also within acollaborative research team to support the mission of the DairyInnovation Hub.The position will teach undergraduate and graduate courses innutritional sciences. Teaching responsibilities will becommensurate with college expectations and consistent with theteaching loads of other departmental faculty.The individual will be expected to facilitate interdisciplinaryefforts and collaborative efforts within the Department of Animaland Dairy Sciences, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, andfederal labs. cover letter;CV;statement of research accomplishments/future goals (3 pagelimit);a combined statement of teaching interests and philosophy (1page) and statement of diversity philosophy ( https://diversity.wisc.edu/) (asone PDF);electronic reprints of up to three recent articles (as onePDF). Apply online at “Jobs at UW” ( http://jobs.wisc.edu ) under job number225850. Applications must be received through UW Madison’s onlineapplication system.To begin the application process, please click on “”.Applicants should upload as separate documents: Diversity is a source of strength, creativity, and innovation forUW-Madison. We value the contributions of each person and respectthe profound ways their identity, culture, background, experience,status, abilities, and opinion enrich the university community. Wecommit ourselves to the pursuit of excellence in teaching,research, outreach, and diversity as inextricably linkedgoals.The University of Wisconsin-Madison fulfills its public mission bycreating a welcoming and inclusive community for people from everybackground – people who as students, faculty, and staff serveWisconsin and the world.For more information on diversity and inclusion on campus, pleasevisit: http://diversity.wisc.edu”>Diversity and Inclusion Salary: The UW-Madison College of Agricultural and Life Sciences iscommitted to maintaining and growing a culture that embracesdiversity, inclusion and equity, believing that these values arefoundational elements of our excellence and fundamental componentsof a positive and enriching learning and working environment forall students, faculty and staff.UW-Madison is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. Wepromote excellence through diversity and encourage all qualifiedindividuals to apply.A criminal background check will be conducted prior tohiring. Bill [email protected] Access (WTRS): 7-1-1 (out-of-state: TTY: 800.947.3529, STS:800.833.7637) and above Phone number (See http://www.wisconsinrelay.com/”>RELAY_SERVICE for further information. ) Job Number: Faculty Instructions to Applicants: Work Type: PhD in Nutritional Sciences or aligned fields Appointment Type, Duration: Department(s): Principal Duties: The University of Wisconsin-Madison is engaged in a Title and TotalCompensation (TTC) Project to redesign job titles and compensationstructures. As a result of the TTC project, official job titles oncurrent job postings may change in Fall 2020. Job duties andresponsibilities will remain the same. For more information pleasevisit: https://hr.wisc.edu/title-and-total-compensation-study/”> https://hr.wisc.edu/title-and-total-compensation-study/.Employment will require a criminal background check. It will alsorequire you and your references to answer questions regardingsexual violence and sexual harassment.The University of Wisconsin System will not reveal the identitiesof applicants who request confidentiality in writing, except thatthe identity of the successful candidate will be released. See Wis.Stat. sec. 19.36(7).The https://jobs.wisc.edu/asr”>Annual Security and Fire Safety Report contains current campussafety and disciplinary policies, crime statistics for the previous3 calendar years, and on-campus student housing fire safetypolicies and fire statistics for the previous 3 calendar years.UW-Madison will provide a paper copy upon request; please contactthe University ofWisconsin Police Department . The University of Wisconsin is an Equal Opportunity andAffirmative Action Employer. We promote excellence throughdiversity and encourage all qualified individuals to apply.If you need to request an accommodation because of a disability,you can find information about how to make a request at thefollowing website: https://employeedisabilities.wisc.edu/disability-accommodation-information-for-applicants/”> https://employeedisabilities.wisc.edu/disability-accommodation-information-for-applicants/ Position Summary:last_img read more

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Daycare Centers Sought for Children of Essential Employees

first_imgDaycare centers will have to apply to the state for approval to remain open past April 1. (Photo courtesy of Wiki Commons)  An executive order by Gov. Phil Murphy is going to close daycare centers on April 1 throughout New Jersey unless the daycare will exclusively service children of “essential employees.”Paperwork must be filed with the state immediately if the daycare is attempting to stay open. The Executive Order 110 reads: “Any ‘child care center,’ including those as defined in this executive order, that fails to timely certify shall be closed to the public as of Wednesday, April 1, 2020, and remain closed through the school closure period.” The Cape May County Office of Emergency Management wanted to ensure local daycares have access to the form because of the importance of keeping local daycares open for essential employees during the coronavirus outbreak.  The link to the application is: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe3ElMPAsWND13XPDDMLaEOYnTX3V1iiXr9p6yekvL2suiYNA/viewform Some of the essential employees that are outlined in the executive order include, but are not limited to, first responders, health care workers, essential government employees, social services workers and workers of essential retail operations.last_img read more

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Need a Cake warns small firms of discount offers

first_imgA Reading bakery has spoken out about its involvement with online discount voucher website Groupon, warning other small businesses to steer clear of such enticing promotional offers.Need a Cake ran an offer with the US-based company to offer bargain-hunting customers the opportunity to purchase 12 custom-made cupcakes for £6.50, a 75% discount on its normal retailing price of £26. Rachel Brown, the small bakery firm’s owner, was inundated with around 5,600 orders, and was unable to fulfill all transactions. As a result, the business made a loss of up to £3 per batch of cupcakes, while forking out an additional £12,500 to hire 25 agency staff and fund additional distribution to cope with the high order demand.Steve Consalvez, a spokesman for Need a Cake and business trouble shooter, warned similar small bakery firms and start-up companies not to be drawn in by such discount offers as a way of promotion: “The Groupon voucher made no impact on the business other than cost it money. Prior to running the offer, Need a Cake was at a 30% increase in profits in the first year, but we are now back on track.“Small businesses might not understand their own resources, plus they don’t ask enough questions about areas for potential problems with such discount voucher offers. I’m concerned other businesses might get into the same situation as Need a Cake, discounting prices heavily and gaining the wrong type of customers who won’t come back for repeat business.“The processes behind such discount voucher websites don’t support the partner and, as a result, the end customer suffers. This needs to change.” Groupon is now being investigated by the Office of Fair Trading (OFT) after breaching the Advertising Standards Agency (ASA) code and breaking UK ad regulations 48 times in 11 months.The advertising watchdog has made 11 formal rulings of code breaches against Groupon that have been published, with a further 37 informal breaches that the ASA has addressed without making any details public.Consalvez added: “If businesses want to make sure they are going to benefit from doing such promotional activity with discount voucher websites, the owners really need to be asking questions, such as ‘What if we sell all the vouchers and the majority of customers want to claim it on the first day?’“Need a Cake is now looking forward since the Groupon deal. We have moved to new premises, which are quadruple the size of the existing location. We have also taken on two new members of staff, with hopes of further expanding the team in 2012.”last_img read more

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Q&A with Harvard’s Title IX officer

first_imgWith the release of the first University-wide Title IX policy and procedures, the Gazette recently sat down with Harvard’s Title IX officer, Mia Karvonides, to discuss the changes and what they mean for the University’s efforts to protect community members and prevent sexual harassment — including sexual violence — related to gender, sexual orientation, or gender identity.GAZETTE: Can you summarize briefly the most important aspects of the new University-wide policy and procedures?KARVONIDES: The first thing to recognize is that, while Harvard is made up of multiple Schools, we are one community at the end of the day. Our responsibility is to protect all students, all faculty, all staff, affiliates, and visitors from discrimination, and from the task at hand, sexual harassment. With that in mind, the new policy looks at the whole array of sexual harassment — from one severe incident like a rape to persistent or pervasive harassment. And we’re looking at it as a community, how it impacts all members of one community.The most important change is that we are creating a new office, the Office for Sexual and Gender-Based Dispute Resolution, or ODR, to investigate sexual misconduct complaints against students, ranging from persistent or pervasive harassment in a lab environment, for instance, to a rape. As a central office, the ODR will serve the entire Harvard community and will be staffed by expert investigators. It will also work in close coordination with the involved Schools. The new office will create a new level of continuity and consistency.Investigators will interview witnesses, review the evidence, make findings of fact using the “preponderance of the evidence” standard, determine whether there has been a violation of the policy, and turn their reports over to the individual School disciplinary panels.GAZETTE: What role will the Schools play?KARVONIDES: I think the role of the Schools is critical. They will be engaged at every step along the way. For instance, they’ll have the opportunity to have their designee involved as part of the investigative team. A School’s Title IX coordinator will be involved with putting in place supports and other interim measures to assist the affected person and possibly the broader community, pending the outcome of the investigation. And they will also be updated as we go through every stage of an investigation. Also, the Schools will continue to make any disciplinary decisions with the benefit of the report from the professional investigators.GAZETTE: When do the new policy and procedures take effect?KARVONIDES: At the start of this upcoming school year.GAZETTE: Now that you’ve created this new, University-wide policy and procedures, what work is left for the Schools to do? For instance, what is the FAS committee chaired by Professor Alison Johnson working on?KARVONIDES: The next step, which includes the committee at the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) chaired by Alison Johnson, is to apply the new University policy and procedures to each of the individual Harvard Schools. Each School has a different process for doing that. Professor Johnson, for example, leads a committee of faculty, students, and staff. Ultimately, the FAS policies and procedures — including the student and other handbooks — must be adapted to work with the University-wide policy. That is true of every School.GAZETTE: What policy applies between the beginning of the new term and the completion of the work at the Schools?KARVONIDES: At the beginning of the new term, the new policy applies for all faculty, students, and staff, and the new procedures will apply for complaints against any student across the University. Schools are working hard to update their policies and procedures into line as quickly as possible. We believe it is important for our community that we move forward in time for the new academic year.GAZETTE: Why didn’t the University adopt an affirmative-consent standard?KARVONIDES: Our overarching commitment is to protect all members of our community from discrimination based on sex. The standard we’ve adopted is that of unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature, which is consistent with the standard in all federal civil rights laws that apply in an education setting, including Title IX. It also makes sense given the range of conduct reached by the policy, which goes beyond sexual assaults and prohibits other forms of gender-based harassment.In our policy, we talk about how you determine if it is unwelcomed conduct. There’s more in the policy to elaborate, but essentially conduct is unwelcome if a person did not request or invite it and regarded the conduct as undesirable or offensive. We believe we should have a standard designed to protect our community from all types of gender-based discrimination, even if the behavior isn’t criminal.GAZETTE: But many advocates say that Harvard is one of the only universities among its peers that doesn’t have affirmative consent.KARVONIDES: That is likely impossible to say because there is no standard definition of affirmative consent. The closest any college comes to a defined affirmative-consent approach is Antioch College. Under their policy, consent is given step by step at every point of engagement during an intimate encounter. You must verbally ask and verbally get an answer for every point of engagement. “May I kiss you? May I undo your blouse?” Etc.GAZETTE: Do any of Harvard’s peers share Antioch College’s definition of affirmative consent?KARVONIDES: Probably not in the pure sense of what Antioch has adopted. Each of our peers uses different standards. Again, that’s part of the problem. There is no one definition of affirmative consent that folks reference when they make statements about who does or doesn’t have affirmative consent.GAZETTE: Has the legal landscape governing sexual misconduct at colleges changed in recent years?KARVONIDES: Definitely. In 1997, the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights — which everyone calls by its acronym, OCR — first issued sexual harassment guidance, explaining what the obligations are for an institution to comply with Title IX in terms of preventing and responding to incidents of harassment in their communities. That guidance document went through the formal rulemaking process. That 1997 guidance was later revised via another rulemaking process and reissued in 2001. To date, the 2001 guidance is the only guidance from the Office for Civil Rights — the only agency charged with interpreting Title IX — that has gone through that rulemaking process and is still in effect.The reason that matters is because regulations issued only after broad and formal input has been solicited are given more legal deference and are generally assumed to more fully take into account the full range of complexities. Obviously, we give the statutes the highest level of deference, but the next is something that has gone through the rule-making process. So that’s important to keep in mind.In 2011, the Office for Civil Rights issued further guidance in a “Dear Colleague” letter that zeroed in on higher education and peer sexual assaults. The “Dear Colleague” letter specifically references the 2001 guidance, saying “We’re not going beyond. We’re not issuing new law. We’re just providing more clarification on that 2001 guidance.”Finally, in March 2013, Congress reauthorized the Violence Against Women Act [VAWA] and, for the first time, included a new section that focused on campus sexual violence. This new legislation created stipulations for how colleges must conduct discipline when gender violence is at issue. What’s tricky is that these new stipulations are a direct overlay to the prescriptive Title IX requirements when we are handling these very same types of cases. It also included new mandates related to training and the types of information we provide students, faculty, and staff. That law is going through the later stages of the rulemaking process now, with new regulations anticipated in the next year.GAZETTE: How has this changing legal landscape affected the way you’ve approached the development of the new policy and procedures? It seems like a bit of a moving target.KARVONIDES: Reconciling the different actions by Congress as well as the OCR has been challenging enough. In addition to these legal and regulatory changes, however, President Obama created an advisory task force earlier this year to study campus sexual assault and issue a report with recommendations.The task force completed its work and in April issued its “Not Alone” report. While we take their recommendations very seriously, they don’t carry the weight of either law or regulation, and don’t come from the regulating agency, OCR. So, as we formulated the new policy, we looked first at the law, including the changes created by the reauthorization of VAWA. We then looked at the 2001 OCR guidance, the only Title IX guidance that has gone through rulemaking. And finally, we looked at other guidance, including the “Dear Colleague” letter and the more-recent recommendations coming out of Washington.GAZETTE: What do you think about the growing national attention on the issue of sexual assault on college campuses?KARVONIDES: I think it’s great. When I went to college in the 1980s there was a lot of apathy among students, at least on my campus. There was not a lot of activism. I came from a family where there was a lot of activism, and when I went to college I was expecting to be engaged with my peers. But while I did get involved, I felt somewhat like an outsider on my campus. I am very encouraged and excited that students are organized and engaged and that they want to understand these issues and they want to understand what Title IX is all about.Frankly what I’m very impressed by is their incredible use of social media for their activism. I feel like I and others could probably benefit a lot from studying how they’ve been networking, and students from across the country are helping each other with looking at their own campuses, filing OCR complaints, reporting those who have experienced sexual assault. I think that’s great. Any day, I would rather have students who are active, frankly, and advocating for change, than silent.But I do hope that students, in their activism, find ways to engage with members of the community who may have differing opinions.Since I have been here, I have had an open-door policy. I have had students who have come to me directly, sometimes to talk about an instance that may have occurred a few years ago, sometimes to talk about something that has happened more recently, and other times because this is an issue that’s a concern to them, and they want to share their views. Those conversations have meant a lot to me as I have been doing my work.GAZETTE: What will success look like?KARVONIDES: If we are successful, we will be raising awareness of what it means to be a member of the Harvard community and how people should treat one another.  Together with a prompt and effective response to allegations, the new policy and procedures should contribute to the broader University efforts to reduce the incidence of sexual misconduct.  This does not mean that the number of reported cases will necessarily decline.  As the community’s confidence in our efforts increases, we very much hope that people who might not have come forward in the past will feel more comfortable doing so now.  We’re already seeing encouraging signs of that.GAZETTE: What would you say to a member of the community who believes the new policy and procedures don’t hit the mark exactly right?KARVONIDES: I will welcome every conversation with students, either groups of students or students individually. I want to hear their thoughts, their concerns, where they feel the policy is too limited or too expansive, and I’d like to explore it with them.There will be opportunities to speak with me and to speak with their Title IX coordinators in their respective Schools. At the end of the day, when someone is concerned about a policy, they are often concerned about how it is applied. There’s some work that we can do, and I hope we can do well, in developing tools to demonstrate how the language from the policy is applied to real-life situations. If your respective School has a committee or a group of leaders working on this issue, such as the committee at the FAS, you should certainly talk with them directly.GAZETTE: You sent the policies to the Office for Civil Rights in April. Have you heard back?KARVONIDES: Unfortunately, we have not yet received feedback on the substance of the policy and the procedures. But we want to have the policy and procedures in place when students return. We want to have everyone ready to implement the new policy, to communicate it to students, to have the procedures up and running, and to have ODR — the new investigation office — operational. We’re at a point where we risk not being prepared when the students return if we do not act now.GAZETTE: Going forward, whom should students, faculty, and staff call if they have an incident or problem to report?KARVONIDES: There are four primary places someone can go: the new Office for Dispute Resolution, the Title IX coordinator at your School, the Office of Sexual Assault Prevention and Response, and the Harvard University Police Department. Of those, only the Office of Sexual Assault Prevention and Response provides an entirely confidential process. The other resources are private, but they may be obligated to take action to address an ongoing threat, for instance, or to get you help. Let’s take them one by one.For Harvard students, regardless of what School you’re at, the new centralized office — the Office for Dispute Resolution, or ODR — is a resource for you. You can come to ODR for information to ask questions and better understand the protections under the policy and/or what options may be available if you have a concern. [You can go there] for an informal resolution process because you’ve had an incident (other than a sexual assault, for which an informal resolution is not permitted by OCR), or because you’re experiencing persistent, pervasive harassment, and you prefer to explore an informal resolution. Last, ODR is the only place where you will be filing complaints if you’re a student.Students, as well as faculty and staff, can also go to the Title IX coordinators at their School. Title IX coordinators receive ongoing training, are neutral parties, and are committed to protecting all members of our community from sexual discrimination. You may have a concern about something that has happened to you, regardless if you are student, faculty, or staff. Or you may have observed something or heard of an incident that has occurred for someone else in the community. We really encourage you to go to your Title IX coordinator and have a conversation. Oftentimes, a Title IX coordinator is first approached by a concerned friend or other member of the community. Either way, a Title IX coordinator can help you with interim measures — the support you need to continue your studies and continue to participate in all aspects of what Harvard has to offer you as a student. And, also, your Title IX coordinator can help you understand what a complaint process might look like and help you with accessing ODR for filing a complaint.The Office of Sexual Assault Prevention and Response, OSAPR for short, is the primary confidential resource for students here at Harvard. It’s very important that students have a place where they can talk to someone, knowing that whatever is said is not going to leave that room, and oftentimes, that opens up into a conversation at a much deeper level. Other confidential resources include Bureau of Study Council clinicians, clergy, and medical or mental health professionals. But OSAPR is staffed by trained rape counselors, and is there to believe what you tell them and to work with you to get you the support you need, no questions asked.Finally, HUPD [Harvard University Police Department] is another critical resource. Some of the underlying conduct that we’re talking about is criminal as well as being discriminatory. Any member of the community can, and I would encourage them to, call HUPD to get help, and to, if they choose, file a criminal complaint.At the recommendation of the task force created by President Faust this spring, we are already working to create a website that will centralize information about these resources in one place.GAZETTE: Before you came to Harvard, you were at OCR’s Boston office. How did you get into this line of work?KARVONIDES: I was at OCR for five years before coming to Harvard. I consider myself a civil rights and education law attorney. That’s the way I identify who I am, what I do.When I was at OCR, I was investigating complaints of discrimination based on all of the federal civil rights laws, based on race, color, national origin, disability, and sex. I led two significant harassment investigations of educational institutions, trying to determine whether there was a hostile environment. We found violations, and I worked with them to resolve the problems. In one case, I actually got to witness the corrective actions they took — including new policies and procedures — and was really pleased to have been able to be part of making a real difference. So that to me is my beacon of light, because I’ve seen a turnaround occur when you have a hostile environment.Practicing law is a bit of a second career for me. I went to law school about 10 years after I graduated from college. Before that, I was an administrator at Bowdoin College. I got to a place when I was working at Bowdoin where I wanted to have more opportunities in higher education to make a contribution and felt legal skills would make that possible. I really went to law school with the intent of returning to higher education.I went to law school — Vermont Law School — as a single mom. I had a lot of people telling me I was insane. My first semester there I got in a conversation there with one of the faculty, in which he really encouraged me to focus on education law. And in my second year of law school, I got involved with the Vermont legislature’s House Education Committee. Before I graduated from law school, I did a report on school violence, which would certainly include the conduct we are talking about when we are talking about Title IX. Looking back, it was the first point when I started to delve into the interplay between protecting civil rights, violence prevention, and introducing a public health approach to some of the underlying causes of the problems that plague our schools. That report was distributed to all superintendents across all of the state and ultimately was the catalyst for a school safety act that was passed. And that act made a real difference to lots of kids in Vermont schools.last_img read more

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Nassau DA Kathleen Rice Wins Seat in Congress

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Nassau County District Attorney Kathleen Rice has won a new job, replacing retiring U.S. Rep. Carolyn McCarthy (D-Mineola), a gun-control advocate who was the first Congresswoman to represent part of Long Island.Rice, a 49-year-old Democrat from Garden City, defeated Republican Bruce Blakeman, 59, a former presiding officer of the Nassau County Legislature and former Port Authority board member from Long Beach, who had tried to make her sound weak on national security issues. Unlike her, he promised he’d vote to repeal President Obama’s signature achievement, the Affordable Care Act health care reform, aka Obamacare.“From the minute I sat down at her kitchen table…last January there was no going back and she was at my side the whole way,” Rice told supporters at the Garden City Hotel. “We did something really simple tonight, we also did something really important. We proved that positivity…beats fear mongering.”Rice won 52 percent of the vote over Blakeman, who won 47 percent, according to the Nassau County Board of Elections. She also ran on the Working Families Party line while Blakeman also had the Conservative and Tax Revolt party lines.“My only real regret is that I’m not going to get to fight the fights with [Congressman Peter King],” Blakeman told supporters at GOP Election Night headquarters in Westbury. “We started this race against all odds and we lost at the wire.”Rice, who unsuccessfully ran for New York State attorney general four years ago, leaves her Mineola office for Washington, D.C. after serving eight years as Nassau’s first female district attorney—a job she won by unseating longtime Republican incumbent Denis Dillon. During her tenure, she cracked down on drunk driving and won the first murder conviction against a drunken driver who caused a fatal crash. She also responded to a college admissions-test cheating scandal in Great Neck by helping to foster changes nationwide in test security.She joins the House of Representatives as a member of the Democratic minority, which lost more ground against the Republicans in this off-year election. She said she wanted to find ways to fund federal investments in the nation’s crumbling infrastructure. She also supported raising the minimum wage, keeping a lid on middle class taxes and reforming immigration laws.And in line with her predecessor’s policy, Rice has promised to persist in McCarthy’s decades-long fight to stem gun violence by closing gun-show loopholes that let people buy weapons without undergoing background checks. So, once Rice is in Congress, she too will become a political target for the National Rifle Association.What she can accomplish in a GOP-dominated Congress remains to be seen.McCarthy, who was on stage for the victory speech, said: “I have worked with Kathleen for a lot of years and…[when] I decided I was going to retire there was only one person in my mind that I wanted to take over the district.”As for the rest of Long Island’s congressional delegation, U.S. Rep. Tim Bishop (D-Southampton) was unseated by New York State Sen. Lee Zeldin (R-Shirley). Winning re-elections were U.S. Rep. Peter King (R-Seaford), U.S. Rep. Steve Israel (D-Dix Hills) and U.S. Rep. Gregory Meeks (D-Queens)last_img read more

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Arsenal star Dani Ceballos produces stunning pre-assist for Spain vs Romania

first_img Full Screen Comment by Metro Advertisement Top articles PLAY Arsenal star Dani Ceballos impressed in Spain’s win over Romania on Thursday (Picture: Getty)Dani Ceballos has already established himself as a firm favourite of Arsenal fans following his loan move from Real Madrid and he took his domestic form onto the international stage during Spain’s win over Romania on Thursday.The elegant midfielder starred for Spain’s Under-21 side during the summer, but despite being named player of the tournament at the European Championships Zinedine Zidane could find no room for the former Real Betis star in his side.Arsenal pounced at the opportunity to take Ceballos on loan for the season and he has quickly made himself almost indispensable to Unai Emery following a series of impressive displays, most notably against Burnley when he created both goals in a 2-1 win and left the field to standing ovation.AdvertisementAdvertisementCeballos was rewarded with his seventh full international cap by Spain manager Roberto Moreno last night and he looked at ease alongside the likes of Sergio Busquets and Saul Niguez.ADVERTISEMENT SPONSORED Arsenal star Dani Ceballos produces stunning pre-assist for Spain vs Romania Metro Sport ReporterFriday 6 Sep 2019 8:46 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link279Shares Visit Advertiser website GO TO PAGE About Connatix V67539 Video Settings Read More Advertisement Read Morecenter_img 1 min. story Still that pass tonight 🤙💥💥💥💥👌#ceballos— Wale_AFC (@Deuce_kidd) September 5, 2019 1/1 Skip Skip Ad Rio Ferdinand tells Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop struggling / Read More Read More More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityA Sergio Ramos penalty put Spain ahead just before the half hour mark and Ceballos helped make the game safe two minutes after the re-start with a sublime pre-assist.The Arsenal star picked up the ball just outside the D and played a stunning pass with the outside of his right foot inside the full-back, finding rampaging left-back Jordi Alba who crossed low to provide an unmissable chance for Paco Alcacer.It was the Borussia Dortmund striker’s 10th goal for his country but Arsenal fans new who deserved the credit…That split pass by Dani Ceballos yesterday against Bulgaria leading to a goal is quite something 💯💯#Arsenal— E-ny (@mchenrio) September 6, 2019 Read More Manchester United captain Harry Maguire Coming Next More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenallast_img read more

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Three groups take on AN remains

first_imgWinning bidders for the three main elements of Australian National offered for sale to the private sector were announced on August 28 by Federal Minister for Transport & Regional Development John Sharp.Combined gross value of the successful bids is A$95·4m, but Sharp said the government could have raised A$30m more had price been the only consideration. Bidders were also judged on quality, he emphasised. ’The end deal was best for jobs, regional development and expansion of the rail system.’ Collectively, the buyers are committed to capital expenditure of A$97m over the next four to six years.US regional railroad Wisconsin Central, with its New Zealand partners which already own TranzRail, will take over AN’s 1067mm gauge Tasrail network in Tasmania. Under the deal, the government will provide A$10m for land restoration and A$5m for track upgrading, making the net sale value only A$7m. Residual freight and engineering operations in South Australia go to a grouping led by US short line investment group Genesee & Wyoming Inc with local firms Clyde Engineering and Transfield. According to the minister, the group has agreed to retain 42 apprentices taken on by AN and make Port Augusta its main engineering base, ’ensuring the town’s future’.Winner of the passenger operations is Great Southern Railway, a consortium of British train operating franchisee GB Railways with Serco Bank Asia and Sydney-based Macquarie Bank. According to GSR, the company is committed to expanding and improving the passenger routes it has acquired. It is committed to routing the Sydney – Perth Indian Pacific via Melbourne, extending the Alice Springs – Adelaide The Ghan to Sydney and Melbourne, improving Adelaide connections for the Overland and providing additional services to Broken Hill. These plans are backed by a A$13·4m capital expenditure programme. oThe Australian National saleLong-distance passenger servicesGreat Southern Railway (GB Railways, Serco Asia Pacific, Macquarie Bank). A$16mSouth Australia Intrastate Freight and MaintenanceGenesee & Wyoming Inc with consortium including Clyde Engineering and Transfield. A$57·4mTasrail Wisconsin Central/Tranz Rail. A$22mlast_img read more