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Work intensity to blame for Europe’s health problems

first_img Previous Article Next Article Exposure to high levels of noise and increased back pain are highlighted ina working conditions studyMore and more workers are being exposed to physical hazards in theworkplace, musculo-skeletal disorders and fatigue because of the intensity oftheir work, according to a study of European working conditions. The European Foundation For the Improvement of Living and Working Conditionspolled a total of 21,703 workers. It follows similar studies in 1990 and 1995. While fewer workers are being exposed to cold or vapours and fumes, exposureto high-level noise has increased and more workers are carrying heavy loads orworking in painful positions. Blue-collar workers are exposed to the largest number of risk factors, withpeople in sales and service jobs suffering most from painful working positions.Plant operators, craft workers and technicians were carrying more heavy loadsand working in noisier environments. More than half (56 per cent) of respondents in the survey claim to beworking at very high speed for at least a quarter of their time, with 24 percent saying they do so for all or almost all of the time. A total of 27 per cent of those polled believe their health and safety is atrisk because of their working conditions. Workers in the construction sector feel most at risk, followed byagriculture and transport. When it comes to backache, 34 per cent say they are affected, with thebiggest increases among professionals (up from 18 per cent to 24 per cent) andtechnicians. A quarter report neck and shoulder pains, with blue collar and agriculturalworkers being most susceptible. A total of 6 per cent of respondents say they have been absent due tooccupational accidents while 9 per cent report absences because of OH problems.The report covers the 12 months up to March 2000. www.eurofound.ie Work intensity to blame for Europe’s health problemsOn 1 Jan 2002 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Male Antarctic fur seals: neglected food competitors of bioindicator species in the context of an increasing Antarctic krill fishery.

first_imgThe fishery for Antarctic krill is currently managed using a precautionary, ecosystem-based approach to limiting catch, with performance indices from a long-term monitoring program focused on several krill-dependent predators that are used to track ecosystem health. Concerns over increased fishing in concentrated areas and ongoing efforts to establish a Marine Protected Area along the Peninsula, a key fishing region, is driving the development of an adaptive management system for the fishery. The cumulative effects of fishing effort and interactions among krill-dependent predators and their performance is at present neglected in the CCAMLR Ecosystem Monitoring Program. However, we show considerable overlap between male Antarctic fur seals and the krill fishery in a complex mosaic, suggesting potential for cumulative impacts on other krill dependent predators. A holistic view is required as part of future efforts to manage the krill fishery that incorporates various sources of potential impacts on the performance of bioindicator species, including the fishery and its interactions with various krill dependent predators. © 2020, The Author(s).last_img read more

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Prep Sports Roundup: 2/14

first_img Brad James FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailBoys BasketballRegion 20 TournamentMONROE, Utah-Treyson Roberts netted 23 points and the Bryce Valley Mustangs gashed Piute 74-69 Friday at the Region 20 Tournament at South Sevier High School. The Mustangs next face Panguitch Saturday at 7:00 pm for the Region 20 Tournament title. Kelby Jessen had 18 points for the Thunderbirds in the loss.MONROE, Utah-Ryker Hatch posted 29 points and the Panguitch Bobcats bested Valley 50-42 at South Sevier High School at the Region 20 Tournament Friday. Conner Chamberlain’s 15 points led the Buffaloes in defeat.Girls Basketball3-A Second RoundPRICE, Utah-Kassidy Alder posted 12 points as the Manti Templars outlasted Delta 35-31 in the 3-A second round of the girls basketball state playoffs Friday at USU-Eastern Utah. Taylor Chidester added 7 points and 5 rebounds on 2-3 shooting for the Templars. Jordyn Nielson and Quincee Allred had 7 points apiece for the Rabbits in defeat. Manti next faces South Sevier Thursday at 5:50 pm in the 3-A state quarterfinals at Salt Lake Community College in Taylorsville.PRICE, Utah-Jarica Steck netted 22 points as the Richfield Wildcats hammered Juab 57-39 in the second round of the 3-A girls basketball state playoffs at USU-Eastern Utah Friday. Megan Robins’ 12 points led the Wasps in the loss. Richfield next faces Carbon Thursday at 5:50 pm at Salt Lake Community College in Taylorsville in the 3-A state quarterfinals.PRICE, Utah-Kenzie Jones posted 19 points as the South Sevier Rams pummeled Providence Hall 52-25 Friday in the second round of the 3-A girls basketball state playoffs at USU-Eastern Utah. Sehidi Bustillos had 6 points in the loss for the Patriots.2-A Second RoundEPHRAIM, Utah-Brinley Cornell posted 17 points and Kanab downed Beaver 52-42 Friday at Snow College in the second round of the 2-A state girls playoffs. Avery Brown’s 15 points led the Beavers in defeat. Kanab next draws Duchesne at 4:10 pm in the 2-A state quarterfinals at the Sevier Valley Center Thursday.EPHRAIM, Utah-Rylee Miller netted 16 points as the Millard Eagles hammered Gunnison Valley 60-43 in the second round of the 2-A state girls playoffs Friday at Snow College. Kennedi Knudsen had 15 points for the Bulldogs in the loss. Millard next faces North Sevier Thursday in the 2-A state quaterfias at 7:30 pm at the Sevier Valley Center.EPHRAIM, Utah-Brinley Mason led the way with 18 points as the North Sevier Wolves gashed Rowland Hall 46-32 at Snow College Friday in the second round of the 2-A state girls playoffs. Sophie Stinnett had 19 points in the loss for the Winged Lions.EPHRAIM, Utah-Debora Reis netted 21 points as the Wasatch Academy Tigers blasted Parowan 55-37 Friday at Snow College in the second round of the 2-A state girls playoffs. Brooklyn Pace led the Rams in defeat with 17 points. Wasatch Academy next faces Draper APA Thursday at 9:10 pm at the Sevier Valley Center in the 2-A state quarterfinals.Region 20 TournamentMONROE, Utah-Mataya Barney stepped up with 18 points and the Panguitch Bobcats drilled Escalante 43-32 in the Region 20 tournament Friday at South Sevier High School in the consolation bracket. Kenzie Lyman had 17 points in the loss for the Moquis. Written by Tags: Roundup February 14, 2020 /Sports News – Local Prep Sports Roundup: 2/14last_img read more

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Image of the Day: E-2C Hawkeye Launching

first_img Lt. Cmdr. Kevin Kreutz, front, and Lt. Christopher Prue, shooters aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73), give the signal to launch an E-2C Hawkeye from the Liberty Bells of Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 115 from the ship’s flight deck.George Washington and its embarked air wing, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5, provide a combat-ready force that protects and defends the collective maritime interests of the U.S. and its allies and partners in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region.Press release, Image: U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Chris Cavagnaro View post tag: americas Share this article October 29, 2014 Image of the Day: E-2C Hawkeye Launching View post tag: E-2C Back to overview,Home naval-today Image of the Day: E-2C Hawkeye Launching View post tag: USS George Washington Authorities View post tag: Hawkeye View post tag: Naval View post tag: News by topic View post tag: launching View post tag: Image of the Day View post tag: Navylast_img read more

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It’s a wonderful world

first_imgA new book out this week: Fifty Facts That Should Change the World by Jessica Williams, charts a series of horrifying statistics that gives one a rather depressing insight into the global psyche. It reveals people en masse to be ignorant and superficial and the world in which we live to have its priorities desperately out of whack. A selection of these facts is a sobering read indeed. Brazil has more Avon ladies than members of its armed services. I wasn’t quite sure how to feel about this one. On the one hand the superficiality this attests to is significantly disgusting, especially given the level of poverty in Brazil. It is after all one of the nations with the biggest discrepancies between rich and poor in the world. On the other hand a nation less obsessed with military prowess than Bush can’t be a bad thing. I’d be highly surprised if America’s defense budget wasn’t significantly higher than the money it invests in health and education. There are 67,000 people employed in the lobbying industry in Washington DC – 125 for each elected member of Congress. This further attests to the level of corruption in American politics, where lobbying plays a stronger role in the US than in any other ‘free’ country in the world. With lobbyists influencing the stances taken by politicians it is hardly surprising that America’s priorities are so twisted. As Michael Moore ( Dude, Where’s My Country) will tell you, Bush knew of the threats posed to the US by terrorist sections in Saudi Arabia, he just never delved into it too deeply because of the importance of oil to the American market. Even the Clinton presidency had strong ties with the Bin Laden family. In American politics money certainly comes before ethics. Hardly surprising in a place where Bush became president through the faults of a fouled-up electoral system and a corrupted means of resolution. Every cow in the EU is subsidised by $2.50 a day: a higher income than that of 75% of Africans. Shocking as this statistic is, it isn’t the most extreme example of cows (or rather farmers) being put before people. According to the World Bank, Japanese cows receive a whopping $7.50 every day. The Catholic aid agency Cafod calculates that for the money the EU spends protecting its farmers, each of the EU’s 21 million cows could go on a round-the-world trip once a year. I think the majority of starving Africans would settle for clean water and a sturdy meal. More people can identify the golden arches of McDonald’s than the Christian cross. This shocker was garnered from a survey of 7,000 people in six different countries. 88% recognised the arches while only 54% correctly identified the cross. I’m not so bothered about what this says about levels of religiosity: for one thing there are more Hindus and Muslims in the world than Christians. For another, people strangely seem to find it rather difficult to reconcile the teachings of love and acceptance with their desire to kill others who don’t share their religious views. However it further testifies to the astonishing level of ignorance among the masses. And, more terrifyingly, their susceptibility to advertising. If Ronald McDonald came on TV and suggested that vegetarians were evil and flouting the sacred Maccy D’s laws that demand maximum consumption of dubious meat burgers then no doubt a mass genocide of the veggie-eaters would swiftly follow. After twenty minutes soaked in these depressing numbers I was readily prepared for the most shocking of all: more people voted in the Pop Idol contest between Gareth Gates and Will Young than voted in the last general election. To be precise: fewer than 26 million attempted to effect the future of their country, while over 32 million attempted to effect the future of Top of the Pops. The very lamentable fact of the nation’s interest in two talentless youngsters strangely makes their politcal apathy less lamentable. This may be a slightly controversial point to make, since it is essentially un-democratic, but I for one am glad that voting isn’t somehow enforced. Politicians (those few of an idealistic bent) complain that people are too apathetic. They mourn that a quick shower of rain stops people coming to the polls. But such commentators don’t stop to think that perhaps needing to put a little effort into the voting process is something of a good thing. Imagine if we could vote online, or through our digital-cable boxes, or in a telephone poll. I can see it now: a Saturday night on ITV, Ant and Dec presenting, Blair and the Tory opponent of the week sitting across from each other in hot seats, Celine Dion belting out of few numbers to keep us amused: place your votes please! It’d be a bloody nightmare. If most of the nation bothered to vote, Will Young would currently be residing at No 10. Perhaps that’s a little harsh; surely people wouldn’t apply the same criteria to a pop contest that they would to a political one? Maybe not. But what criteria would they apply? Given the level of knowledge of the vast majority of the population possess, it is as likely that they’d be voting on the colour of Tony Blair’s tie as much as his stance on Europe. Anyone trivial enough to vote in a pop contest should have their name taken off the electoral roll. If this book shows us anything it’s that most people do not have enough knowledge or interest in their country – let alone the wider world – to qualify for a say in how it should be run. What Britain needs is a good, old-fashioned dictatorship. Someone get Ronald McDonald on the phone. No wait, we don’t need him. Let’s not forget our problems closer to home when we point out everybody else’s: we already have Mr Blair.ARCHIVE: 1st week TT 2004last_img read more

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Annals of climate

first_imgSuppose you want to track climate over the past century. That’s easy enough to accomplish with existing records — but what if you want to go back 500 years? What about 1,000 years? What if you want to go back even further?That’s where Harvard historian Michael McCormick comes in.McCormick, the Francis Goelet Professor of Medieval History and chair of the Initiative for the Science of the Human Past at Harvard, will lead a project aimed at constructing the most detailed historical record yet of European climate.“Until now, researchers — including myself — have been analyzing climate signals from ice cores in Greenland and trying to deduce what the impacts are for Europe and the Middle East,” McCormick said. “This project is a game changer in that respect, because we will now have signals right from the heart of Europe. For climate scientists, it should shed wonderful new light on climate conditions in historical Europe, and it should also allow us to calibrate what we find in Greenland.”McCormick expects the project to provide valuable insight into the sway climate held over ancient societies.“In recent years, historians have become increasingly aware of two things. The first is the power of material evidence — including scientific evidence — beyond the written sources we’ve traditionally worked with since the 18th and 19th centuries. The second is that … exogenous factors, such as environment, also play a role in the development of human societies.”McCormick cited a 2007 study he co-authored that identified a link between a volcanic eruption in 763 and an unusually harsh winter across Europe, resulting in widespread crop failures.“Every year through 763, Charlemagne’s father had been invading southern France, trying to conquer it,” McCormick said. “But in 764, there was no expedition. We now know why: There was no food. That’s a very clear-cut example of how this type of climate data can be useful for historians.”The new project is supported by a $525,000 grant from the London-based Arcadia Fund. It will stretch over three years as McCormick and colleagues analyze a new ice core collected from the Colle Gnifetti glacier near the Swiss-Italian border.By including climate scientists such as Paul Mayewski, director of the Climate Change Institute at the University of Maine, and Dietmar Wagenbach of the University of Heidelberg, Germany, the initiative marks the first time researchers from both disciplines have come together to investigate a single ice core.As scientists in Maine, Heidelberg, and elsewhere focus on analyzing the core, researchers at Harvard will comb through historical sources with the goal of creating a database of written records that address Europe’s climate from 1500 back to about 800. Together the international team will integrate the historical and scientific evidence.“This is the first time historians and climate scientists have put their heads together and come up with a set of questions for a specific ice core,” McCormick said.For answers, researchers will turn to what is perhaps the most advanced instrument ever developed for ice core analysis.When researchers first began studying ice cores in the 1980s, they could obtain only three or four readings for every meter of ice. Twenty year later, improvements in technology meant scientists could obtain as many as 100 measurements per meter.“That’s fine if you’re working in some place where large amounts of snow and ice build up each year,” McCormick said. “But at this site in Switzerland, where the amounts are much smaller and the deep ice is highly compressed, if you analyze it at that level you might capture a decade, or even a century in a centimeter. What you end up with is a very blurry signal.”The new technique — a laser-based sampling technology that can chip tiny amounts of the core and analyze the results — was developed by the Climate Change Institute’s W.M. Keck Laser Ice Facility. It represents a quantum leap. Researchers expect to obtain as many as 50,000 sample levels per meter.“In early tests that looked at the 15th or 16th centuries, we were able to get signals that clearly appear to be seasonal,” McCormick said. “Ultimately, we’re fairly confident we’ll be able to go as far back as the first millennium, or perhaps even further. That’s what we’re aiming for.”last_img read more

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The great shrinking auto loan margin

first_img 20SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Mark Hein As CEO for SWBC’s Financial Institution Group, Mark Hein manages the day-to-day operations and sets the strategic direction for the division. He is committed to continuous product training, increasing … Web: www.swbc.com Details It’s no secret that auto loan competition is steep; we talk about this often because we realize how important auto lending is to so many of our clients. With the number of financial institutions, ‘buy here, pay here’ car lots, insurance companies, and online retailers, credit unions are often forced to find creative ways to keep their current borrowers and attract new ones. Often times, this comes in the form of lower rates. And when rates continue to drop, not only does it become more difficult to compete for the pool of borrowers, but returns shrink on the loans that are closed, causing a decrease in interest income and revenue. In fact, according to the 2014 NADA Data report, in 2014, auto dealers sold 16.43 million units, but only experienced a profit margin of 2.2%.What’s the Driving Force Behind Declining Rates?As mentioned above, the increase in competition has driven rates down, but there are several other factors in the rate decline. Consumers have gotten more savvy, and now have online resources such as Edmunds.com and Autotrader.com that arm them with information such as invoice prices and comparable pricing for vehicles in their region so that they can negotiate for the price and rate that they want. In addition, consumers aren’t afraid to shop around to find the deal they want.Alternative Ways to Boost Revenue With auto interest income being a key business component, and the market simply not being conducive to it at the moment, credit unions have to find alternative ways to generate income while still serving their members. Point of sale and insurance products go hand-in-hand. Think of it this way: would you buy ice cream at one store and then drive across town to another store to buy cones? Probably not, so why make your members do this when it comes to purchasing valuable vehicle protection products?Vehicle protection products can sometimes have a bad reputation, particularly in the dealership F&I office where the price is marked up significantly, up to $800 for a GAP policy according to Edmunds. The fact of the matter is, a GAP policy can be critical in protecting your borrowers from the inevitable depreciation that accompanies automobile ownership, particularly those borrowers with low or no down payment. And when purchased from you, they can get a much more competitive price on the policy, making your auto loan more valuable, and ultimately building trust and loyalty with your members.Like most forms of insurance, you don’t realize how important it is until you have to use it. If your borrower gets into an accident, the last thing they want to add to the stress and worry of the situation is the frustration and disappointment of learning they still owe money on a vehicle that they can no longer drive. Vehicle protection policies can help prevent this, and in some cases, put your borrower back into a vehicle, financed by you.As you protect your members’ vehicle investment, you will inevitably boost revenue, helping to fill the gap of the interest income lost to shrinking margins. GAP with PowerBuy™ can give you the ability to provide your members with a vehicle protection product that can not only pay off the balance of their auto loan in the event of a total loss, but also give them funds to finance their next vehicle with you.Click here to learn more.last_img read more

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6 member touchpoints transformed by machine learning

first_imgThe artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning sector is poised for explosive growth in the U.S. and worldwide.In fact, research from McKinsey has found 45 percent of all work activities globally potentially could be automated by adapting currently demonstrated technology – and some 80 percent of that could be implemented with existing machine learning capabilities.So what does this mean for credit unions, and how will machine learning impact – and improve – the member experience going forward?According to Phong Q. Rock, Sr. VP, corporate strategy and business development for Feedzai, more than any other technology, today’s machine learning solutions are able to transform the consumer experience for credit union members – across the entire member lifecycle.Here are six ways members stand to benefit: continue reading » 15SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Central Islip Armed Home Invasion Probed

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Suffolk County police are investigating an armed home invasion in Central Islip last week.Four people, at least one of whom was armed with a gun, broke into a home on Clift Street, where they stole a television and iPhone from a victim inside at 1:48 a.m. Sunday, Jan. 11, police said.The victim was not injured. No arrests have been made and no description of the suspects was available.Third Squad detectives are continuing the investigation.last_img

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Cuts are on the RICS’ agenda

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img