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Badgers ready for final regular season home series against Minnesota-Duluth

first_imgIn its last home series of the regular season, the Wisconsin women’s hockey team is set to take on Minnesota-Duluth this weekend, with both teams looking to get a leg up in the race for a playoff spot.Sitting in third place in the WCHA, the No. 8 Badgers (17-9-2, 13-9-2 WCHA) are just two points out of second place behind North Dakota (45 points). Facing off against them is a Bulldog team (14-11-3, 13-10-1 WCHA) that trails UW by three points in the league standings.While No. 1 Minnesota has run away with the regular season WCHA title, home-ice advantage is still very much up for grabs for the conference tournament, and every win will help either team reach the NCAA tournament come March.“The nice thing about it, we have control over where we want to go. If you’re successful the next couple of weekends, get yourself in the playoffs, you’re playing well you’re healthy, the opportunities are out there,” head coach Mark Johnson said at his Monday press conference. “As a coach and as a team, that’s all you can ask for.”Last time on the ice, the Badgers trounced St. Cloud State on the road with 6-0 and 5-1 wins last weekend. Wisconsin found success on its power play throughout the series, putting away four goals – three of which came in game two – with the man-advantage.After losing three of its previous four game heading into last week, UW needed to get back to the basics, and for Johnson the weekend was important for establishing a base for a playoff run.“Coming off what I thought was six very good periods up in St. Cloud. I like the way we played. A lot of good things happened within both Friday and Saturday’s game,” Johnson said Monday. “It bodes well because at this time of the year is when you want to be playing your best hockey. We’re going down that path right now.”However Minnesota-Duluth will be no easy opponent to take down. The Bulldogs find themselves in need of a boost after splitting a series with Minnesota State-Mankato last weekend at home, and being swept by Minnesota the weekend before.Historically Wisconsin holds a 26-29-10 all-time record against the Bulldogs. Back in mid-October the Bulldogs swept UW and held the Badgers scoreless through both games. However in four months both teams have evolved and with the programs so close in standings, fans will likely see two hard-fought games this weekend.Emotions will also run high, as the upcoming series marks the last regular season home games Wisconsin’s five senior players will face off in. Forwards Brianna Decker, Alev Kelter and Lauren Unser, along with defensemen Saige Pacholok and Jordan Brickner will be honored at Sunday’s game. For Johnson it is hard to imagine their four years are almost up.“You look at your senior class and you can remember when they first stepped on campus as freshman and their parents hugged them and letting them go. … That’s certainly an emotional day,” Johnson said Monday. “And you will see the same thing Sunday, when those families come back into town and they watch their daughters step on the ice and play their last regular season games. You think wow, where did those four years go”?The team will face off Saturday night at 7 p.m. at LaBahn Arena and return to the ice Sunday at 4 p.m. for game two of the series.last_img read more

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United States EPA, Enbridge reach settlement over 2010 oil spills

first_imgThe governments complaint was that Enbridge did not act quickly enough when the incidents occurred.Advertisement Those measures are:•           Implement an enhanced pipeline inspection and spill prevention program•           Implement enhanced measures to improve leak detection and control room operations•           Commit to additional leak detection and spill prevention requirements for a portion of Enbridge’s Line 5 that crosses the Straits of Mackinac in Michigan.Advertisement “The government’s complaint alleges that Enbridge owned or operated a 30 inch-pipeline, known as Line 6B, that ruptured near Marshall on July 25, 2010, discharging oil into the environment. Although the Line 6B rupture triggered numerous alarms in Enbridge’s control room, Enbridge failed to recognize a pipeline had ruptured until at least 17 hours later. In the meantime, Enbridge had restarted Line 6B on two separate occasions on July 26, 2010, pumping additional oil into the ruptured pipeline causing additional discharges of oil into the environment. Ultimately, Line 6B discharged at least 20,082 barrels of crude oil, much of which entered Talmadge Creek and flowed into the Kalamazoo River which flows to Lake Michigan. Flooding caused by heavy rains pushed the discharged oil over the river’s banks into its flood plains, and accelerated its migration over 35 miles downstream before it was contained. Enbridge later replaced Line 6B, which originates in Griffith, Ind., crosses the lower peninsula of Michigan and ends in Sarnia, Canada, with a new, larger pipeline, also known as Line 6B. The rupture and discharges were caused by stress corrosion cracking on the pipeline, control room misinterpretations and other problems, and pervasive organization failures at Enbridge.The complaint also alleges that on September 9, 2010, another Enbridge pipeline, known as Line 6A, discharged at least 6,427 barrels of oil which Romeoville, Ill., much of which flowed through a drainage ditch into a retention pond in Romeoville.”Cynthia Giles, Assistant Administrator for EPA’s Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance says this settlement will make sure these incidents do not happen again in the future.“This agreement puts in place advanced leak detection and monitoring requirements to make sure a disaster like this one doesn’t happen again. This comprehensive program – including an independent third party to audit compliance – will protect our waterways and the people who depend on them.” •           Create and maintain an integrated database for its Lakehead Pipeline System•           Enhance its emergency spill response preparedness programs by conducting four emergency spill response exercises to test and practice Enbridge’s response to a major inland oil spill•           Improve training and coordination with state and local emergency responders by requiring incident command system training for employees, provide training to local responders, participate in area response planning and organize response exercises•           Hire an independent third party to assist with review of implementation of the requirements in the settlement agreement WASHINGTON, D.C. – Enbridge and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have reached an agreement regarding 2 oil spills back in 2010.The oil spills happened in Marshall, Michigan and Romeoville, Illinois.Under the settlement, Enbridge has agreed to pay at least $110 million in measures “to prevent spills and improve operations across nearly 2,000 miles of its pipeline system in the Great Lakes region.”- Advertisement -Enbridge will also be paying fines of $62 million for Clean Water Act violations and $61 million for million for spilling at least 20,082 barrels of oil in Marshall and $1 million for discharging at least 6,427 barrels of oil in Romeoville. They will also be paying $5.4 million in non-reimbursed costs that were paid by the government to cleanup the Marshall spill, they will also pay any costs that occur from that spill in the future.In a statement, the EPA says Enbridge must also now adhere to strict guidelines.“Today’s settlement includes an extensive set of specific requirements to prevent spills and enhance leak detection capabilities throughout Enbridge’s Lakehead pipeline system – a network of 14 pipelines spanning nearly 2,000 miles across seven states. Enbridge must also take major actions to improve its spill preparedness and emergency response programs. Under the settlement, Enbridge is also required to replace close to 300 miles of one of its pipelines, after obtaining all necessary approvals. Enbridge’s Lakehead System delivers approximately 1.7 million barrels of oil in the United States each day.”Advertisementlast_img read more