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Derek Chauvin verdict reactions: Updates

first_imgCourt TV via ABC News(MINNEAPOLIS) — People across the United States responded to the guilty verdict that was reached in the murder trial of former Minnesota police officer Derek Chauvin, who was charged in the death of George Floyd.Chauvin was found guilty on all counts.Here’s how the news is developing. All times Eastern:Apr 21, 10:15 amAG announces civil investigation into Minneapolis Police DepartmentThe Justice Department is launching a civil investigation into the Minneapolis Police Department to determine whether the police department has a pattern or practice of unconstitutional or unlawful policing, Attorney General Merrick Garland announced Wednesday.“Accountability is an essential part of building trust with the community,” Garland said. “Public safety requires public trust.”“Justice is sometimes slow, sometimes elusive and sometimes never comes,” he said. “The Department of Justice will be unwavering in its pursuit of equal justice.”Apr 20, 11:15 pmMinneapolis police chief: ‘I respect the process and the decision’  In a statement Thursday night, Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo reacted to the verdict reached in the Derek Chauvin trial, which found one of the department’s former officers guilty in the murder of George Floyd.“I want to acknowledge and thank the jurors on this case for their immense responsibility and honorable civic duty,” he said. “The verdict has been read and I respect the process and the decision.”The chief took the moment to thank the members of the force and their families.“The past year has been difficult and challenging, yet they have continued to show up and serve our community with the respect and dignity they deserve,” he said.Arradondo asked for “calm, safety and peace in our communities” in the wake of the verdict, and said the department will “strive to do our very best to earn your trust.”The chief was one of the highest-profile witnesses to testify for the prosecution during the trial. He told jurors that Chauvin violated numerous use-of-force and ethics policies in the fatal arrest of Floyd.Apr 20, 10:54 pmCelebrities, athletes react to the Chauvin verdictIn the wake of the Derek Chauvin guilty verdict, several celebrities and athletes took to social media to react.NBA star LeBron James summed it up in one word: “Accountability.”U.S. Open champ Naomi Osaka, who wore masks with the names of victims of racial injustice and police brutality during the tournament, including Floyd’s, said she was “hit with sadness because we are celebrating something that is clear as day.”Oprah Winfrey tweeted a photo of a young Floyd, saying she was “relieved” and “cried tears of joy as each verdict was read.”TV producer Shonda Rhimes said the verdict “does not bring back Mr Floyd. But justice is truth.”Whoopi Goldberg had a similar sentiment. “No one wins,” she tweeted. “George Floyd is still gone.”Black-ish star Tracee Ellis Ross said she is “weeping with grief and relief for George’s family, his loved ones, and this country.”Model Bella Hadid shared a photo of Floyd with his daughter, saying, “Thank God for justice and accountability today.”Actor George Takei, paraphrasing Martin Luther King Jr., tweeted that “the moral arc of the universe has finally bent toward” justice.Singer Barbra Streisand thanked the jury and the high schooler, Darnella Frazier, who filmed the viral video of the “horrible act.”Apr 20, 8:40 pmMayor: ‘This is a good day in Minneapolis’Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey described a city “gripped in grief” in the 11 months since George Floyd died while in police custody, as many residents took to the streets Tuesday to celebrate the verdict in the Derek Chauvin trial.“This is a good day in Minneapolis,” Frey said during a press briefing a few hours after the verdict was announced. “But let me be exceedingly clear: This is day one.”“Justice has been rendered in this case, but we still have a long way to go to achieve true justice in our city and in our country,” he said, noting that the city is “piloting new ways of policing” in the wake of George Floyd’s death.The mayor said he was “relieved” by the verdict, and thanked the jurors and witnesses who testified.“We all wanted to see justice, we all wanted to make sure that, again, this was day one of the necessary change that we needed to see,” Frey said. “And I think we all were nervous that what has happened on so many occasions, through our judicial system, where we wouldn’t see that justice would happen.”The verdict comes as the city is also reeling from the fatal police shooting of Daunte Wright while being detained by police last week in Brooklyn Center, a Minneapolis suburb. The shooting sparked widespread protests.A curfew has not been issued for Tuesday night, “although that certainly remains an option on the table if necessary,” Frey said. “That is not the desired approach, but it is an option that will be available.”Apr 20, 8:12 pmDHS Secretary: ‘This conviction is a step toward accountability’Department of Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas weighed in on the conviction of Derek Chauvin on Twitter, Tuesday night.Mayorkas said the verdict was “a step toward accountability,” but said “it will not erase the pain felt by the Floyd family and Black Americans.”“I speak for myself and the entire Department of Homeland Security in reaffirming our commitment to do our part to end injustice as we work to make our country a safer and more equitable Nation for all,” he tweeted.Maorkas added that DHS is in contact with state and local agencies to ensure that citizens peacefully make their voices heard.-ABC News’ Luke BarrApr 20, 7:49 pmBiden, Harris deliver address from the White HousePresident Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris reacted to the verdict in the Derek Chauvin trial in an address from the White House.Biden called the guilty verdict a “giant step forward in the march toward justice in America” and commended the witnesses who testified, including police officers.“Most men and women who wear the badge serve their communities honorably. Those few who failed to meet that standard must be held accountable, and they were today. One was,” Biden said. “No one should be above the law. And today’s verdict sends that message.”“But it’s not enough,” he continued. “We can’t stop here. In order to deliver a real change in reform, we can and we must do more to reduce the likelihood that tragedy like this will ever happen to occur again.”Harris called the verdict a step forward in law enforcement reform.“A measure of justice isn’t the same as equal justice,” she said. “We still have work to do.”Harris said she and Biden will continue to urge the Senate to pass the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act.“Black men are fathers and brothers and sons and uncles and grandfathers and friends and neighbors,” she said. “Their lives must be valued in our education system, in our health care system, in our housing system, in our economic system, in our criminal justice system, in our nation — full stop.”Apr 20, 7:45 pmJury ‘fulfilled’ its duty: Attorney General Merrick GarlandU.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland weighed on Tuesday’s verdict, stating the jury “has fulfilled its civic duty.”“While the state’s prosecution was successful, I know that nothing can fill the void that the loved ones of George Floyd have felt since his death,” he said in a statement.Garland added that the Justice Department’s civil rights investigation into Floyd’s death is still ongoing.Apr 20, 6:55 pmSenate Judiciary Committee announces police reform hearingU.S. Senate Majority Whip Dick Durbin, who chairs the Judiciary Committee, said in a statement that he plans to hold a hearing on police reform next month, citing the Floyd case.“The verdict of this jury gives me hope that we can strive for a system of justice in our nation that is applied equally to all,” he said in a statement.“As Chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, I have the forum and the means to help move our nation nearer to that goal.”-ABC News’ Trish TurnerApr 20, 6:48 pmTeen who filmed viral video of arrest: ‘George Floyd we did it’The teenager who filmed George Floyd’s arrest and testified in court reacted after Derek Chauvin was found guilty of all three charges in his death.“I just cried so hard,” Darnella Frazier, 18, said in a social media post shortly after the verdict was announced. “This last hour my heart was beating so fast, I was so anxious.”“George Floyd we did it!!” she said. “Justice has been served.”Frazier, a high school student, was walking to Cup Foods with her 9-year-old cousin to buy some snacks on May 25, 2020, when they witnessed police officers pinning down Floyd.Frazier said she immediately began recording the incident with her cellphone.“He was in pain,” Frazier said of Floyd during her testimony the first week of the trial. “It seemed like, he knew … he knew it was over for him. He was terrified. He was suffering. This was a cry for help.”During her emotional, tearful testimony, Frazier said she has spent nights agonizing over what she saw.“I stayed up apologizing and apologizing to George Floyd for not doing more and not physically interacting, not saving his life,” she testified.ABC News’ Bill Hutchinson contributed to this report.Apr 20, 6:38 pmObama calls verdict ‘right thing,’ highlights activists’ work“Today, a jury in Minneapolis did the right thing,” former President Barack Obama and former First Lady Michelle Obama said in a joint statement.But the Obamas also said “true justice is about much more than a single verdict in a single trial.”“True justice requires that we come to terms with the fact that Black Americans are treated differently, every day,” they wrote. “It requires us to recognize that millions of our friends, family, and fellow citizens live in fear that their next encounter with law enforcement could be their last. And it requires us to do the sometimes thankless, often difficult, but always necessary work of making the America we know more like the America we believe in.”The Obamas said the verdict was a “necessary step,” but noted that concrete reforms to reduce and eliminate racial bias in the criminal justice system and efforts to expand economic opportunity for marginalized communities are needed.“And as we continue the fight, we can draw strength from the millions of people — especially young people — who have marched and protested and spoken up over the last year, shining a light on inequity and calling for change. Justice is closer today not simply because of this verdict, but because of their work,” they wrote.Apr 20, 6:35 pmMinnesota attorney general: Verdict is not ‘justice’Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison, the lead prosecutor in the Derek Chauvin murder trial, measuredly addressed his victory shortly after the jury delivered its guilty verdict.“I would not call today’s verdict justice, however, because justice implies true restoration,” Ellison told reporters outside the Hennepin County Government Center. “But it is accountability, which is the first step towards justice.”Ellison thanked the witnesses who testified on behalf of the prosecution, including the bystanders to Floyd’s arrest on May 25, 2020, whom he referred to as a “bouquet of humanity.”“They didn’t know George Floyd,” he said. “They stopped and raised their voices, and they even challenged authority, because they saw his humanity. They stopped and they raised their voices because they knew that what they were seeing was wrong. They didn’t need to be medical professionals or experts in the use of force. They know what was wrong. And they were right.”Ellison also addressed Floyd’s family, who had to “relive again and again the worst day of their lives.”“I’m profoundly grateful to them for giving us the time we needed to prosecute this case,” Ellison said. “They have shown the world what grace and class and encourage really look like. Although verdict alone cannot heal their pain, I hope it’s another step on the long path toward healing for them.To the 14 members of the jury, Ellison thanked them for their time and attention “to carefully listen to the evidence.”“They answered the call, and they served in a landmark trial,” he said, and asked that people respect their privacy if they so desire.Ellison referred to his legal team as “all Michael Jordans.”“We presented the best case that we could, and the jury heard us, and we’re grateful for that,” he said. “We had the sole burden of proof in the case, and history shows that winning cases like these can be difficult.”With sentencing in the coming weeks, the attorney general said “this is not the end.” He also said his office expects to present another case, but did not go into any detail.Apr 20, 6:25 pmCongressional Black Caucus vows to press forward on police reformMembers of the Congressional Black Caucus reacted to the guilty verdict in the Derek Chauvin case outside the Capitol on Tuesday, welcoming the news while vowing to press forward with police reform.“This verdict we certainly agree with, guilty on all charges,” Chair Joyce Beatty, D-Ohio, said. “But we want our message to be very clear that this is just the first step. We know clearly that justice has been delayed.”Freshman Rep. Cori Bush, D-Mo., said the verdict “should be the regular thing” rather than a surprise international news headline. “All we’re doing is saying our lives matter.”“Step one is the verdict, step two is the sentencing,” Rep. Karen Bass, D-Calif., a leader of police reform legislation negotiations, added. “Now we have to focus on transforming policing in the United States.”-ABC News’ Ben SiegelApr 20, 6:25 pmCongressional Black Caucus vows to press forward on police reformMembers of the Congressional Black Caucus reacted to the guilty verdict in the Derek Chauvin case outside the Capitol on Tuesday, welcoming the news while vowing to press forward with police reform.“This verdict we certainly agree with, guilty on all charges,” Chair Joyce Beatty, D-Ohio, said. “But we want our message to be very clear that this is just the first step. We know clearly that justice has been delayed.”Freshman Rep. Cori Bush, D-Mo., said the verdict “should be the regular thing” rather than a surprise international news headline. “All we’re doing is saying our lives matter.”“Step one is the verdict, step two is the sentencing,” Rep. Karen Bass, D-Calif., a leader of police reform legislation negotiations, added. “Now we have to focus on transforming policing in the United States.”-ABC News’ Ben SiegelApr 20, 6:08 pmDemonstrators in Minneapolis reactPeople gathered Tuesday afternoon outside of the Hennepin County Government Center and at George Floyd Square in Minneapolis to hear the verdict.While some who were gathered were celebratory, others were tearful upon learning that Chauvin was found guilty on all of the counts against him.Police departments across the United States have been bracing for this moment. A state of emergency was declared, and National Guard troApr 20, 5:48 pmThe moment George Floyd’s family heard the verdictAs George Floyd’s family watched the verdict being read, they were overcome with emotion.Bystander video footage shown in court showed Floyd talking about his family while laying on the pavement under Chauvin’s knee.“Can’t believe this, man. Mom, love you. Love you. Tell my kids I love them. I’m dead,” he said.Apr 20, 5:37 pmA ‘turning point in American history,’ Floyd family lawyer saysBen Crump, one of the attorneys for George Floyd’s family that helped settle a $27 million civil lawsuit last month, called the Derek Chauvin case a “turning point in American history for accountability of law enforcement,” after the former Minneapolis police officer was convicted on all three counts in Floyd’s death.“Painfully earned justice has arrived for George Floyd’s family and the community here in Minneapolis, but today’s verdict goes far beyond this city and has significant implications for the country and even the world,” Crump said in a statement. “But it does not end here. We have not forgotten that the other three officers who played their own roles in the death of George Floyd must still be held accountable for their actions, as well.”Antonio M. Romanucci, another attorney on the legal team, said in a statement the verdict “reinforces significant police reforms underway in Minneapolis including use-of-force reporting, a requirement to keep body-worn cameras on, and a policy for officers to de-escalate non-threatening encounters by disengaging or walking away.”He called on Minnesota state lawmakers to pass The George Floyd Arbitration Reform Bill, and for the United States Senate to pass the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act.In March, Minneapolis’ City Council approved a $27 million settlement to the family of George Floyd.Apr 20, 5:29 pmMinnesota governor calls verdict an ‘important step forward’Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz released a statement on Facebook after the verdict was read, calling it an “important step forward for justice in Minnesota.” However, he noted, the death of Daunte Wright on April 11 is a reminder that “our work has only begun.”“A year later, Derek Chauvin has been found guilty of murder and faces years behind bars,” Walz wrote. “But we know that accountability in the courtroom is only the first step.”“No verdict can bring George back, and my heart is with his family as they continue to grieve his loss. Minnesota mourns with you, and we promise the pursuit of justice for George does not end today,” he continued.“True justice for George only comes through real, systemic change to prevent this from happening again,” Walz said. “And the tragic death of Daunte Wright this week serves as a heartbreaking reminder that we still have so much more work to do to get there.”Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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A new ice-core record from Lomonosovfonna, Svalbard: viewing the 1920-97 data in relation to present climate and environmental conditions

first_imgIn 1997 a 121 m ice core was retrieved from Lomonosovfonna, the highest ice field in Spitsbergen, Svalbard (1250 m a.s.l.). Radar measurements indicate an ice depth of 126.5 m, and borehole temperature measurements show that the ice is below the melting point. High-resolution sampling of major ions, oxygen isotopes and deuterium has been performed on the core, and the results from the uppermost 36 m suggest that quasi-annual signals are preserved. The 1963 radioactive layer is situated at 18.5-18.95 m, giving a mean annual accumulation of 0.36 m w.e. for the period 1963-96. The upper 36 m of the ice core was dated back to 1920 by counting layers provided by the seasonal variations of the ions in addition to using a constant accumulation rate, with thinning by pure shear according to Nye (1963). The stratigraphy does not seem to have been obliterated by meltwater percolation, in contrast to most previous core sites on Svalbard. The anthropogenic influence on the Svalbard environment is illustrated by increased levels of sulphate, nitrate and acidity. Both nitrate and sulphate levels started to increase in the late 1940s, remained high until the late 1980s and have decreased during the last 15 years. The records of δ18O, MSA (methane-sulphonic acid), and melt features along the core agree with the temperature record from Longyearbyen and the sea-ice record from the Barents Sea at a multi-year resolution, suggesting that this ice core reflects local climatic conditions.last_img read more

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Past and future dynamics of the Brunt Ice Shelf from seabedbathymetry and ice shelf geometry

first_imgThe recent rapid growth of rifts in the Brunt Ice Shelf appears to signal the onset of its largest calving event since records began in 1915. The aim of this study is to determine whether this calving event will lead to a new steady state in which the Brunt Ice Shelf remains in contact with the bed, or an unpinning from the bed, which could predispose it to accelerated flow or possible break-up. We use a range of geophysical data to reconstruct the sea-floor bathymetry and ice shelf geometry, to examine past ice sheet configurations in the Brunt Basin, and to define the present-day geometry of the contact between the Brunt Ice Shelf and the bed. Results show that during past ice advances grounded ice streams likely converged in the Brunt Basin from the south and east. As the ice retreated, it was likely pinned on at least three former grounding lines marked by topographic highs, and transverse ridges on the flanks of the basin. These may have subsequently formed pinning points for developing ice shelves. The ice shelf geometry and bathymetry measurements show that the base of the Brunt Ice Shelf now only makes contact with one of these topographic highs. This contact is limited to an area of less than 1.3 to 3 km2 and results in a compressive regime that helps to maintain the ice shelf’s integrity. The maximum overlap between ice shelf draft and the bathymetric high is 2–25 m and is contingent on the presence of incorporated iceberg keels, which protrude beneath the base of the ice shelf. The future of the ice shelf depends on whether the expected calving event causes full or partial loss of contact with the bed and whether the subsequent response causes re-grounding within a predictable period or a loss of structural integrity resulting from properties inherited at the grounding line.last_img read more

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Time and location of Colin Kaepernick’s NFL workout changed to allow for ‘legitimate process’

first_img Written by November 16, 2019 /Sports News – National Time and location of Colin Kaepernick’s NFL workout changed to allow for ‘legitimate process’ FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPhoto by Scott Clarke / ESPN Images(ATLANTA) — Colin Kaepernick called an audible on Saturday, moving the time and location of his scheduled workout for representatives of more than 20 NFL teams, after the NFL refused to accommodate some of his requests.In a statement released by his representatives, Kaepernick said the new workout will be held at 4pm instead of 3pm, and will take place at a different location in Atlanta.“From the outset, Mr. Kaepernick requested a legitimate process and from the outset the NFL league office has not provided one,” the statement reads. “Most recently, the NFL has demanded that as a precondition to the workout, Mr. Kaepernick sign an unusual liability waiver that addresses employment-related issues and rejected the standard liability waiver from physical injury proposed by Mr. Kaepernick’s representatives.”The NFL also rejected Kaepernick’s request to allow all media into the workout for the purpose of “transparency.”Kaepernick has not played in the NFL since 2016, the year he began kneeling during the national anthem to protest police violence and racial injustice.The 32-year-old quarterback has noted previous concerns about the way the workout was arranged. He claimed he was only informed that the league planned to hold the event on Tuesday, and when his representatives requested that the workout be scheduled for a day that would allow NFL executives and coaches to more easily attend, the league rejected that idea. He also said that the league refused to provide him with a list of team representatives who planned to attend.Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.center_img Beau Lundlast_img read more

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Professor’s ‘Test the Pet’ quiz

first_imgIs man’s best friend also the most intelligent of the animals? Do goldfish really have a three second memory? Following a similar idea to Test the Nation, the BBC’s new series Test Your Pet (airing 1 May) will pit domestic animals against a series of interactive challenges to test memory, perception and initiative. The programme is the brainchild of Dr Tim Guilford, Oxford University’s leading animal behaviourist, who was recently cleared of failing to acknowledge other scientists’ research in his investigation of how pigeons use the road network to navigate. Speaking to Cherwell, Dr Guilford said the aim of the experiments was to “get people to think differently about how their pets view the world around them,” and that the study will provide “a huge amount of interesting information that may well be of use to scientists of various sorts.” Pets whose owners have Digital TV will be able to watch Pet TV, looped images designed to examine animals’ response to stimulus. The study has the potential to be one of the largest performed, as an estimated 7.5m cats and 6m dogs are kept as pets in the UK. With the majority of research focussing on wild animals, it is hoped the study will be entertaining, as well as providing an interesting insight into a neglected field of animal behaviour.ARCHIVE: 0th week TT 2004last_img read more

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St Anne’s vote for mandatory donation to homelessness charities

first_imgSt Anne’s JCR has passed a motion to include a compulsory £1 battels donation for Oxford homelessness charities each term, as well as resolving to purchase a painting by a homeless artist for college.The levy, which the JCR hopes will be introduced at other colleges, will go towards supporting charities such as Oxford Homelessness Pathways, Gatehouse and TSK Action.The motion, which states that little contributions “would amass funds capable of a huge impact and would send a powerful statement of support for Oxford’s rough sleepers”, passed with 26 votes in favour, twelve against and two abstentions.The motion was proposed in light of a recent Oxford student poll, which suggested that 98.5 per cent of Oxford students think homelessness is a problem in Oxford.It noted: “In the coming years, this situation is expected to deteriorate. Cuts in funding by Oxford City Council will result in the closing of Julian Housing, which has around 150 beds and Simon House, with 52.“Encountering rough sleepers is a sad reality we witness everyday and something that can only be effectively solved through organised action.”The motion referenced the Iffley Open House and On Your Doorstep homelessness Campaigns, which it used as examples that “student action remains a powerful and positive channel for real change”.Thomas Zagoria, the JCR’s OUSU rep, told Cherwell: “In the light of the homelessness crisis in Oxford, it was very important to respond, and I’m delighted that St Anne’s students were willing to contribute a small amount to ease the pressure on homelessness charities.”A second motion to purchase a painting specially made for St Anne’s JCR by Henry the Bus Stop Artist was passed unanimously.Henry is a homeless artist who is “known to many students and some members of the college staff”, according to the motion.The JCR will mount the artwork on the wall in the Danson Room, along with a mount, which explains the painting’s background in a bid to raise awareness of Oxford’s homelessness problem and to demonstrate St. Anne’s support.The JCR amended the original motion, promising to spend £40 on the painting and to request to have it signed.The motion, proposed by Archie Foster, said: “Supporting the homeless of Oxford is an important endeavour.“A direct action in relation to this endeavour, in conjunction with the College’s ongoing charitable eff orts, could be a symbol of the College’s stance on homelessness. In the spirit of the college, it would be honourable to purchase the painting.”last_img read more

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Local Videographer’s Passion Fuels Documentary on Life Saving Station

first_imgMartin Fiedler’s career in video spans 40 years. (Photo courtesy Justrighttv.com) By TIM KELLY  “A picture is worth a thousand words.” – Age-old sayingIf the proverbial value placed on a visual image is correct, then Martin Fiedler has created an encyclopedic history of the United States Coast Guard’s ancestor, the U.S. Life Saving Service, in a new video series.When it comes to telling stories on video, few are as accomplished or experienced as Fiedler. Thus, his broadcast-quality series documenting the Life Saving Service, its brave first responders of the day, known as Surfmen, and Ocean City’s historic Life Saving Station 30 bears the imprint of a man who cares deeply about his subject.“That is what I try to bring to every project that I take on,” says Fiedler, whose list of experiences include electronic news gathering (at the former WMGM TV-40, and as a contributor to many other news outlets), writing, and every type of commercial work imaginable.It’s an impressive resume.As is the video series on the Life Saving Station and Service. It seeks to recognize a branch of the United States government that has never received its due, and has largely been forgotten in the history books.“They were courageous men,” Lifeguard Station 30 curator John Loeper said of the surfmen.Loeper’s stories of the Service, its Ocean City station and the men who worked there are dramatically captured and woven throughout the video series.(The first installment in the new video series about Ocean City’s Life Saving Station 30, its people and its mission).Now a public museum, the station at Fourth Street and Atlantic Avenue has been meticulously and historically restored to reflect what it would have looked like and been equipped during its heyday in the late 19th and early 20th century.“They lived a lonely, spartan existence when they weren’t out making rescues,” Loeper said of the Service members. “They were paid, but they were responsible for their own food. They also had to feed the people they rescued until their relatives could be contacted and the survivors found a way to go home. So every week they would go out crabbing, clamming, fishing and hunting to bring whatever food they could into the station.”The first and future installments of the series, providing an overview of the U.S. Life Saving Service, its men, and the station in Ocean City, can be found at the Station’s website at www.uslifesavingstation30.org“John Loeper, being the foremost local expert on the station and the Life Saving Service, is crucial to the plot of the story,” says Fiedler, who captured the plot in fascinating detail.Future chapters will deal with – among other topics – the diversity of the men who served, the women who helped support the operation, the equipment, different types of shipwrecks and different types of rescues that took place routinely, when the Atlantic coast off Ocean City was one of the most treacherous stretches of the journey of ships used for hauling cargo and transporting people.An episode focuses on the most famous Ocean City shipwreck of them all, the Sindia.The U.S. Life Saving Station, now a museum, was used to rescue passengers and crew members from Ocean City shipwrecks.In addition to Loeper’s interviews, there are rare photographs and films, looks at the station’s artifacts and much more. The viewer learns that there are 470 shipwrecks off New Jersey between New York and Cape May.Fiedler’s background in TV news is evident in the style of the documentary and the delivery of its message. Though slickly produced and edited, technology never gets in the way of the story, and John Loeper is a master storyteller.“North Carolina is called the graveyard of the Atlantic, but New Jersey really is,” Loeper said. “At this station there were (on average) four wrecks a month to be dealt with. Nationwide, the Life Saving Service saved more than 170,000 people during its existence.”The series’ narration is delivered in stirring fashion by professional voiceover artist, Maryann Pionegro-Smith. Fiedler also lauded the contributions of his daughter Becca Stewart of Eyely Design, which designed and hosted the website, copywriting by Ocean City native Bette Kaminski, and his brother Steve Fiedler, who assisted on the Loeper interviews.Fiedler also produced content and set up an interactive touchscreen presentation at the Station for its visitors to learn more about the Station.“One of the great things about the story of the Station and its people is the fact there is something for anyone to relate to,” said Fiedler. “Men, women, kids, all can relate to different aspects of the story. If they visit a second or a third time they are going to keep seeing things that are new.”Fiedler, whose Just Right TV Productions is based in Mays Landing, is no rookie when it comes to projects involving Ocean City.“I’ve been producing video work in Ocean City for at least 20 years,” he said, “or approximately half of my career.”Martin Fiedler is in the center of the action during production of a construction documentation job. (Photo courtesy Martin Fiedler)In addition to his actual video productions, Fiedler’s services include video consulting, post production, documentation for construction jobs, tourism videos for municipalities and healthcare industry documentation. He can be reached through the website www.justrighttv.com.“There’s not much we haven’t done,” Fiedler said, “but we’re always willing to try something new.”That would not include this series, as Fiedler estimates he’s done “hundreds” of documentaries over the years. His experience shows. There was, however, something different about this project, he conceded.“The more I learned about the subject, the more I came to realize this story is something special. It’s an absolute privilege to help tell the story of the Station’s history and to preserve it for future generations.”last_img read more

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Greensky Bluegrass Announces Extensive Fall Tour, Will Headline At The Cap

first_imgBeloved bluegrass ensemble Greensky Bluegrass continues to impress with every note strummed. The band is among the hottest in the grass genre, and they’ll continue their tear with a stacked run of fall tour dates. The band’s newly announced fall tour spans from September 4th through November 5th, hitting venues all across the country in their quest for bluegrass domination!The tour kicks off in Chicago, IL before wrapping through the Midwest and coming to the Northeast. They’ll hit the Capitol Theatre in Port Chester, NY along the way, before heading down the East Coast and eventually making their way to Hulaween. From there, they hook left, heading out to the Pacific for a few dates on the West and ending their stacked run.We can’t wait to catch Greensky on the road! Tickets go on sale this Friday, July 15th for all dates excluding New Orleans, LA, and, for more information, you can head here. Check out the full schedule below.Enter To Win Tickets To Greensky Bluegrass At The Capitol Theatre 9/17:last_img read more

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Students to research abroad

first_imgFor some Notre Dame students, the holidays are a break from academics. But for others, the upcoming vacation affords a chance to expand upon their academic interests abroad. Senior Kalyn Fetta will travel to Italy for one week over break to conduct research on poverty alleviation in the country. “I’ll be interviewing different program directors of non-profits and NGOs in Italy, specifically religiously affiliated ones, and then I’ll actually be doing service and helping out with one of them,” she said. Fetta, a poverty studies minor who studied abroad in Rome last fall, said her research focuses on comparing and contrasting the different ways the United States and Italy attempt to address poverty and related issues. “I’ll look at the extent of services they provide, why they serve, why different members of the organization are there, their mission, their accomplishments and how they measure the effectiveness of the program,” she said. Fetta will spend the majority of her time and efforts in Rome, where she has several contacts from her time abroad at John Cabot University. She will mainly work with the Community of Sant’Egidio, an international Christian organization that serves the poor. Fetta said she met a program director of the group at Notre Dame a few weeks ago, and she will meet with him again while in Rome. “They have daily prayer services in [Basilica di] Santa Maria in Trastevere so I will meet and experience the community there,” she said. “They also focus a lot on serving the elderly so I think I’ll be making some sort of house visit with them.” She will also travel to Florence and Assisi to meet with additional organizations that assist the impoverished. A few countries west of Fetta, senior Ellen Brandenberger will spend 10 days of break researching her senior thesis in England and Wales. “I’m conducting a thesis for my history major on understandings of cultural nationalism in Wales during the Industrial Revolution,” Brandenberger said. Like Fetta, Brandenberger said she developed the idea for her research when she studied abroad in London last spring. “While I was there I did the parliamentary internship, and my boss really encouraged me to pursue research in Welsh History, with a special focus on the Industrial Revolution,” she said. To finance her research, Brandenberger applied for funds via the Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement website. She was approved and received a substantial grant from the Nanovic Institute for European Studies shortly thereafter. “I submitted a research proposal – a detailed list of expected costs and a recommendation from my thesis advisor,” Brandenberger said. “I wouldn’t say it was a difficult process, but it did force me to clarify the objectives of my research and align these goals to my advisor’s understanding of my work.” Brandenberger said the majority of the funds will subsidize her visits and access to the Parliamentary Archives and archives at the National Library of Wales, where she will use primary documents to support her thesis. Fetta also received a grant from the Nanovic Institute to support her international research. She said once she started applying for approvals and grants, she found a full support network of individuals able to provide further assistance. “Anyone I contacted would have three or four more contacts for me, even just other people around campus,” she said. “They were definitely very helpful.”last_img read more

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Governor Warns Of ‘COVID Fatigue,’ Asks Residents To Watch Family Mental Health

first_imgPixabay Stock Image.ALBANY – New York’s Governor says COVID-19 is affecting more than just physical health; it’s impacting people’s mental health too.Governor Andrew Cuomo during his press conference briefing on Wednesday called it “COVID Fatigue.”Cuomo says he is hearing stories of people dealing with emotional stress and anxiety as a result of the pandemic, but stressed that while people are getting tired, the virus isn’t.“COVID in the early stages, I think, was almost a form of adrenaline that kicks in and you do what you have to do, and you function and that gets you through,” Cuomo explained. “The adrenaline phase, and now you have this overwhelming sense and people are feeling it.” The Governor now wants New Yorkers to come together to battle COVID fatigue.He’s asking everyone to take a few minutes to call their loved ones and check in on them. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more