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Your mobile phone can give away your location, even if you…

first_img TAGStheconversation.com Previous articleApopka Police Department awards McDonalds staffers for heroic act of kindnessNext articleApopka teenager is one of Florida’s Top Youth Volunteers Of 2018 Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 U.S. military officials were recently caught off guard by revelations that servicemembers’ digital fitness trackers were storing the locations of their workouts – including at or near military bases and clandestine sites around the world. But this threat is not limited to Fitbits and similar devices. My group’s recent research has shown how mobile phones can also track their users through stores and cities and around the world – even when users turn off their phones’ location-tracking services.The vulnerability comes from the wide range of sensors phones are equipped with – not just GPS and communications interfaces, but gyroscopes and accelerometers that can tell whether a phone is being held upright or on its side and can measure other movements too. Apps on the phone can use those sensors to perform tasks users aren’t expecting – like following a user’s movements turn by turn along city streets.Most people expect that turning their phone’s location services off disables this sort of mobile surveillance. But the research I conduct with my colleagues Sashank Narain, Triet Vo-Huu, Ken Block and Amirali Sanatinia at Northeastern University, in a field called “side-channel attacks,” uncovers ways that apps can avoid or escape those restrictions. We have revealed how a phone can listen in on a user’s finger-typing to discover a secret password – and how simply carrying a phone in your pocket can tell data companies where you are and where you’re going.Making assumptions about attacksWhen designing protection for a device or a system, people make assumptions about what threats will occur. Cars, for instance, are designed to protect their occupants from crashes with other cars, buildings, guardrails, telephone poles and other objects commonly found in or near roads. They’re not designed to keep people safe in cars driven off a cliff or smashed by huge rocks dropped on them. It’s just not cost-effective to engineer defenses against those threats because they’re assumed to be extremely uncommon.Similarly, people designing software and hardware make assumptions about what hackers might do. But that doesn’t mean devices are safe. One of the first side-channel attacks was identified back in 1996 by cryptographer Paul Kocher, who showed he could break popular and supposedly secure cryptosystems by carefully timing how long it took a computer to decrypt an encrypted message. The cryptosystem designers hadn’t imagined that an attacker would take that approach, so their system was vulnerable to it.There have been many other attacks through the years using all sorts of different approaches. The recent Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities that exploit design flaws in computer processors, are also side-channel attacks. They enable malicious applications to snoop on other applications’ data in the computer memory.Monitoring on the goMobile devices are perfect targets for this sort of attack from an unexpected direction. They are stuffed with sensors, usually including at least one accelerometer, a gyroscope, a magnetometer, a barometer, up to four microphones, one or two cameras, a thermometer, a pedometer, a light sensor and a humidity sensor.Apps can access most of these sensors without asking for permission from the user. And by combining readings from two or more devices, it’s often possible to do things that users, phone designers and app creators alike may not expect.In one recent project, we developed an app that could determine what letters a user was typing on a mobile phone’s on-screen keyboard – without reading inputs from the keyboard. Rather, we combined information from the phone’s gyroscope and its microphones.When a user taps on the screen in different locations, the phone itself rotates slightly in ways that can be measured by the three-axis micromechanical gyroscopes found in most current phones. Further, tapping on a phone screen produces a sound that can be recorded on each of a phone’s multiple microphones. A tap close to the center of the screen will not move the phone much, will reach both microphones at the same time, and will sound roughly the same to all the microphones. However, a tap at the bottom left edge of the screen will rotate the phone left and down; it will reach the left microphone faster; and it will sound louder to microphones near the bottom of the screen and quieter to microphones elsewhere on the device.Processing the movement and sound data together let us determine what key a user pressed, and we were right over 90 percent of the time. This sort of function could be added secretly to any app and could run unnoticed by a user.Identifying a locationWe then wondered whether a malicious application could infer a user’s whereabouts, including where they lived and worked, and what routes they traveled – information most people consider very private.We wanted to find out whether a user’s location could be identified using only sensors that don’t require users’ permission. The route taken by a driver, for instance, can be simplified into a series of turns, each in a certain direction and with a certain angle. With another app, we used a phone’s compass to observe the person’s direction of travel. That app also used the phone’s gyroscope, measuring the sequence of turn angles of the route traveled by the user. And the accelerometer showed whether a user was stopped, or moving.By measuring a sequence of turns, and stringing them together as a person travels, we could make a map of their movements. (In our work, we knew which city we were tracking people through, but a similar approach could be used to figure out what city a person was in.)Matching the route of a smartphone with a trip through Boston. Screenshot of Google Maps, CC BY-NDImagine we observe a person in Boston heading southwest, turning 100 degrees to the right, making a sharp U-turn to the left to head southeast, turning slightly to the right, continuing straight, then following a shallow curve to the left, a quick jog to the right, bumping up and down more than usual on a road, turning 55 degrees right, and turning 97 degrees left and then making a slight curve right before stopping.We developed an algorithm to match those movements up against a digitized map of the streets of the city the user was in, and determined which were the most likely routes a person might take. Those movements could identify a route driving from Fenway Park, along the Back Bay Fens, past the Museum of Fine Arts and arriving at Northeastern University.We were even able to refine our algorithm to incorporate information about curves in roads and speed limits to help narrow options. We produced our results as a list of possible pathsranked by how likely the algorithm thought they were to match the actual route. About half the time, in most cities we tried, the real path a user followed was in the top 10 items on the list. Further refining the map data, sensor readings and the matching algorithm could substantially improve our accuracy. Again, this type of capability could be added to any app by a malicious developer, letting innocent-appearing apps snoop on their users.Our research group is continuing to investigate how side-channel attacks can be used to reveal a variety of private information. For instance, measuring how a phone moves when its owner is walking could suggest how old a person is, whether they are male (with the phone in a pocket) or female (typically with the phone in a purse), or even health information about how steady a person is on his feet or how often she stumbles. We assume there is more your phone can tell a snoop – and we hope to find out what, and how, to protect against that sort of spying. Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Please enter your comment! Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. The Anatomy of Fear Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Please enter your name herelast_img read more

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NCVO launches Charity Ethical Principles

first_imgNCVO launches Charity Ethical Principles Melanie May | 18 January 2019 | News NCVO launches its Charity Ethical Principles today (18 January) a benchmark of good practice aimed at helping charities become more inclusive, open and ethical in how they work and treat people.Under the Charity Ethical Principles, formerly referred to as the Charity Code of Ethics, charities agree to put beneficiaries first, uphold the highest level of institutional integrity and personal conduct at all times, and commit to openness by creating a culture and space that makes it is clear to everyone how they work, deal with any problems, and spend their funds. Charities must also agree that every person that comes into contact with the charity should be treated with dignity and respect, and feel they are in a safe and supportive environment.The Principles have been developed with sector engagement, led by Dame Mary Marsh, supported by NCVO and a wider advisory group representing the sector.The guidance is intended as complementary to existing codes such as the Charity Governance Code, and is a voluntary framework. However, NCVO is encouraging all charity governing bodies, staff and volunteers to actively consider the principles and how they can integrate them throughout their work.Each of the principles in the document is accompanied by guidance on how it can be upheld, providing broad, instructive statements that charities using the code should observe.A summary of the feedback received during the development of the Principles has also been published today.Dame Mary Marsh said:“It has been a privilege to lead this important piece of work and I would like to thank all those who contributed so thoughtfully. These principles demonstrate how much we all want to live our values in everything we do and show the public that charities aim to be places where everyone meets the highest ethical standards.”Sir Stuart Etherington, Chief Executive of NCVO, said: Advertisement  444 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis14 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis14center_img Tagged with: ethics NCVO “NCVO is pleased to have supported the development of the Charity Ethical Principles. I hope they will be widely used by charities in their decision making and in the development of their policies and procedures. This work does not end here and we are open to further development of this important guidance once organisations have started to use it as part of their decision making.”NCVO has also said that it sees the Charity Ethical Principles as a living document and encourages voluntary organisations using the principles in their work to email [email protected] with any comments.  443 total views,  1 views today About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

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Perdue Calls for Investigation Into Cattle Markets After Kansas Fire

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News Perdue Calls for Investigation Into Cattle Markets After Kansas Fire Perdue Calls for Investigation Into Cattle Markets After Kansas Fire Previous articlePerdue Says Farmers “Keep on Keepin’ On” Despite Trade Issues on the HAT Thursday Morning EditionNext articleWeekly Ethanol Production Increases as More Plants Close Hoosier Ag Today SHARE SHARE By Hoosier Ag Today – Aug 29, 2019 Facebook Twitter Facebook Twitter U.S. Ag Secretary Sonny Perdue has been monitoring the impact of a fire at the beef processing facility in Holcomb, Kansas.As a part of that monitoring effort, Perdue says, “I have directed USDA’s Packers and Stockyards Division to launch an investigation into recent beef pricing margins to determine if there is any evidence of price manipulation, collusion, restrictions of competition, or other unfair practices.”Perdue says if any unfair practices are found, his agency will take quick enforcement action.The USDA remains in close contact with plant management and other stakeholders to understand the fire’s impact on the industry.The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association was pleased with Perdue’s announcement. NCBA President Jennifer Houston says the announcement demonstrates the government’s understanding of the extreme strain placed on the cattle industry by the plant fire in Kansas.“We encourage USDA to look at all aspects of the beef supply chain and to utilize internal and external expertise in the investigation,” she says. “We believe it adds transparency that will help build confidence in the markets among cattlemen and women.”last_img read more

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Pasadena Police Department to Step Up Enforcement for Distracted Drivers

first_imgHerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Most Influential Women In HistoryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWomen Love These Great Tips To Making Your Teeth Look WhiterHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyBohemian Summer: How To Wear The Boho Trend RightHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyYou Can’t Go Past Our Healthy Quick RecipesHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeauty Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Subscribe More Cool Stuff Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Community News Community News 0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it latest #1 Pasadena Police Department to Step Up Enforcement for Distracted Drivers Published on Thursday, March 26, 2015 | 4:16 pmcenter_img Make a comment In an effort to make our roads safer, Pasadena Police Department is deploying extra traffic enforcement officers on Friday, April 3 and Monday, April 6, 2015, to stop distracted driving. Pasadena PD is spreading the message that distracted drivers are not only a danger to themselves, but everyone else on the road.Using an electronic device while driving is a serious safety problem. Most drivers know that texting while driving is a dangerous behavior, but many still use their cell phones and other mobile devices when they are behind the wheel, putting themselves and others at risk. Many drivers see distracted driving as risky when other drivers do it, but do not recognize how their own driving deteriorates.In 2012, 3,328 people were killed and 421,000 were injured nationwide in crashes involving a distracted driver. That same year, eleven percent of fatal crashes were reported as distractionaffected crashes.While anything that takes your eyes off the road, hands off the wheel, or mind off the task of driving is a hazard, there is heightened concern about the risks of texting while driving because it combines all three types of distraction – visual, manual and cognitive. In addition, most drivers aren’t aware that just talking on a cell phone, hand held or hands free, can lead to “inattention blindness” as critical brain functions needed for driving are used for cell phone talking.At any given daylight moment across America, there are about 660,000 drivers using cell phones or manipulating electronic devices while driving. Pasadena Police Department is focusing on ways to change the behavior of drivers through enforcement, public awareness and education – the same activities that have curbed drunk driving and increased seat belt use.In a national survey, almost half (48%) of drivers say they answer their cell phones while driving at least some of the time, and more than half of those (58%) continue to drive after answering the call. Your Police Department recommends the following safety measures:You can:• turn off electronic devices and put them out of reach before starting to drive• speak up when you are a passenger and your driver uses an electronic device while driving. Offer to make the call for the driver, so his or her full attention stays on the driving taskParents can:• be good role models for young drivers and set a good example. Talk with your teens about responsible driving• If you know your teen is on the road – don’t call or text them until you know they have reached their destinationEmployers can:• Adopt, publicize, and enforce company policies that prohibit employees from texting or talking on hand-held cell phones while in a company vehicle or, in a personal vehicle while using a company issued cell phone.Funding for this program is provided by a grant from the California Office of Traffic Safety, through the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. For more information about distracted driving, please visit www.distraction.gov. EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Business News Top of the News First Heatwave Expected Next Week Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

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Clean up vacant shops-Kearney

first_imgEmail Previous articleThrowing light on Sarsfield BridgeNext articlePipe bombs made safe admin Owners must be penalisedMOVES by City Hall to attract new business to the city centre are being hampered by their own failure to penalise owners of vacant shop units, claims a leading city auctioneer.Pat Kearney of Rooney Auctioneers, told the Limerick Post that he has had approaches from leading retailers to identify premises in LimerickSign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up -”but it is embarrassing on walkabouts when confronted with unsightly posters, boarded up units, bushes growing out of facades of buildings, etc.“It can be a difficult sell. Who would want to take on a decent looking shop placed on the market when the units around them have that neglected look.“Take Marks & Spencer for example. If they fail to get permission at the Crescent, and the Opera Centre is further delayed, where else could they open? They would run from the city.“We need instant regulation of vacant city centre units to present a clean face”.He has been supported by Green candidate in the Local Elections, James Nix, who, in an effort to revitalise the city centre, has called on the authorities to provide half rates to new tenants in their first year in operation.And a Limerick businesswoman, who asked not to be identified, called for drastic action to improve the image of the city.“There are fewer and fewer people coming into town…we need to make it more attractive and that can only be done by encouraging new traders to set up here”.Kearney called on City Council to introduce by-laws giving them authority to clean up vacant units and to send the bill to the owners.“I know from my years in business that Limerick had a lot to offer and as a location, appeals to both Irish traders and multinationals.“But we are allowing it to fall into decay. I accept that the people at City Hall want to revitalise the city, but if that is to be done then they must take action. All those closed shops, many of them falling into a state of disrepair, could be left there for years, unless City Hall get tough.Continued from page 1.“Just look at Catherine Street, across from the Health Board offices. A whole row of shops and houses there are just waiting to fall”.Kearney proposes that the students at the School of Art and Design, be contracted to display their artistic talents by providing paintings of Limerick, mock interiors and murals for display on vacant shop fronts.“At least that would keep facades in a clean condition”.There are literally dozens of units lying idle in our main thoroughfares, which are in effect creating the appearance of a retail ghetto and in many instances, owners are not paying attention to their upkeep. WhatsApp Twitter Linkedincenter_img Print Facebook Advertisement NewsLocal NewsClean up vacant shops-KearneyBy admin – April 2, 2009 478 last_img read more

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COVID-19 : Centre Grants Relaxations To NRIs On ‘Residential Status’ Under Income Tax Act For FY 2019-20

first_imgNews UpdatesCOVID-19 : Centre Grants Relaxations To NRIs On ‘Residential Status’ Under Income Tax Act For FY 2019-20 LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK8 May 2020 8:36 PMShare This – xTaking note of the COVID-19 lockdown, the Central Government has granted relaxations to the criteria for determining ‘residential status’ under Section 6 of the Income Tax Act,1961, for the Financial Year 2019-20.As per Section 6 of Income Tax Act (before 2020 amendment), stay for 182 days or more in India during a financial year will make an individual ‘resident in India’ for the purposes…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginTaking note of the COVID-19 lockdown, the Central Government has granted relaxations to the criteria for determining ‘residential status’ under Section 6 of the Income Tax Act,1961, for the Financial Year 2019-20.As per Section 6 of Income Tax Act (before 2020 amendment), stay for 182 days or more in India during a financial year will make an individual ‘resident in India’ for the purposes of income tax liability.Several individuals, who are otherwise non-resident Indians, had to prolong their stay in India on account of the COVID-19 lockdown. Considering various representations seeking relaxations on residency status, the Central Board of Direct Taxes has granted the following relaxations.For the purpose of determining the residential status under Section 6 of the Act during the previous year 2019-20 in respect of an individual who has come to India on a visit before 22nd March, 2020 and :has been unable to leave India on or before 31st March, 2020, his period of stay in India from 22nd March, 2020 to 31st March 2020 shall not be taken into account;has been quarantined in India on account of Novel Corona Virus (Covid-19) on or after 1st March, 2020 and has departed on an evacuation flight on or before 21st March 2020 or has been unable to leave India on or before 31st March, 2020, his period of stay from the beginning of his quarantine to his date of departure or 31st March, 2020, as the case may be, shall not be taken into account; orhas departed on an evacuation flight on or before 31st March, 2020, his period of stay in India from 22nd March, 2020 to his date of departure shall not be taken into account.The Central Board of Direct Taxes invoked powers under Section 119 of the Income Tax Act for making the above changes. Circular for determining the residential status in such cases for Financial Year 2020-21 would be issued in due course, depending upon normalisation of/ resumption of international flights, the Income Tax department clarified.The Finance Act 2020 has amended Section 6 to reduce the period of stay in India as 120 days from 182 days for claiming NRI status with effect from FY 2020-2021.  Govt gives relief on residency status to NRIs/foreign visitors whose stay in India got prolonged due to lockdown.Prolonged stay in India to be discounted.CBDT issues Circular clarifying residential status u/s 6 of Income Tax Act wrt FY2019-20 pic.twitter.com/s7fxXpDYd8— Live Law (@LiveLawIndia) May 9, 2020Next Storylast_img read more

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Emergency services attending crash at Fahan

first_img Pinterest Emergency services attending crash at Fahan Facebook Facebook Twitter News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Previous articleFlood prevention measures being considered for KillybegsNext articleBreaking: Gardai investigating burglary at Centra Carrigart News Highland DL Debate – 24/05/21 WhatsApp Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Twittercenter_img Google+ RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Pinterest Homepage BannerNews Google+ By News Highland – October 18, 2017 Emergency services are currently attending the scene of a crash in Fahan.The crash happened just before 8am this morning on the Letterkenny side of the village.It’s understood that nobody has been seriously injured however motorists are advised to approach the area with caution. Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programmelast_img read more

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Father, daughter to face murder charges in killing initially blamed on panhandlers

first_imgBaltimore Police Dept.(BALTIMORE) — A father and daughter who allegedly fabricated a story of a panhandler stabbing his wife to death when she gave them money were extradited to Baltimore early Thursday to face murder charges. Keith and Valeria Smith were brought back to Maryland by the Baltimore Police Department’s Warrant Apprehension Task Force after being caught in Texas earlier this month while attempting to make a run for the Mexican border, authorities said. The father and daughter arrived at the Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport shortly after midnight and were immediately driven to the Central Booking Intake Facility in Baltimore, police said. Baltimore police released video and photos of the pair being taken off the plane on the tarmac, put into handcuffs and driven away. It was not immediately clear when they will appear in court. They are both charged with first-degree murder in the Dec. 1 stabbing death of Keith Smith’s wife, Jacquelyn Smith, 54. The supects initially claimed Jacquelyn Smith was stabbed by one of two panhandlers she spotted while driving through East Baltimore. In interviews with homicide detectives and at a news conference shortly after the killing, the pair claimed Jacquelyn Smith was stabbed when she asked her husband to pull over so she could give $10 to a female panhandler who appeared to be holding a baby. Keith Smith told ABC News shortly after the killing that both panhandlers approached their car and the male panhandler stabbed his wife and snatched her chain as he and the woman were thanking her for the money. He said the woman panhandler reached into the car, grabbed his wife’s purse and ran. But on March 3, Michael Harrison, acting commissioner of the Baltimore Police Department, said the story told by Keith and Valeria Smith “was not true.” Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh slammed the suspects for using issues of homelessness as a ruse in an alleged attempt to cover up the killing. “These individuals took advantage of a situation, a city that is already dealing with its own problems,” Pugh said earlier this month. “We’re looking forward to this cruel act being brought to justice.” The father and daughter were arrested that day in Harlingen, Texas, which is near the Mexican border. Police said they suspect the pair was attempting to cross the border and disappear. Since his arrest, Keith Smith’s criminal history has come under increased scrutiny. He pleaded guilty in 2001 to robbing the same bank in Timonium, Maryland, three times in nine months, according to reports obtained by ABC News from the Baltimore County Police Department.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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African American family mourns four loved ones as COVID-19 racial disparities exposed

first_imgSamara Heisz/iStock(NEW ORLEANS) — In the span of just 10 days, Kevin Franklin lost his 86-year-old mother and three big brothers to the coronavirus pandemic, and he says his loved ones didn’t know they had the disease until it was too late.“No one seemed sick. Nobody complained about nothing,” the 56-year-old Franklin told ABC News. “We didn’t know my mom had it until my mom went into the hospital.” Long-time residents of New Orleans, the Franklin family survived Hurricane Katrina, but the floodwaters that devastated the city in 2005 were a bit easier to battle because they could at least see them. Like Katrina, though, the coronavirus, also known as COVID-19, appears to be bringing a disproportionate amount of pain to African Americans like Kevin Franklin, who is mourning his mother, Antoinette, and his brothers Herman, 71, Timothy, 61, and Anthony, 58, all at the same time.“I’m just torn up right now,” Kevin Franklin said. His life has been one of anguish and anxiety since March 20 when Herman Franklin was the first of the four to die at Ochsner Baptist Medical Center.Preliminary data from coast to coast has suddenly cast a harsh spotlight on the pandemic’s lopsided toll on the African American community in Louisiana and across the nation.Blacks accounted for 70% of the 702 deaths in Louisiana linked to the coronavirus as of Thursday. Louisiana Health Department data shows that 66% of those who have perished from the pathogen suffered from hypertension, 43% had diabetes, 24% were dealing with obesity and 22% had cardiac disease. Blacks account for 32% of the population of the state and 13% of the country as a whole, according to Census data.“We have a particularly difficult problem of an exacerbation of a health disparity. We’ve known, literally forever, that diseases like diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and asthma are disproportionately afflicting the minority populations, particularly the African Americans,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and a member of President Donald Trump’s Coronavirus Task Force, said at White House briefing this week.“Unfortunately, when you look at the predisposing conditions that lead to a bad outcome with coronavirus — the things that get people into ICUs that require intubation and often lead to death — they are just those very comorbidities that are, unfortunately, disproportionately prevalent in the African American population,” Fauci added. “So we’re very concerned about that. It’s very sad. There’s nothing we can do about it right now, except to try and give them the best possible care to avoid those complications.”Grim numbersData in many locations across the nation appears to mirror what’s coming out of Louisiana (as of April 9):— Of the more than 6,600 confirmed cases of coronavirus in Chicago, 52% were black. Of the 196 deaths in Chicago linked to the disease, 67% were black, most with underlying chronic conditions, according to a daily tally provided Thursday afternoon by the city. Blacks make up 30% of the city’s population, per the Census.— In Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, 45% of the more than 1,500 people who had tested positive for the virus as of Thursday were black. Of the 68 people in the county to die from the disease, 45, or 66%, were black, according to numbers provided by officials there. Some 27% of the population is black in the county, the Census said.— In Michigan, blacks accounted for 40% of the more than 1,000 deaths, and 33% of confirmed COVID-19 cases, despite being 14% of the population. In Detroit, blacks, who represent 79% of the population, accounted for 76% of the 272 deaths in the city. But whites, who account for 15% of the population, represent 4% of the deaths and 3% of the cases. — While blacks comprise 22% of the population of North Carolina, they accounted for 39% of the more than 3,600 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 38% of the more than 60 deaths. Whites in the state accounted for 55% of confirmed cases and 63% of deaths, but make up 71% of the state’s population, according to the state Health Department.— In Maryland, blacks make up 31% of the population and 40% of the 138 deaths, according to the Maryland Department of Public Health.— In Ohio, blacks represent 13% of the population and 20% of the 5,500 confirmed cases and 13% of the 213 deaths, according to state data. Whites make up 81% of the population in Ohio, but 61% of the deaths.— And in Minnesota, blacks make up 9% of the population, but represent 8% of the more than 1,200 COVID cases and 2% of the 50 deaths, according to state data. Whites make up 84% of the population and 88% of the deaths.Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer told ABC News that while the virus is hitting people of all races in Michigan, it “is uniquely harmful to people that have had historical inequities.”She stressed that the only way to learn from the pandemic and prepare for the next is to drill down into the data and pinpoint ways to make sure the health care system doesn’t neglect minority communities. She urged other states to collect and release detailed information in order to ”level the barriers to health care and job opportunities, raising a family and education.”The data provided by other states is less clear when it comes to racial demographics. In some states, like Virginia and Massachusetts, there are large percentages where races are either unknown or not reported, making it tough to get a clear picture.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a portion of preliminary nationwide data on Wednesday amid increased political pressure to do so.While the CDC report was based on a scant sampling in March of 1,482 patients in 14 states and included race and ethnicity information on about 580 hospitalized cases, it showed that blacks, who represent 13% of the U.S. population, made up 33% of hospitalized coronavirus cases “suggesting that black populations might be disproportionately affected by COVID-19.”The CDC report does not mention deaths.There were more than 466,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in the United States, as of Thursday evening, and the virus had killed more than 16,600 people in the nation, so the sampling in the CDC report is just a fraction of the known cases in the U.S.Vice President Mike Pence said a group of African American leaders have been invited to the White House to discuss concerns raised by the early data.‘Lack of information will exacerbate existing health disparities’In a letter sent on March 30 to Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Rep. Ayanna Pressley, both Massachusetts Democrats, ask for comprehensive demographic data on people who are tested or treated for COVID-19.”Any attempt to contain COVID-19 in the United States will have to address its potential spread in low-income communities of color, first and foremost to protect the lives of people in those communities, but also to slow the spread of the virus in the country as a whole,” the lawmakers wrote to Azar. ”This lack of information will exacerbate existing health disparities and result in the loss of lives in vulnerable communities.”The Poor People’s Campaign, a nonprofit grassroots organization that is a revival of the one started by Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and led to the 1968 Poor People’s March on Washington, issued a statement Wednesday calling on hospitals and health departments across the country to begin reporting coronavirus cases by race and ethnicity, poverty and income.”Failure to do so masks underlying inequalities and hampers efforts to ensure prevention is equitable,” the organization’s COVID-19 Health Justice Advisory Committee, which is made up of experts from Harvard University, UCLA and other schools, said in a statement. “To mitigate the spread of the virus, everyone must have access to free and respectful medical testing, a safe place to recover, and high-quality medical treatment. Poor people and people of color must not be denied equal access to care.”‘It’s sick, it’s troubling, it’s wrong’New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio on Wednesday warned that a day of reckoning is at hand for the disparities wrought by an American health care system that he says generally bases its level of care on the content of an individual’s pocketbook.”It’s just abundantly clear that it’s sick, it’s troubling, it’s wrong,” de Blasio said. “Our nation has still not come to grips with the fact that health care is provided so unevenly and all based on how much money you have.”In New York City, the current epicenter of the global contagion, longtime disparities in the health care system are being dramatically exposed in overwhelmed hospital wards and show another minority community, Hispanics, bearing the burnt of the daily bad news.Of the more than 5,100 people whose deaths in New York City have been attributed to coronavirus, blacks, who comprise 22% of the city’s population, accounted for 28% of the deaths, while whites, who make up 32% of the population, accounted for 27% of the deaths. In the state as a whole, whites make up 74% of the population, but 61% of the deaths and blacks, while comprising 9% of the population made up 17% of the more than 7,000 fatalities.Public health officials in the city also expressed concern about the Hispanic population. Some 34% of New York City’s deaths were Hispanic, despite making up just 29% of the city’s population, according to data released on Wednesday by the New York Department of Public Health.“I am very concerned when I see the large percentage of Latinos who have died from this illness even though we have made lots of efforts to reassure people that our public hospitals see individuals independent of their immigration status, independent of insurance status,” Dr. Oxiris Barbot, commissioner of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, said at a news conference on Wednesday.“The overlay of the anti-immigrant rhetoric across this country, I think, has real implications in the health of our community and certainly concerns about Public Charge are something we need to dig into,” she said, referring to federal laws denying immigrants visas or permission to enter the country due to disabilities or lack of economic resources.Dr. Patricia Tellez-Giron, associate professor at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health and co-chair of the Latino Health Council of Dane County, Wisconsin, said education and language barriers also pose roadblocks to proper health care for the Spanish-speaking community.“We were very lucky to [have] very good interpreting services set up for our hospitals before this crisis. However, when this pandemic started we didn’t have enough resources that were language and culturally appropriate for our communities,” Tellez-Giron told ABC News.“This pandemic really hit hard in my community because we can’t take advantage of the social nets that other people can take, like unemployment,” she added. “We’re on the front lines cleaning the hospitals and the stores and in the stores, and yet many of the undocumented community that we have will not take advantage of that.”In Wisconsin, Hispanics made up 10% of the cases as of April 9 and 3% of the deaths. They make up 7% of the population.Tellez-Giron has recently participated in Spanish radio programs in Wisconsin and spent nearly three hours taking questions from listeners about the COVID-19.“We knew we needed to do these as soon as possible,” Tellez-Giron said. “We jumped on the radio and started talking about prevention and people had very good questions about prevention. However, most of the questions were about what am I going to do now when I lose my job? How am I going to pay the rent? How do I protect my family?”‘A call-to-action moment’Both Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot and New York Mayor de Blasio announced this week that they are working on launching programs to reach their devastated minority communities.”This is a call-to-action moment for all of us. When we talk about equity and inclusion, they are not just nice notions,” Lightfoot said at a news conference on Monday. ”They are an imperative that we must embrace as a city. And we see this even more urgently when we look at these numbers.”Lightfoot said the city would be deploying racial equity rapid response teams into the community to identify and help vulnerable people get medical services.De Blasio said he would like to see something similar in New York City.”We’re going to have to find a way to get health care professionals out into communities to educate people, to answer their questions, to help them address their immediate challenges, but in a way that is safe for those health care workers,” de Blasio said.In an appearance on ABC’s The View on Wednesday, Sen. Kamala Harris, D-California, said no one should be surprised that the virus is taken an uneven toll on the African American community — noting that 20% of black children suffer from asthma, that 40% of blacks have high blood pressure and that black women are three times more likely than white women to have lupus.“Those who had preexisting health conditions based on racial disparities, based on socioeconomic disparities are doing even worse in the midst of this pandemic,” Harris said. “So it requires us to address it in a way that also recognizes the historical nature of it.”She suggested that one way to confront the problem would be for the Federal Emergency Management Association to direct resources to those communities that the data shows disparities in health care are most evident.“For years, I have been working on black maternal mortality, which before this pandemic was very real,” Harris said. “We were talking about it, black women are three to four times more likely to die in connection with childbirth than white women. When we looked at the issue, it had nothing to do with that woman’s education level or her socioeconomic level. It literally had to do with the fact that when a black woman was walking into a hospital or a clinic or a doctor’s office, she was not being taken seriously.” Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Two more former paperboys come forward to allege sexual abuse by supervisor: Lawsuit

first_imgpeepo/iStockBy KATE HOLLAND, ABC News(NEW YORK) — Two former paperboys for a Gannett-owned newspaper filed a complaint on Friday alleging that they were sexually abused by their supervisor nearly 40 years ago, joining five other former paperboys who have made similar allegations.Ballard Tackett, 47, and Kelby Ash, 49, allege that they were repeatedly molested by Jack J. Lazeroff, a onetime district sales manager for the Rochester, N.Y.-based Democrat & Chronicle, when Lazeroff oversaw their paper route between 1982 and 1985, when Tackett was 11 to 12 years old and Ash was 11 to 13 years old.Lazeroff’s misconduct was widely known among D&C staff, the complaint alleges, but the newspaper and its corporate owner Gannett Co., Inc., failed to protect the boys under their care, custody and control, directly resulting in their abuse.“The D&C negligently hired Lazeroff then failed to properly supervise him … permitted Lazeroff unfettered and unsupervised access to … young children, failed to address sexual abuse that was occurring in plain sight, and exposed Plaintiffs to danger,” the filing reads. “As a result of the wrongful conduct of the D&C, Plaintiffs were sexually abused.”Lazeroff was arrested in 1987 and charged with disorderly conduct, according to the lawsuit, after an employee at a donut shop told police that Lazeroff came into the donut shop “almost daily with a young paperboy” whom he would touch inappropriately. The police report identifies three D&C paperboys who Lazeroff had taken there. It is unclear, however, how the case was resolved.Lazeroff was arrested again in 1988, the lawsuit said, and “charged with sexual abuse in the second degree,” but he was reportedly allowed to plead guilty to a lesser charge in order to avoid jail time.Lazeroff died in 2003, but five other former D&C paperboys have since publicly accused him of sexual abuse, filing two separate claims against the newspaper and parent company in October 2019 and February 2020. All three filings allege that Lazeroff was hired by the D&C after being fired from his position at a Rochester bank for openly abusing high school boys who came in to apply for student loans.Spokespeople for the newspaper and its parent company did not immediately respond to a request for comment from ABC News.According to statements from several former employees detailed in the complaints, Lazeroff was ultimately fired from the paper for “messing with a paperboy,” though the exact date is unclear. The D&C has published several articles about Lazeroff, writing in one that the complaints “do not cite any direct evidence” substantiating the reason for Lazeroff’s termination from the paper.In 2019, the D&C reported that Lazeroff “might have been a sexual predator,” but that “It could not be determined whether any of Lazeroff’s supervisors at the Democrat and Chronicle knew of or acted on the allegations of misconduct against him.”Child news carriers are largely a relic of the past. A 1987 study conducted by what later became the News Media Alliance reportedly found that newspapers replaced at least 70,000 paperboys and girls with adults during the 1980s.But an understanding of the dangers of the profession have only just begun to emerge. In 2018, The Columbia Journalism Review reported that at least 12 child newspaper carriers were “abducted, sexually abused or killed” between 1970 and 1993.With their lawsuit, Tackett and Ash join thousands of other people seeking restitution through the New York State court system under the Child Victims Act, passed in 2019 and recently extended until 2021, that allows victims of childhood sexual abuse to pursue civil claims that would have otherwise expired under the state’s statute of limitations.According to James Marsh, a partner at Marsh Law Firm PLLC, which represents all seven of Lazeroff’s alleged victims, these cases “highlight the risk that all children face.”“The realization that it isn’t just scouts or students or alter boys who are at-risk for child sex abuse is profound and these lawsuits are a good example of how predators will take advantage of children wherever and however they can,” Marsh told ABC News in a statement. “Power, access, and opportunity can place any child at risk anywhere from anyone. Even a paperboy trying their best to finish their route before school can be victimized, which, while a shocking realization, also unfortunately makes perfect sense.”Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more