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Vermont legislators honor Lund Family Center for 120 Years

first_imgOn March 24, Lund clients, staff, legislators, trustees and friends joined together in the Cedar Creek Room at the Vermont State House, to celebrate Lund Family Center’s services to families throughout Vermont at the kick-off celebration honoring Lund’s 120th Anniversary Year.  Event Co-Chairs Jeanne Kennedy and Kit Stone cut the congratulatory cake and served it to the large group of supporters and friends gathered in tribute to Lund’s mission and accomplishments. A resolution had been adopted earlier in the day in the Vermont House of Representatives to recognize Lund’s dedication to strengthening families and helping children thrive.  The resolution was sponsored by Rep. Johanna Leddy Donovan of Burlington, a former member of the LFC Board of Trustees, and co-sponsored by over sixty House members, who represented a full spectrum of legislators. Guests paid tribute to Lund’s longevity and successes. Board President Eileen Simollardes commented that “If the ten women who founded Lund 120 years ago could see us now…these were women who lived all over Vermont, they had no vote or immediate means of transportation, yet they managed to gather to establish a unique organization that endures and continues to flourish.”  Lt. Governor Brian Dubie commented that the resolution was earned and shared his best wishes for another 120 years of great work.  Senate President Pro Tem Peter Shumlin called Lund Family Center the crown jewel of Vermont promising to do everything the legislators can in the State House to keep Lund strong.  Speaker of the House Shap Smith commented on the importance of Lund‘s service to all Vermonters, noting that the Legislature would continue its support of Lund’s mission.  Smith encouraged those present to stay involved, step up and support Lund’s activities and write that check that will ensure that Lund can continue its outstanding services to Vermont’s families. Since its founding in 1890, Lund has kept pace with shifts in the social fabric of our community.  Event Co-Chair Kit Stone said “… the definition of family has evolved in the past 120 years, and with that, so have Lund’s programs and services, yet we remain true to our mission of strengthening Vermont families.”  Executive Director Barbara Rachelson described “how many hours of passion and dedication have been spent over the years to make the lives of Vermonters better.”  Kim Coe, Director of Residential and Community Treatment programs summed it up well saying, “who knew we would be receiving awards for exceptional outcomes…we did.”A Brief HistoryLund Family Center was founded 120 years ago by a committed group of women affliated with the Women’s Christian Temperance Union.  Originally called “The Home for Friendless Women,” Lund was a maternity home where women hid during their pregnancies, gave birth and placed their child for adoption.  Reference to Lund was often spoken of in whispers and the work at the home was shrouded in secrecy due to the stigma of unwed motherhood which prevailed at the turn of the century. In fact, well into the 1950s a bowl of wedding rings was kept by the door for residents to don when going out into the community. Over 120 years Lund Family Center has facilitated more than 8,600 adoptions and served more than 50,000 people with residential treatment, high school and GED preparation, childcare, job training and independent living programs.  The impact of Lund’s work is felt across Vermont and the country.  Vermont’s oldest and largest private adoption agency, Lund is the state’s only residential program where women can receive mental health and substance abuse treatment under the same roof as their child.   Anywhere else, mothers are separated from their children yet outcomes improve when families remain intact, as they do when receiving services through Lund’s programs. The strength of Lund’s work and impact of its services lies in the breadth of support the organization extends to families regardless of their parenting choice.  The contemporary approach to individualized treatment further strengthens Lund’s ability to customize services to meet the specific needs and goals of each client.# # #last_img read more

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Maria Tritou and Gabriella Knutson use backhand shot to elevate game

first_img Published on April 21, 2016 at 12:33 am Contact Jake: [email protected] After Maria Tritou ripped a two-handed backhand down the sideline, Virginia Tech’s Kelly Williford stumbled while reaching for the ball. Her arms were fully extended as she couldn’t catch up with the rocket shot. Williford then approached the green tarp behind the court as the ball collided into it.All Williford could do is pick up the ball and walk back to the line for the next point. And even though Tritou eventually lost the match, her backhand is what helped make a comeback attempt. That same backhand is what’s helped elevate her game during Syracuse’s five wins in their last six conference games.Seventh-seeded SU (13-7, 7-7 Atlantic Coast) opens the ACC Tournament on Thursday at 10 a.m. in Cary, North Carolina against No. 10 seed North Carolina State (15-10, 6-8) and will look to Tritou and Gabriella Knutson to continue using their backhand shot to pay dividends in the postseason.Knutson says that going to the backhand gives her more velocity on her shots that she doesn’t have with other stances and moves. The move allows Knutson to adapt to in game situations and from player to player.“I definitely get more power (from the backhand),” Knutson said. “I feel much more confident in it. I have (the ability to use) two hands and the backhand gives me (more versatility).”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textWhen Knutson goes to her backhand, the velocity drastically increases. The speed of the ball has consistently frozen opponents and the control that Knutson has with her backhand has allowed for pinpoint placement of balls throughout the court. This versatility and ability to alter the approach of every shot with such consistency has lead Knutson to the best record on the team at 14-5.Tritou too has also developed a highly successful backhand that has allowed her to become another go-to option on the team when Knutson, Valeria Salazar or Anna Shkudun are off their game. She’s won three of her last six games to close out the regular season.Tritou echoed Knutson and feels that her backhand has a more natural feel to it. As a baseline player who likes to have quick returns down the lines of the court, the backhand has become a weapon that surprises opponents before they can react.“It depends on how you feel,” Tritou said. “… I feel more comfortable with my backhand.”Head coach Younes Limam said Tritou and Knutson simply have better backhands than other players on the team. By sticking to their strengths they’re successful by allowing them to transfer their weight and get off an effective, accurate shot.“They lean through the ball more (than others),” Limam said. “They hit through the ball more using less spin.”And with the postseason coming up, assistant coach Shelley George expects Tritou and Knutson to stick with what’s worked.“It will always be their favorite shot,” George said. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Cloughaneely and Naomh Conaill unite in wearing Green Ribbons for mental health

first_imgPlayers from both Cloughaneely and Naomh Conaill showed their support for mental health awareness on Sunday by sporting a green ribbon on their jerseys for their division one clash.The notion was brought forward by Stephen Doohan, the health and well-being officer at the Cloughaneely club. He got the idea from the Donegal game the previous Sunday and felt it was an important matter and certainly one that needed discussed.After getting the green-light from referee Robbie O’Donnell before the game, both teams wore the green ribbons on the sleeve of their jerseys. Doohan who featured in the reserve game on the day stated that he felt it was an important gesture to make in order to help with raising awareness for mental health.“I can’t claim the full idea as Kevin Mulhern suggested that the players wear them on the sleeve of the jersey after I proposed we wore them on our tracksuits to the game,” he said.“I thought that was a much more powerful statement to make so we ran with it. I then decided to get in contact with Martin Regan just to pass it by him and he also thought it was a great idea.”The annual Green Ribbon Campaign takes place every May, and aims to get people talking openly about mental health problems. This campaign promotes open conversation about mental health and it challenges the associated stigma that sometimes comes with it. More than 500,000 free green ribbons are distributed every year to spark a national conversation about mental health in boardrooms, canteens, and around kitchen tables throughout Ireland.Doohan went on to say that every club and sport alike should try their best to wear the ribbon for the month of May and do their best to support the cause.“It’s really important to raise awareness, it’s said that one in four will have a mental health issue in their lifetime.“I suppose we all have challenges every day and life can be stressful from time to time be it work, financial, home, relationships whatever.“Following on from the great work that Darkness Into Light do it’s just another little touch and if it helps even one person to talk about their problems then it will have been worthwhile,” he concluded. Cloughaneely and Naomh Conaill unite in wearing Green Ribbons for mental health was last modified: May 23rd, 2018 by Chris CannonShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Cloughaneelygreen ribbon monthMental Health awarenessNaomh Conailllast_img read more