ojwydrni

Government rescinds decree requiring online publications to register

first_img RSF_en Receive email alerts News UkraineEurope – Central Asia News to go further Ukraine escalates “information war” by banning three pro-Kremlin media ————————————————————-Adoption of decree on online registration worrying26 May 2005Reporters Without Borders expressed concern at a new decree governing registration of websites, put forward by the Ministry of Transport and Communication, that has already come under attack from the Ukrainian media. Crimean journalist “confesses” to spying for Ukraine on Russian TV February 26, 2021 Find out more UkraineEurope – Central Asia Help by sharing this information Follow the news on Ukrainecenter_img Organisation Ukrainian media group harassed by broadcasting authority September 7, 2020 Find out more Reporters Without Borders today welcomed the Ukrainian transport and telecommunication ministry’s decision to rescind a May 2005 decree requiring online publications to register with the authorities. The requirement was a threat to free expression and had been criticised by many local news media and organisations.The ministry said the decree had been rescinded because it did not respect “the principles of state regulatory policy in the field of IT development.”Aside from a few repressive countries such as China, only Bahrain has made it obligatory for online publications to register. Reporters Without Borders and the representative on freedom of the media of the Organisation of Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) took a clear position on this issue in a joint statement about online free expression in June.They said: “Any requirement to register websites with governmental authorities is not acceptable. Unlike licensing scarce resources such as broadcasting frequencies, an abundant infrastructure like the Internet does not justify official assignment of licenses. On the contrary, mandatory registration of online publications might stifle the free exchange of ideas, opinions, and information on the Internet.” News Reporters Without Borders today welcomed the Ukrainian transport and telecommunication ministry’s decision to rescind a May 2005 decree requiring online publications to register with the authorities. The requirement was a threat to free expression and had been criticised by many local news media and organisations. The decree, put forward by the ministry on 27 April, came into effect on 18 May after it was registered with the Justice Ministry. It appeared to have been drawn up originally for both public and private sites, but then declared optional when it provoked strong criticism.Among internal critics is director general of the legal consulting firm Media House, Mykola Kniazhytski, who called it “an absurd attempt to introduce Internet censorship”. “Only a court can punish people who break laws on the Internet,” he said.Bahrain recently introduced a similar measure but appears likely to agree to amendments following widespread criticism. Compulsory registration has so far been adopted only by countries that trample free expression, such as China and Vietnam, the organisation pointed out.”This step could damage freedom of expression on the Internet. We will be watching closely to see that this registration procedure does not become obligatory for private websites,” the organisation said.To be allowed to appear, sites must not call for “a change of government through violence” or support “terrorism”, not damage individuals’ “honour”, “dignity” or “reputation” and not post “swear words” or pornographic content. Reporters Without Borders said the language is however too vague to guarantee press freedom if it were to be applied to private websites.The decree, adopted on 18 May, also specifies that an “administrator” will decide on the registration of the website, opening the way to administrative censorship of the Internet, said the organisation.”The way the decree is worded appears to suggest that all electronic media – private and public – will be forced to register in future. A recent statement from the Ministry of Transport and Communication that it would only be compulsory for government-run sites, has not completely reassured us,” it said.”We therefore wish to make our position clear on this. Demanding that those running private sites make themselves known to the authorities, linking their registration to a series of vague conditions, will push most of them into secrecy and others into self-censorship. In any case this type of measure should be debated by Ukraine’s parliament and not the subject of a simple government decree,” it said. March 26, 2021 Find out more October 11, 2005 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Government rescinds decree requiring online publications to register Newslast_img read more

sgqthsga

Telecom authority accused of concealing blocked website figures

first_img News News News News TurkeyEurope – Central Asia April 2, 2021 Find out more Organisation Human rights groups warns European leaders before Turkey summit Follow the news on Turkey Help by sharing this information Reporters Without Borders supports the legal action that Yaman Akdeniz, an Internet law professor at Istanbul’s Bilgi University, has brought against the High Council for Telecommunications (TIB) for failing to provide figures for the number of websites censored since May 2009. Akdeniz has filed his complaint before an administrative court under Law 4982 on the right to information.“More transparency from the authorities about website blocking is essential,” Reporters Without Borders said. “The TIB provides information about the content on the blocked websites but omits the most important information, the number of websites that have been blocked. This deliberate lack of transparency is disturbing and we call on the authorities to reveal and explain the scale of the current censorship.”The number of websites that had been blocked under Law 5651 on cyber-crime was 433 in May 2008. A year later, the number of blocked websites had risen to 2,601. But the TIB has not released any figures for blocked websites since then. The Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) puts the number of websites blocked for arbitrary and political reasons at 3,700.The blocking of some websites, especially YouTube in May 2008, has been the subject of major protests in the blogosphere and the traditional media. The Ankara-based Association of Internet Technologies has filed a complaint about website blocking before the European Court of Human Rights, accusing the Turkish authorities of violating freedom of expression.On 11 March, Turkey was added to the list of “countries under surveillance” by Reporters Without Borders because of their Internet policies. The list is released each year at the same time as the list of “Enemies of the Internet” (http://en.rsf.org/surveillance-turkey,36675.html).center_img RSF_en Receive email alerts April 2, 2021 Find out more Turkey’s never-ending judicial persecution of former newspaper editor May 19, 2010 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Telecom authority accused of concealing blocked website figures Journalists threatened with imprisonment under Turkey’s terrorism law TurkeyEurope – Central Asia to go further April 28, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more