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Ulster sign Callum Black and Michael McComish

first_imgMcComish attended Campbell College and went on to play a key role in the Ballymena team that won the All Ireland Division One league in 2004. The 27 year old has played for Ireland at U-21 level and has also represented the Ireland 7’s side.Ulster’s Director of Rugby David Humphreys said; “We’re delighted to announce that Callum and Michael will be joining us and strangthening our squad ahead of next season. he said “Having spent the last few seasons with Connacht, Michael has gained a lot of Magners League experience while Callum has expereince from the Premiership, the Championship as well as the LV and Amlin Challenge Cup competitions and so will be a very useful addition to our front row.” TAGS: Ulster BELFAST, NORTHERN IRELAND – MARCH 04: General View of Ulster Magners League match between Ulster and Aironi at Ravenhill on March 04, 2011 in Belfast, Northern Ireland. (Photo by Patrick Bolger/Getty Images for Arioni) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Michael McComish will join Ulster from Connacht where he has played for the past two seasons. He is an accomplished Number 8 but can play anywhere in the back row. A former development player within the Ulster Squad, he had spells with both Rotherham and Otley in England before joining Connacht ahead of the start of the 2009-10 season. Ravenhill Stadium – Home to UlsterUlster Rugby today confirmed that Callum Black and Michael McComish will join the squad in the summer, ahead of the start of the 2011-12 season.Callum Black (25) is an Irish-qualified prop who is currently contracted with Championship side Worcester Warriors. Born in the USA and raised in England where he attended Hartpury College, Black is Irish-qualified through his paternal grandfather who was originally from Belfast and has represented Ireland at U18, U19 and U21 levels.He joined the Worcester Academy straight from College and burst onto the senior scene towards the end of the 2008-09 season. In all he has made 50 appearances in the front row for the club and has had loan spells at both Otley and Plymouth. “This is a new and exciting challenge for me”commented Black. “I’m at the stage in my career where I’m looking to really push on and I’m really looking forward to playing in the Magners League and Heineken Cup” “I’ve watched Ulster this season and been very impressed with how the team is developing and I’m looking forward to being part of that.” “My goal is to establish myself in the Ulster team and then try to force my way into the Ireland set up.”last_img read more

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Six Nations: Ireland 28 – 6 Scotland

first_imgStuart Hogg; Dougie Fife, Alex Dunbar, Duncan Taylor, Sean Lamont; Duncan Weir, Greig Laidlaw; Ryan Grant, Ross Ford, Moray Low, Tim Swinson, Jim Hamilton, Kelly Brown, John Barclay, David Denton.If Sean Maitland is not fit, Dougie Fife could step up from the Scotland A side to the first team. The back row could be reshuffled, with John Barclay coming in at No 7, Kelly Brown moving to blindside and Ryan Wilson dropping out. Hanging on: Max Evans stops Jamie Heaslip on this occasion but the No 8 still led Ireland to a winby Katie Field, at the Aviva StadiumThe match in 30 secondsIreland opened their RBS Six Nations campaign with a convincing win over Scotland, leading from the 22nd minute and stretching away, out of sight, in the second half. The Ireland pack stole five Scotland lineouts and two Scotland scrums and unlike last year’s clash between these two nations, they manufactured scores from their possession rather than squandering it.A try from Andrew Trimble put Ireland 11-3 up at half-time and further tries after the break from stand-in captain Jamie Heaslip – called upon to lead the team after Paul O’Connell dropped out with a chest infection – and Rob Kearney were more than enough for Ireland.Scotland’s best chance of a try came when David Denton was bundled into touch in the right-hand corner on the half-hour. Incisive running from Stuart Hogg and Sean Lamont made inroads into the Ireland defence but could not break it completely.Ireland – Tries: Andrew Trimble, Jamie Heaslip, Rob Kearney. Pens: Jonny Sexton (three). Cons: Sexton (two).Scotland – Pens: Greig Laidlaw (2)Ouch! Sean Maitland and Kearney clashPost-match bulletin– Ireland full-back Rob Kearney celebrated his 50th cap with a try, while Brian O’Driscoll became Ireland’s most capped player of all time, playing his 129th Test.– Leinster prop Martin Moore made his Ireland debut, coming on for Mike Ross in the 63rd minute.– Scotland’s Stuart Hogg and David Denton were the joint top ball-carriers in the match, with 13 each. Ireland’s best carrier was RBS Man of the Match Jamie Heaslip, with 11.– Three players topped the tackler charts en masse – Brian O’Driscoll, Kelly Brown and Tim Swinson, with 14 each. DUBLIN, IRELAND – NOVEMBER 24: Paul O’Connell of Ireland looks on during the International match between Ireland and New Zealand All Blacks at the Aviva Stadium on November 24, 2013 in Dublin, Ireland. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS – Sean Maitland limped off in the 32nd minute after an aerial clash with Dave Kearney. He appeared to suffer a knee injury and a possible concussion and so is doubtful for next Saturday’s Calcutta Cup game.What’s next?– For Scotland it’s the same old problem: finding a way to turn possession and half-chances into points. Coach Scott Johnson was pleased with the way they disrupted Ireland in the first half-hour and with their approach play, but frustrated at their inability to cross the try-line.– In many ways it was a good day at the office for Ireland but they did concede ten turnovers to Scotland so will be trying to tighten up the breakdown area before they take on Wales next weekend.– The loss of two scrums and five lineouts was a disappointment for the Scotland pack, so they will need to be more secure in their set pieces next weekend.RW’s proposed Ireland XV to play Wales:Sick-note: Paul O’Connell should be backRob Kearney; Andrew Trimble, Brian O’Driscoll, Luke Marshall, Dave Kearney; Jonathan Sexton, Conor Murray; Cian Healy, Rory Best, Mike Ross, Devin Toner, Paul O’Connell, Peter O’Mahony, Chris Henry, Jamie Heaslip.Paul O’Connell will return to the second row assuming he recovers from his chest infection in time. Ireland may not make any other changes to their winning team.RW’s proposed Scotland XV to play England:last_img read more

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Five things we learned about rugby – June

first_imgChanging times: Pontypridd are the dominant side in the Principality PremiershipThe Welsh Premiership is no longer about elite achievement; it is a structure that must exist to benefit the Welsh development structure as a whole. Wales’ Premiership teams no longer need to see their competition as each other, their competition is Toulon, Saracens and Glasgow. Success should be judged, and rewarded financially, by the amount and quality of players that they provide to the elite game. Without the successful pollination of players from the Premiership into the professional clubs in Wales – there will be no competitive rugby in Wales in 30 years. Unless the Premiership teams can swallow their role as feeder clubs for the regions above, Welsh rugby in its entirety may have to stomach being a feeder region for French and English club rugby. High jinks: Should the lift be used more innovately in today’s game?For example the ‘lift’ could be a potent weapon against defensive box kicks, whose telegraphed nature mean that they can be read 10 seconds before they’re actually executed – the simple lifting of a lock, by a ruck guard, would cause a significant problem for the scrum half. The propensity for low trajectory, ‘end on end’, clearance kicks could also be hampered by the use of a defensive lift. The defensive lift could also help with the collection of box kicks where the relative predictability of the ‘target zone’ means that a lifter could be employed in the same way as it is in a restart. Food for thought in the build up to the Rugby World Cup.The All Blacks’ announce their ‘wider’ squad.The last four weeks have seen all of the major players announce their training squads. But whilst Wales, South Africa, Australia, England, Ireland etc have announced wider squads, it was the All Blacks that announced a ‘deeper’ squad. The 41-man training man squad has such depth that it can only be fully appreciated from a naval submarine. The All Blacks haven’t merely named a squad; they have named two XV’s that could make the semi-finals of the Rugby World Cup.Strength-in-depth: Aaron Smith is one of many world-class players in the ABs wider squadIt’s a group which doesn’t look like a list of personal bests in the gym or players reliant on body mass – it’s two buses full of players who have the most effective skillsets in the world. The ultimate blend of technical specialism, handling, speed and power. If you have a moment, try and imagine which players from your nation would actually fit into the All Blacks’ squad – they will be few and far between. The All Blacks are the overwhelming favourites for the Rugby World Cup and don’t let anyone tell you any different.Welsh Premiership revampedThe Welsh Premiership’s revamp was confirmed on the final day in June. From 2016/17 the number of clubs in the Premiership will be increased from 12 teams to up to a total of 16, plus the LV Cup and British and Irish Cup will now feature ‘select’ teams from each region. But whilst the restructure is obviously important, it is the wider issue of the Premiership’s change in role that must remain the focus. The legendary clubs of Welsh rugby such as Pontypridd, Swansea, Neath etc now exist in a rugby landscape that can longer afford to place glorious histories at the expense of fragile futures. Sonny Bill Williams needs to stop switching.June saw speculation that Sonny Bill Williams will once again make another career change. The ‘Mr Ben’ (gratuitous Eighties reference) of Southern Hemisphere rugby could join Liam Messam as part of New Zealand’s 7s squad for the Rio Olympics – adding to a resume that includes rugby union league and boxing. But while this decision would reinforce his reputation as one of the most versatile athletes in the world, he risks becoming the ‘World Buffet’ of sport. The personification of those restaurants which serve up Chinese, Indian, Italian, American and Thai cuisine in one lukewarm serving. The sort of joint where you wander around picking at an initially mesmerising offering, but where the individual elements aren’t quite up to scratch.Loyalty card: Israel Folau has just committed to the Wallabies for the next three-yearsIn contrast, Israel Folau has signed a three-year extension with the Australian Rugby Union and will continue what has been a remarkable switch from Rugby League and Australian Rules to rugby union. Whilst both players entered union as code hoppers, Israel Folau has become a genuine force in Australian rugby. His performances in this year’s Super Rugby have been exemplary and his ability under the high ball, stunning lateral movement and meticulous offload game have resulted in him being guaranteed a starting spot for the Wallabies – SBW mean while finds himself looking at a bench position, at best, with the All Blacks. SBW needs to decide if he wants to be Chateaubriand or a chicken curry pizza.Super Rugby dream finalJune saw Super Rugby secure the final that everyone wanted. Whether you’re from South Africa, South Island, New South Wales or the original South Wales, no one can argue that the Hurricanes and the Highlanders aren’t the best teams in this year’s competition. Waisake Naholo, Aaron Smith, Ma’a Nonu and Nehe Milner-Skudder have played the simplest, yet most exquisite rugby of the season. The Hurricane’s backline have taken passing to an almost ‘arcade-like’ level deserving of inclusion in the Android remake of NBA Jam.Different level: The Hurricanes and the Highlanders are deservedly in the Super Rugby finalWhilst the Highlanders’ forwards have demonstrated an offload game that Northern Hemisphere backs are rarely capable of. But above all, both teams make a mockery of this notion that Super Rugby teams don’t complete enough tackles. They simply redefine the idea of a missed tackle. The manner in which both the ‘Landers and ‘Canes attack space and pass before contact, particularly behind the gain line, means that tackles aren’t missed – they are merely unable to me made. Roll on Saturday.Should rugby make more use of ‘lifting’?The season has already seen the world’s elite rugby coaches push, tweak and bend rugby’s laws in remarkable ways. This year’s innovations have tended towards the contact area and the issue of engagement with regards to the offside rule – the Chief’s (NZ) have been particularly impressive in this this area. Yet one aspect which still seems to remain unexploited is the ‘lift’. Whilst the effectiveness of lifting players at restarts and lineouts is obvious, its application in other areas of the game remain largely untapped. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img This month we’re discussing Sonny Bill Williams, Super Rugby excitement, All Black strength-in-depth and lifting in rugby… Jack of all trades: Is Sonny Bill spreading himself too thin in his quest for silverware? last_img read more

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Six Nations Round 2: Six players to watch

first_img Ain’t no stopping me now: BIlly Vunipola carries hard against Ireland LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The Six Nations is warming up and this weekend all eyes will be on Paris, Cardiff and Rome as the tournament unfolds. Here are six players expected to make a big impression Carlo Canna (Italy)Carlo Canna made his Six Nations debut on Saturday at the Stade de France, and marked it by racking up 13 points. He dotted down for a second-half try when his out-stretched arms caught a pass from Edoardo Gori and he dived over from close range. Canna converted his own try, and dispatched a penalty and a drop goal in what was almost a historic first ever victory for the Azzurri in Paris.Dream Six Nations debut: Carlo Canna scored a try and dropped a goal in an eye-catching performanceThe leggy 23-year-old was on the end of some fulsome praise from England coach Eddie Jones this week, with the Australian comparing him to Stephen Larkham. “Compliments are nice, but Jones’ tactics could actually be to try to increase the pressure on me ahead of Sunday,” straight-batted Canna. Despite the promising performance, Canna will need to brush up on his kicking game this week after missing two attempts at goal against France.Virimi Vakatawa (France)Having become a star on the Sevens circuit, Virimi Vakatawa was parachuted in by new French coach Guy Noves ain an attempt to re-install some va va voom in French rugby. The Fijian-born Vakatwa duly delivered, dotting down for the first try of this year’s Six Nations when he found himself with the ball on the left flank and displayed some clever footwork to evade a tackle from Leonardo Sarto and put France ahead.Power-packed: Virimi Vakatawa brought the Parisien crowd to their feetAnd it wasn’t long before Vakatwa had become the darling of the French crowd, with excitement ringing around the Stade de France whenever the winger got the ball in his hands. Ireland’s Dave Kearney has cited the shutting down of the French flyer as key to Irish hopes of achieving back-to-back Six Nations victories in Paris on Saturday.”You know that he’s got a real threat from the fact he’s thrived in Sevens,” said Kearney, who starts for Ireland on Saturday.“Give someone like that space and they’ll cause you trouble.”center_img Sean O’Brien (Ireland)Ireland’s vice captain, and the man they call the ‘Tullow Tank’ is back in Irish colours this weekend after recovering from a hamstring injury. Tommy O’Donnell makes way in the starting XV for O’Brien after filling in for the first round of fixtures, despite the Munster man putting in a notable shift for the Irish against Wales.Battering ram: Sean O’Brien will bring his physicality to the FrenchBritish & Irish Lion O’Brien is an experience breakdown specialist, forcing two turnovers in his last appearance against France in the 2015 Rugby World Cup. He could be a target for some French retribution after his punch on lock Pascal Pape in the very same match saw him banned for the quarter-final. O’Brien’s ball-carrying can be devastating. He scored two tries in Ireland’s 40-10 victory over Scotland during the final day of last year’s Six Nations; a victory that gave the men in green their second successive Six Nations title. By David MarshAlun-Wyn Jones (Wales)Wales’ forwards coach Robin McBryde recently described 95-cap veteran Alun Wyn Jones as the totemic Welsh equivalent of Ireland’s Paul O’Connell – a more than fair comparison given Jones’ commitment in a Welsh shirt over the years. And not that the modest lock would ever boast about it, but he became Wales’ most capped second-row ever during the 2015 Rugby World Cup, surpassing Gareth Llewellyn’s haul of 92 caps.Trucking it up: Alun Wyn Jones puts his body on the line, time after timeJones, 30, was his consistent self last weekend, making 16 tackles in a bruising encounter with Ireland last week as Wales drew with Joe Schmidt’s side, but the Osprey faces the double threat of the Gray brothers, who together won 58 line-outs last year.Stuart Hogg (Scotland)Scotland continued their miserable try scoring record against England at Murrayfield on Saturday, having not crossed the whitewash against England at home since 2004. However it is not creativity Scotland struggle with. Finn Russell, Mark Bennett, and Tommy Seymour can all offer some zip in the Scottish back-line. Scotland’s problem is putting end product to their attacks, especially against Six Nations competition.On the gallop: Stuart Hogg races away to score a try against WalesStuart Hogg‘s try against Wales at Murrayfield last year showed that Stuart Hogg is capable of finishing half-chances. A quick Scottish turnover from past the half-way line saw Hogg streak down the left wing and dot the ball down under the posts. The 23-year-old has a point to prove after seeing red early on in this fixture two years ago, and could only watch from the sidelines as the Scots were dismantled by an unforgiving Welsh team, losing 51-3. Typically, Hogg was Scotland’s main threat last week against England, carrying the ball 101 metres and beating five defenders, and his ballerina-like footwork could cause Wales all sorts of problems this weekend.Billy Vunipola (England)The England No 8 put in one of the most eye-catching performances of the opening weekend with a man of the match display in England’s victory at Murrayfield. Billy Vunipola led from the front for the English last weekend. He made a total of 51 metres with ball in hand in a tireless effort in heavy traffic. He also contributed in defence, making a total of nine tackles.Juggernaut: Billy Vunipola carried up the guts of the Scottish defence time and time againThe former Wasps player has also played a major role in a Saracens team that have dominated the European Champions Cup this season. He took part in five of Saracen’s six pool matches and scored three tries, one of which – in the victory against Ulster at home – sealed Saracens qualification to the quarter-finals. However, this weekend Vunipola will get the opportunity to test himself against 115-time cap Italian icon Sergio Parisse, a stern test for the 23-year-old.last_img read more

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England v Wales: Red Rosers have it all to prove in chase for Six Nations Grand Slam

first_img Crunching metal: Cousins Billy Vunipola and Taulupe Faletau go head to head again on Saturday (Pic: AFP) Eddie Jones has assembled a reasonably experienced side, says Adam Hathaway. But can they stay cool in the white heat of a must-win match to stay on track for a Grand Slam? LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Eddie Jones has changed a few things around since pitching up before Christmas but no matter how much money the RFU has, they can’t buy experience by chucking a load of cash at the team.But somehow Jones has come up with a XV for Saturday’s game against Wales loaded with 527 caps for their country.Warren Gatland will unload 675 Test appearances onto the Old Cabbage Patch at the weekend and, on Tuesday, Welsh centre Jamie Roberts summed up the difference between the two teams.Roberts said: “Where the stakes have been at their highest, notably 2013 and last year’s World Cup, we have delivered. There’s now a lot of experience and guys who have played in big moments. To be able to concentrate your focus and attention when the stakes are at their highest is something you can only learn with experience.”Shouting the odds: Jamie Roberts was right when pointing out Wales’ ability to deliver on the big occasionRoberts is right. His side have delivered when the pressure is on in the Six Nations. Jones’s team – although not on his watch – have played three massive games, two against Wales and one against Australia, in the past three years and botched the lot of them.Woodward’s mighty team famously blew Slams in 1999, 2000 and 2001 before coming good but this England side are learning on the hoof. The fixture list has been kind to them, with a new boss able to bed in new systems against Scotland and Italy before hosting an injury-hit Irish side.But only eight of this England starting line-up were in Cardiff in 2013 and the same number started against Wales in the World Cup. Those exams were flunked and none of them have got a pass mark in a really big Test match. The Welsh have earned their spurs alright and that is making this Englishman a bit nervous.center_img Martin Johnson didn’t make a whole lot of friends in 2003 when his England side broke protocol and stood in the wrong place at Lansdowne Road against Ireland, leading to some dirty shoes for the Irish president Mary McAleese, but they won a Grand Slam with their 42-6 win.They then peaked on the summer tour against Australia and New Zealand, before winning the World Cup without playing at their best later in the year. Since then nish, nada, nothing, apart from a Six Nations title in 2011, as the Grand Slam has remained as elusive as ever.Since Johnson’s gnarled old mob ruled the roost, Wales have won Slams in 2005, 2008 and 2012, France did the honours in 2004 and 2010, and Ireland emulated their 1948 heroes in 2009. If you beat England with a ‘more money and players than anyone else’ stick then that’s a pretty pathetic return.Rubbing it in: Wales have won three Grand Slams since England’s last one 13 years ago (Pic: Getty)Andy Robinson, Brian Ashton, Johnson and Stuart Lancaster have been in charge since Clive Woodward left Twickenham in 2004 but all have drawn a blank in the Grand Slam stakes. But it’s not as if they haven’t had chances.From 2004 to 2010 England lost two or three matches in every championship as they failed dismally to capitalise on the exploits of Johnson and his mates. Since then they have lost a single Six Nations game each year but have only been involved in two final weekend matches when the Slam was on the line.In 2011 they travelled to Dublin with a starting line-up made up of just 313 England caps, lost 24-8 and were never in the game.Two years later, in Cardiff, they imploded 30-3 with Lancaster’s run-on team boasting just 290 caps and a coach (Lancaster) who admitted he had never been to a big game at the Millennium Stadium. This was the same boss who told us, when he was appointed, that the world-beating teams had 650-plus caps when they crossed the whitewash. Again, never in the game.New ground: Maro Itoje has just two caps to his name and will face a vastly experienced Welsh second rowThe England team of 2003 was awash with caps, 620 for their country, at the start of the Lansdowne Road game, and had European Cup winners and blokes who had played crucial parts in the 1997 Lions win, admittedly after losing a few big Tests in Europe.They had beaten the Springboks away in 2000 and downed all three southern hemisphere big guns at Twickenham in 2002. This England team is nothing like that. The bookies have England as 1/2 favourites for a match that will probably decide the destination of the Six Nations. The men in the trilbies, holding the satchels a week ahead of Cheltenham, usually know something. They have got the experience of winning and losing day in, day out – unlike this England team who have yet to pass a big examination. Now is the time to do it if the Jones bandwagon is to stay on the rails.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.last_img read more

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Convention to consider position on proposed Anglican Covenant

first_imgConvention to consider position on proposed Anglican Covenant The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls Tags Bruce Marshall says: Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET General Convention 2012 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Marc Kivel says: John-Albert Dickert says: Rector Bath, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET April 27, 2012 at 5:15 pm Reject the Covenant! We are not now nor have we ever been a Covenant Church. Our union is based upon the Book of Common Prayer and the Apostles’ and Nicene Creeds. Our growth will rest not upon rigidity but rather flexibility of thought and expression. Marc Kivel says: John-Albert Dickert says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Martinsville, VA Katherine Clark says: April 29, 2012 at 8:26 pm Prof. Bronk makes a solid analysis in re Bishop Douglas’s proposal to come up with a nonjuridical, noncannonical approach….I would note, though, that the use of Anglican vs. Episcopal arose because of foreign intervention into Episcopal provinces in North America… April 29, 2012 at 8:21 pm It seems to me that perhaps the more relevant set of statistics would be:Of the people leaving TEC, how many go to another Anglican community?How many go to non-Anglican communities?How many drop out of Christianity all together?How many stop going to church but do not officially drop their affiliation?Finally, how many of these folks are actually interviewed and their feedback on TEC and their decision making calculus captured? Thoughts? Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis May 7, 2012 at 8:09 pm We in the New Zealand/Pacific Islands context of the Communion are an independent Province of the Anglican Communion which helped the Church of England to understand and initiate the ethos of a three-House Synod – which permitted the faithful laity and well as the clergy to become part of the governance of our Church. We also, together with TEC, have helped the Church of England to understand the importance of Women’s Ministry in the Church – which the C.of E. is still struggling to implement at the level of the episcopate.Without our joint and independent action, our Mother Church may never have entered into the modern world understanding of these important matters of Ministry and mission. To tie ourselves to a juridical Magisterium-type relationship would be like taking a step backwards – like Rome and its movement away from the liberation of Vatican II. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ May 4, 2012 at 5:22 pm Thank you Lauren Gough+! I too hope that the upcoming General Convention will vote to end the debate over the Anglican Covenant. Several of the foregoing comments spell out additional reasons for doing so, but the most obvious one is that its rejection by the Church of England (together with the refusal of the GAFCON group) renders the covenant a dead letter. Canon Kearon’s opinion notwithstanding, there is nowhere left for it to go. It is time to get this albatross off our necks and get to work on the real challenges facing the Church. Just vote it down. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Anglican Communion, By Matthew DaviesPosted Apr 27, 2012 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Comments are closed. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit an Event Listing April 30, 2012 at 2:05 am Thank you, Matthew, for this story and background. As a Deputy to General Convention, I will have to decide among the various resolutions. You’ve done a great job in presenting them and explaining the background, and I am grateful. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET April 27, 2012 at 5:10 pm I am glad to see that there will be further discussion around the Anglican Covenant. Bishop Douglas’s proposal respects the work that has been done without endorsing the “juridical, canonical” approach to the means by which we express the nature of our Communion: a community of autocephalic churches.I do wish that ENS would stop using language such as ‘Episcopalians and Anglicans’. It is both ungrammatical and logically wrong. In philosophy we refer to it as a ‘category mistake’ similar to writing ‘oranges and fruit’. ‘Episcopalian’ is a subcategory of ‘Anglican’ not a comparative term. Please! April 27, 2012 at 6:16 pm To the House of Bishops: I am distressed that this proposed Covenant is becoming another cause for division among us. Our founding theologians (Richard Hooker, Jeremy Taylor, Launcelot Andrewes in particular) took pains to insure that Anglicanism would be spared the lock-step uniformity of Rome and of some of the emerging Protestant groups. Based on our own ecclesiastical history, many question the need for a Covenant beyond the binding force of Sacraments, Scripture, and the Book of Common Prayer. Within that framework, individual interpretation has always found a certain sanction, particularly within the Provinces.Even so, the idea of the Covenant came out of the controversy of Gene Robinson’s elevation to the episcopate. I know and understand the difficulty this has caused internationally. If the Anglican Communion had been encouraged to allow its diverse provinces to move ahead or lag behind on this issue depending on their culture and their understanding of the faith that binds us, much of the difficulty might have been resolved. However, this is not what happened.The issue over gays being allowed full participation in the Body of Christ seems to me a clear matter of faith and doctrine. Any argument or debate needs to address it first of all from this point of view. The Incarnation is our hallmark doctrine. If we as a whole church persist in denying baptized homosexuals full participation in Christ’s Body, many believe we are saying that the Church is claiming the right to determine who is included in Christ’s humanity and who is not. If the Church believes that the Purity Code in Leviticus binds gay practice to the sphere of abomination, then obviously we could not even baptize homosexuals since they would be living in an unrepented sin. Thank God we have not taken that route. At least so far. As long as a person is baptized, then by our own theological position, that person automatically has the capacity to receive every other Sacrament. (Barring some circumstance other than that person’s very identity!)If we as a church adopt this Covenant as it stands, especially Section 4, then we run the real risk of alienating this entire generation of young adults, many of whom are already stunned at the church’s hesitancy on this issue. If we truly want to preach the Good News, then we as a church need to think very seriously about the implications of our course of action regarding the life of homosexuals within the Body of Christ. This is not an issue that will disappear. Other Christian denominations have already moved formally toward inclusion, something that could well give us pause. “Pray for the Church!” Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Kieran Conroy says: Rector Collierville, TN Lisa Fox says: Kenichiro Kira says: April 28, 2012 at 4:50 pm Well Said. If we truly believe that we are to follow Jesus’ example and “love our neighbour as ourselves, and if we believe his answer when asked who is “our neighbour”, then can finally understand it is not up to us to determine who can come and who cannot come to receive the blessing offered by Jesus through the church.Jesus did not try to form an organized religion or a church, rather he tried to form a community of people who loved God and were in relationship with one another. Those people came from all aspects of society and were welcome to participate in the joy of worship and service to God and to the people of their day.Am I comfortable with diversity in our church? Not always, but that stems from my own inability to place myself in another’s shoes. Do I try to embrace those who are different? Yes, because as a disciple of Jesus that is my calling.My children cannot understand what the fuss is all about and the longer it goes on the more they are disappointed in the church. Are we the body of Christ or are we not? I shudder to think what Jesus would think of us if he walked into some or our churches today. We have a lot of work to do too build up the body of Christ, the church in the world, and I wonder why we are wasting time and money on this issue when there are people to feed, clothe, provide shelter for and to bring justice to.It’s hard to walk humbly with our God when we are busy making ourselves gate keepers of the church. I am tired of talking about and doing nothing about moving forward on this issue. In recent months I feel refreshed and spiritually fed when I go to a church which welcomes all believers whatever their background. The United Church in Canada dealt with this issue long ago and are moving forward in ministry. I love going to church there at times just to feel surrounded by a truly inclusive christian community and see the work of ministry being done in terms of justice and outreach. Can we please get on with the work of ministry??? Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Comments (15) Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem May 8, 2012 at 3:59 am Dear Kieran,I get weary when people talk about maintaining a continuity with ecumenical connections and ancient Christian traditions which by the way subjugate both men and women and are ruled by absolute monarchs. Especially when it is those very institutions you are referring to which look upon us as incompatible as equals. As far as preserving the riches of 2,000 years of Christianity , I will go with those who tried to maintain the poverty of Christ. What was the parable about putting new wine in an old wine container about? And I never knew Jesus to do anything in the middle way, so to speak. As a matter of fact he was quite radical. No my friend I am not castigating you or your opinions. You have as much right to them as I do to mine. But I am not going to insist you join in a covenant that gives me the right to punish you because we have divergent opinions. That is why I can love you as an equal. Because of those divergent opinions. But then again that must be the Protestant in me. Wink. Don’t you love being an Episcopalian!!!! Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest April 30, 2012 at 6:56 pm Bishop Douglas is a wise man I was blessed to study under just before his election at Episcopal Divinity School. While recent Church of England moves, GAFCON rejections, and Archbishop William’s resignation seem to pose real challenges, joining other Provinces around the world who are trying to take the Covenant seriously and remain committed to this dialog seems vital. I like his idea of strongly affirming what we can, and being honest about where there are still challenges.As a cradle Roman Catholic I have seen the other side of TOO much ecclesiastical authority-recent crackdown’s on our countries devoted Religious women being one example. But I also fear any moves within my new Anglican home that good intentions throw vital eccumenical connections and ancient Christian traditions “out with the bathwater.” That does not mean hesitating to stand with those in need with “Radical Welcome” (as my Angli-merging friends at the Crossing, Boston would say), but it does mean considering the deep impact of our actions on centuries of history with Christians around the world. Deeply drawn to our tradition for its respect for the full dignity of women, minorities and LGBT folks, I still sometimes wrestle with the fact “progressive” actions taken uncritically can be more about feeling good than making a more lasting impact in the world. The ability of Anglicans to preserve our Catholicity alongside our Protestant heritage, to give people space to wrestle with hard issues, but preserve the riches of 2,000 years of Christianity, and above all show the diverse but beautiful face of Christ to the world is a very high stake indeed.What balance is needed between binding authority and freedom of local conscience/pastoral need to keep us along the Middle Way, not just solving our problems but in seeking peacemaking, world changing relations not just within our own borders around the world? For example, the important influence our membership in the Anglican Communion has on voiceless LGBT folks in more hostile places, and the vital influence the voice of Christians of many races and cultures has on us? What happens to our solidarity with LGBT folks around the world, for example if their Provinces refuse to be in any relationship with us? I struggle with these things.An eye cannot say “I do not need you” to a hand (1 Cor 12:21), as Paul says well. I don’t see easy answers, but will be keeping our brothers and sisters in the General Convention- including those from my own communities- in prayer this summer.Grace and Peace,Kieran Conroy, MDiv (Harvard Divinity School)Omaha Ressurection House AlumniSt. Andrews Omaha and Alegent Health Chaplain Resident John Greco says: May 4, 2012 at 3:14 pm I would like to see the Gen. Con. vote down the Covenant all togehter . The purpose of the Covenant was to ‘discipline’ those churches of the Communion that went against Lambeth deliberations. Lambeth has never had legislative power and shouldn’t have. What the Covenant would do is change the unique character of our Communion into a single Church rather than the Communion of churches that have their discreet histories and discreet missions.What Anglicanism provides for the Universal Church is an approach to Christianity that does not require coercion to be in communion with one another. The Via Media can still be strong and important to churches and nations that are terribly polarized. And if Via Media is going to be viable it must start within the Communion. It requires us to be able to find Christ in one another while the Covenant does not. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Marc Kivel says: The Rev. Lauren Gough says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Hopkinsville, KY April 29, 2012 at 8:30 pm I concur, Gloria…we need to get on with mission and ministry…. Rev. Prof. H. R. Bronk says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Albany, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Anglican Covenant, Submit a Job Listing Rector Washington, DC Featured Events In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Knoxville, TN General Convention, Rector Tampa, FL April 30, 2012 at 11:46 am Thank you for your sharp and fair comment, Prof. Bronk.The term of Episcopal, ironically, has been stood out ever since Presiding Bishop Jefferts Schori pushed “her own humanism” too much. Regardless of different theological interpretation among the Anglican Communion, it is hard to erase the image Jefferts Schori created, which is “mere humanism” rather than “theology tacked with ecclesiology. I feel bad for the the U.S. Anglicans (Episcopalians). Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL May 8, 2012 at 3:08 am Time to put this at peace. I think it is time to let the Anglican Communion be what it wants to be and let us be who we are. We disagree fundamentally on what full-inclusion means. So be it. The tactic of waiting till those who disagree with you drop dead is not only degrading but unkind for those who wish to move on in the light of full equality. And to be honest even when we do say good-bye and go our own way we will still have issues which need to be resolved. Such as moving to one Sacrament of Marriage, and quit deluding ourselves into thinking that a Sacred Union and Marriage are equal. They are not and should be. There is much to be done in the Kingdom of God. Father Ron Smith says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET [Episcopal News Service] The Anglican Covenant has been variously rejected, affirmed, approved and subscribed to by some Anglican Communion provinces, and even been given an “amber light” by one. The Episcopal Church will soon consider its own formal response to the document which supporters say offers a way to bind Anglicans globally across cultural and theological differences.At present, three resolutions, each calling for partially different responses to the proposed covenant, will be proposed to the 77th General Convention when it meets July 5-12 in Indianapolis, Indiana.The Episcopal Church’s Executive Council announced last October that it would submit a resolution (A126, found on page 590 of the Blue Book) to convention that would have the church say it is “unable to adopt the Anglican Covenant in its present form.”In recent weeks, two additional resolutions — from different groups of bishops — have been submitted to convention. Those two resolutions will be posted here soon.One resolution proposed by Bishop John Bauerschmidt of Tennessee and endorsed by 10 other bishops would commit the church to affirming and adopting the covenant. Another, proposed by Bishop Ian Douglas of Connecticut and backed by two other bishops, would encourage a more via media approach, “embracing” the preamble and first three sections of the four-section document, urging continued study, and committing the church to ongoing participation in the covenant process.The document’s fourth section, which outlines a disciplinary method for resolving disputes in the communion, has largely been the covenant’s sticking point.The Executive Council and the Douglas-sponsored resolutions are identical in the first three resolves, saying that the church will “recommit itself to dialogue with the several provinces when adopting innovations which may be seen as threatening the unity of the communion”; and commit to “continued participation in the wider councils of the Anglican Communion” and dialogue “with our brothers and sisters in other provinces to deepen understanding and to insure the continued integrity of the Anglican Communion.”The Bauerschmidt-sponsored resolution calls on the Episcopal Church to “affirm … and commit itself to adoption” of the covenant “in order to live more fully into the ecclesial communion and interdependence which is foundational to the churches of the Anglican Communion.”The Anglican Covenant first was proposed in the 2004 Windsor Report as a way that the communion and its 38 autonomous provinces might maintain unity despite differences, especially relating to biblical interpretation and human sexuality issues. The report came in the wake of the 2003 election of Gene Robinson, an openly gay priest, as bishop of New Hampshire, a development that caused some provinces to declare broken or impaired communion with the Episcopal Church.The covenant also was a response to some church leaders crossing borders into other provinces to minister to disaffected Anglicans and a decision by the Diocese of New Westminster in the Anglican Church of Canada to authorize a public rite to bless same-gender unions.Following five years of discussion and several draft versions, the final text of the covenant was sent in December 2009 to the communion’s provinces for formal consideration.Douglas told ENS in an April 24 telephone interview that the Episcopal Church has participated “at an extremely high level” in considering each draft of the covenant. He also said that Executive Council and its D020 Task Force on the Response to the Anglican Covenant “have done an incredibly good job in helping the Episcopal Church construct a response that is broadly inclusive of the diverse perspectives” in the church.His only reservation about Resolution A126, he said, is in the final resolve that urges the Episcopal Church not to adopt the covenant in its present form. “My concerns about a straight non-adoption are that it doesn’t allow for letting the Episcopal Church embrace what is in the first three sections,” he said, noting that a straight “no” vote would remove the Episcopal Church from the covenant process entirely.“I’ve never been a strong advocate of this particular covenant process. But participating in the discussion is still very important. And I don’t want to preclude the opportunity for us to be at the table,” he said.Bauerschmidt wrote in an April 25 e-mail to ENS that he thought it would be a good thing if the Episcopal Church had the opportunity at this convention clearly to affirm and commit to adoption of the covenant.“A communion that is committed to dispersed authority needs some means for seeking a common mind and expressing a common life,” he said. “The covenant provides the means for this. We ought to decide together the things that concern us all, or we will soon face being of little concern at all to each other.”General Convention may decide in July whether to pass, amend and pass, or reject any resolutions it considers.First, the 40-member legislative committee on World Mission will consider the Anglican Covenant resolutions and may decide to rework or consolidate them before any draft legislation is sent to whichever of the two houses (deputies and bishops) of General Convention has been chosen as the so-called house of initial action. The committee, which will begin meeting on July 4, is co-chaired by Douglas and Canon Rosalie Simmonds Ballentine, who also chaired the D020 Task Force that released its report along with its proposed Resolution A126 in October 2011.The Standing Commission on Constitution and Canons determined in a June 2011 report requested by the D020 Task Force that adoption of the current draft Anglican Covenant “has the potential to change the constitutional and canonical framework of TEC, particularly with respect to the autonomy of our church, and the constitutional authority of the General Convention, bishops and dioceses.”All three proposed resolutions call for the creation of a new task force that would explore the canonical changes needed if the church were to adopt the covenant in its entirety.The 76th General Convention in July 2009 asked the dioceses, via Resolution 2009-D020, to study the Anglican Covenant during the 2010-2012 triennium. It also asked Executive Council to prepare a report, along with proposed draft legislation, to the 77th General Convention this year. That resolution led council to create the D020 Task Force.Some Episcopalians and Anglicans, including the Executive Council, have raised concerns about the covenant being used as an instrument of control, questioning in particular the fourth section and its dispute-resolution process. Some critics have warned that adopting the covenant could result in a two-tier communion.“I don’t find section 4 helpful,” Douglas told ENS. “I think it moves the covenant from a document that is relational to one that is more juridical. I do think the first three sections are relational and missional.”The D020 Task Force said in its report (available for download here) that the rationale for advocating its “unable to adopt” resolution was based on its belief that the church’s unity is “best expressed in our efforts to be a church that fully welcomes those who have not always been welcomed.”The Episcopal Church seeks to be faithful to that unity, the report continues, “by honoring the diversity of ministries in the Episcopal Church in multiple forms: our tradition of empowerment of all orders of ministry in governance; our identification of the interpretation of Scripture as the work of all Christian communities; and our heeding of the work of the Spirit in new understandings of how we are called to be in community and relationships.”“This understanding of who we are as a church does not allow the Executive Council to support any covenant that might jeopardize this vocation,” the task force members said in the report. “The covenant consistently ignores the importance of the role of the laity and their full expression of ministry in all spheres of the life of the church.”The task force members included those who were on the “extremes” of opinion in the church about the covenant, as well as people in the middle of that spectrum, Ballentine told the council Oct. 24.She said that the task force purposely used the language of “unable to adopt in its present form” rather than suggesting that convention “reject” the covenant or “refrain” from adopting it.“We still have hope for our continuing relationship, our continuing conversations, our continuing efforts to live in community and for us to move forward as part of the Anglican Communion,” she said.Throughout the Anglican Communion, the seven provinces that have approved or subscribed to the Anglican Covenant are Ireland, Mexico, Myanmar, Papua New Guinea, South East Asia, Southern Cone of America, and the West Indies.The Anglican Church of Southern Africa has adopted the document pending ratification at its next synod meeting later this year.In March, it became clear that the Church of England could not adopt the covenant in its current form when a majority of its dioceses voted the document down.The Church in Wales on April 18 gave the covenant “an amber light, rather than a green light.” The church’s governing body said it feared the recent rejection of the covenant by the Church of England jeopardized its future and clarifications about that were now needed before a decision could be made. It sent questions on the matter to the Anglican Consultative Council, the church’s main policy-making body, which meets later this year.Episcopal Church in the Philippines bishops have formally rejected the covenant although the Anglican Communion Office confirmed that it had not yet received a formal notification from that province. Maori action in the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia rejecting the covenant last November means that it may be rejected when it comes before the province’s General Synod in July.During a recent visit to England, Bishop Mary Gray-Reeves of the San Jose, California-based Diocese of El Camino Real, told ENS that international partnerships, such as the one that her diocese shares with Gloucester and Western Tanganyika in Tanzania, are the “antidote to the Anglican Covenant.”Douglas agrees. “Communion is fundamentally about relationships — relationships across our differences in service to the mission of God — and not some kind of juridical or contractual or ecclesiological statement,” he told ENS.Many conservative Anglicans also have rejected the covenant, saying that it does not go far enough to bring into line provinces that have taken steps towards the full inclusion of gays and lesbians in the life of the church.“While we acknowledge that the efforts to heal our brokenness through the introduction of an Anglican Covenant were well intentioned we have come to the conclusion the current text is fatally flawed and so support for this initiative is no longer appropriate,” a group of conservative Anglican primates, or archbishops, have said.— Matthew Davies is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service.In Spanish: http://bit.ly/IoJMJl Gloria Penwell says: last_img read more

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El Consejo Ejecutivo denuncia la violencia y el tráfico de…

first_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group [Episcopal News Service – Linthicum Heights, Maryland] El Consejo Ejecutivo de la Iglesia Episcopal  (Executive Council) se pronunció el 27 de febrero contra la violencia armada y el tráfico de las armas de fuego, e instó a los episcopales a “arrepentirse del papel que hemos desempeñado en la glorificación y trivialización de la violencia”.La resolución “en verdad ascendió desde la base”, dijo Byron Rushing, vicepresidente de la Cámara de Diputados, durante una conferencia de prensa a mediados del último día de la reunión del Consejo del 25 al 27 de febrero en el Centro de Conferencias del Instituto Marítimo de esta ciudad.La resolución expresa “profundo pesar por la epidemia de la violencia armada” e insta a los episcopales a laborar en pro de “respuestas sociales globales que busquen desarraigar los ciclos de violencia que alimentan los delitos con armas de fuego”. [Esta resolución] viene a reafirmar varias resoluciones anteriores de la Convención General, incluida la Resolución 2000-D004 (Resolution 2000-D004) que expresa “la profunda preocupación de la Iglesia acerca del repetido uso de pistolas y armas de asalto,  de fácil obtención, por niños y contra niños”, y le pedía a los episcopales que buscaran formas de elaborar estrategias comunitarias y de crear santuarios para los niños “de manera que todos puedan llegar a identificar y apreciar, a ellos mismos y a los demás, como los valiosos hijos de Dios que son, y que puedan llegar a conocer la paz en sus vidas y a crear la paz para las generaciones futuras”.El consejo también reafirmó la Resolución 1991-D088  (Resolution 1991-D088) de la Convención General que convoca a la Iglesia a promover “una política pública de adecuada financiación para brindar servicios comunitarios completos, atención hospitalaria e investigación sobre las causas y el tratamiento de las enfermedades mentales”. La resolución del Consejo dice que los servicios para la atención de la salud mental deberían estar disponibles y ser accesibles “sin estigma, en una variedad de escenarios”, y deberían estar a la disposición de “lo que han sufrido traumas por verse expuestos a la violencia o a ambientes violentos”.La Resolución 1997-C035 de la Convención General (Resolution 1997-C035) es también notable por su llamado a imponer restricciones en la venta, la propiedad y el uso de armas de fuego, particularmente las que pueden ocultarse con facilidad, y la aplicación de mayores restricciones sobre las armas [que se llevan] ocultas. El Consejo también ratificó la Resolución 2000-B007  (Resolution 2000-B007), que reconoce que la violencia es alentada y activada por la presencia de las armas de fuego y le pide a los episcopales que aboguen por la remoción de pistolas y fusiles de asalto de los hogares, comunidades y vehículos.La resolución del Consejo insta a los funcionarios electos a convertir el tráfico de armas en un delito federal y a encomendar a los agentes de la ley a que investiguen y procesen a los compradores ilegales, a los traficantes de armas y a todas las redes criminales”.Finalmente, la resolución insta a los episcopales a “examinar nuestras propias actitudes culturales hacia la violencia mediante campañas en congregaciones y comunidades [y] a arrepentirse del papel que hemos desempeñado en la glorificación y trivialización de la violencia y a comprometernos con otra actitud”.El Rdo. Stan Runnels, miembro del Consejo proveniente de [la diócesis de] Misuri Occidental, quien votó a favor de la resolución, dijo antes de la votación que la declaración era “de algunas formas prudentemente benévola” y él le pidió al comité de Promoción y Redes de Conexión del Consejo que hubiese futuras resoluciones que fuesen “más específicas, más directas, más precisas” en abordar los problemas  “que son más pertinentes a la violencia de las armas de fuego”, tales como la proliferación de las armas de asalto, los barriletes [o “peines”] de alta capacidad y la concentración de grandes cantidades de municiones.“Ahora mismo en este país los patos están más seguros que los seres humanos”, dijo, porque al cazador de patos sólo le permiten cinco cartuchos en su escopeta.En otras decisiones del 27 de febrero, el Consejo también:* Convino en un enfoque para formular una propuesta presupuestaria para el trienio 2016-2018. El enfoque se basa en la consideración de que el presupuesto es una “declaración económica de la misión”, dijo la Rda. Susan Snook, miembro del comité de Finanzas para la Misión. Los comités, comisiones, agencias y juntas de la Iglesia (committees, commissions, agencies and boards) (CCABs, sigla en inglés) serían consultados para darle  cuerpo a la visión y prioridades del presupuesto.El plan también propone que se tome una decisión a tiempo sobre la fórmula usada para determinar cuánto dinero se les pediría a las diócesis como contribución a la financiación del presupuesto, y que se colabore con la Cámara de Obispos en un esfuerzo para aumentar el compromiso diocesano con esa solicitud.Un borrador del presupuesto del Consejo se le dará a conocer a la Iglesia en octubre de 2014, de manera que los miembros de la Iglesia puedan hacer sus comentarios, y sus reacciones puedan ser tomadas en consideración antes de que la propuesta presupuestaria esté terminada en febrero de 2015.La estrategia presupuestaria sugiere que el Comité de Finanzas para la Misión (FFM, sigla en inglés) y el Comité Permanente Conjunto sobre Programa, Presupuesto y Finanzas (PB&F, sigla en inglés), los cuales reciben la propuesta presupuestaria del Consejo Ejecutivo, deben reunirse juntos al menos una vez durante este proceso. El PB&F considera la propuesta presupuestaria del Consejo mientras prepara el presupuesto trienal para presentárselo a la Convención.El Comité de FFM convino en octubre de 2012 en que el proceso presupuestario debe cambiarse, aunque un equipo de trabajo especial sobre la estructura de la Iglesia sin duda discutiría los problemas del presupuesto. Ese equipo de trabajo se reunió por primera vez a principios de este mes y debe informarle a toda la Iglesia en noviembre de 2014 y presentar sus recomendaciones en la reunión de la Convención General en Salt Lake City en 2015.Sin embargo, el proceso del Consejo Ejecutivo de elaborar una propuesta para el presupuesto 2016-2018 debe marchar pareja con el quehacer de ese grupo porque la Regla Conjunta II.10.c.ii de la Convención General dice que el Consejo debe presentar su propuesta presupuestaria al PB&F no menos de cuatro meses antes del comienzo de la Convención General.Los miembros del Consejo dieron un primer paso en su nuevo proceso el 27 de mayo cuando acordaron basar el [trienio] 2016-2018 en el contexto de las Cinco Marcas de la Misión de la Comunión Anglicana (Anglican Communion Five Marks of Mission). El presupuesto también estará disponible en un formato que identifica los gastos corporativos, canónicos y de programa.* Oyó comentarios de la mayoría de sus comités acerca de la necesidad de continuar el empeño de ayudar a la Iglesia Episcopal a convertirse en una Iglesia antirracista. La Rda. Gay Clark Jennings, presidente de la Cámara de Diputados y vicepresidente del Consejo, destacó en la conferencia de prensa que los miembros del Consejo suelen participar en ejercicios antirracistas. Rushing dijo que “la gente no pretende resolver cuáles serán las próximas y mejores medidas a tomar al hacer esa labor, pero ciertamente esto sigue siendo una prioridad de la Iglesia Episcopal”.* Disolvió su Comité de Estrategia de Archivos, el Comité Asesor sobre Jubileo y el Comité sobre Planificación Estratégica, y disolvió también el Comité sobre VIH/SIDA (HIV/AIDS), y transfirió cualquier tarea pendiente a la Comisión Permanente de Salud (Standing Commission on Health). Renovó también sus comités sobre Responsabilidad Social Corporativa; Ministerios Indígenas; Condición de la Mujer; Ciencia, Tecnología y Fe; y el Comité de Préstamos de Justicia Económica ( Corporate Social Responsibility; Indigenous Ministries; the Status of Women; Science, Technology and Faith; and the Economic Justice Loan Committee). Según sus Estatutos (Artículo VIII.2.d), la duración de los comités del Consejo caduca en la segunda Convención General después de su creación, a menos que el Consejo especifique otra cosa.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service.Traducido por Vicente Echerri Tags Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ El Consejo Ejecutivo denuncia la violencia y el tráfico de las armas de fuego Instan a los episcopales a examinar las ‘actitudes culturales hacia la violencia’ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Bath, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release Rector Collierville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Gun Violence, Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Press Release Service Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Youth Minister Lorton, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Albany, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit an Event Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Human Trafficking Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Executive Council, Director of Music Morristown, NJ Executive Council February 2013, The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Martinsville, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 1, 2013 last_img read more

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Bishops explore ministry challenges in Asia

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Tags This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT House of Bishops, Rector Albany, NY [Episcopal News Service – Taipei, Taiwan] Members of the House of Bishops have begun learning about the theological context and mission challenges faced by Episcopal and Anglican churches in Asia.Their exploration had already begun with a deep experience of what Diocese of Kansas Bishop Dean Wolfe described as “such hospitality, such graciousness, such joy in the spirit” on the part of Taiwanese Episcopalians who are hosting the Sept. 17-23 meeting here.“I will take that back to my Diocese of Kansas and remind my people of the connection we have with the Diocese of Taiwan,” said Wolfe, who is vice president of the house and served as emcee for the Sept. 19 sessions.Wolfe noted that some members of the Episcopal Church have questioned why the bishops would go to the expense of meeting in Taiwan. “We never think about not going to our farthest parish because it is too far away” or too small, he said.Taiwan Bishop David Jung-Hsin Lai explains to the House of Bishops Sept. 19 how his diocese operates in a country where Christianity is in the minority and many traditional spiritual practices still must be honored. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/ Episcopal News ServiceThus, because the bishops accepted Taiwan Bishop David Jung-Hsin Lai’s invitation to meet here, Wolfe said to applause, they have found that “the Diocese of Taiwan is a much a part of this family as any diocese in the Episcopal Church.”After fanning out on Sept. 18 to visit three congregations of the Diocese of Taiwan, along with the diocese’s St. John’s University, the bishops came back together on the 19th to learn more about the Taiwanese Episcopal Church as well as Anglican work in Hong Kong and Pakistan.Taiwanese Episcopalians “started from zero” and now have 20 churches, including seven parishes, Lai said. He acknowledged that his diocese’s ministry is run differently from most other dioceses in the Episcopal Church because of the cultural context of Taiwan. Taiwanese often practice a combination of Buddhism, Taoism and Confucianism. Most of the island’s traditional places of worship combine all three traditions.Episcopal churches in Taiwan must work within that context, he said. For instance, they use a Mandarin Book of Common Prayer (which took 15 years to translate) and also have a book of supplemental liturgies that frame traditional practices, such as ancestor worship, in a Christian context.And the diocese actively encourages Christian formation and faith sharing with others. The diocese also helps members discern their ministry, and then actively supports that ministry, often monetarily, the bishop said.Families often ostracize members who convert to Christianity, Lai said, seeing the conversion as a betrayal. Yet, the bishop urges his members to make their Christian faith evident in their daily lives to counter a common notion in Taiwan that all religions are the same and only “teach us to be a good person.”“I always remind our church members: ‘don’t keep silence when they say so. If you keep silent it means you agree with their idea. But don’t try to argue with them. You need to build a good relationship.’ So I always encourage them to share your belief – your faith – with them so that they know the God we worship is so different from the god as the idol you worship in your family, in the temple or anywhere.”Lai said that diocesan members are encouraged not to just believe in and trust in God but also to “do something by your faith” in a way that others, including family members, will see the converted person as others will see “how different, how wonderful, how joyful that you are; you are a Christian, you are a person with a totally new life.”A summary of the history of the Diocese of Taiwan, which is celebrating its 60th anniversary this year, can be found in this story.The Rev. Peter Koon, provincial secretary of the Hong Kong heng Kung Hui (Anglican Church in Hong Kong), asked for the bishops’ prayers as that province faces the possibility of unrest, perhaps as early as October, by way of the anticipated Occupy Central with Love and Peace, which will campaign for universal suffrage.Hong Kong return to Chinese sovereignty in 1997 from British control and the laws governing that move say the territory is getting to a system of universal suffrage for picking the chief executive in the 2017 election. Some in Hong Kong worry that the national legislature and the city government will insist on a plan for nominating the chief executive that bars candidates unacceptable to Beijing.The challenge, Koon said, is how the Anglican churches in Hong Kong can find ways to respond pastorally and theologically to congregations that are divided on the issue.“Do pray for the cathedral because we are in the hot spot,” Koon said.Gareth Jones, principal of the Hong Kong Sheng Kung Hui Ming Hua Theological College, tells the House of Bishops Sept. 19 how the seminary prepares its students to be grounded in Anglican identity and theology. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceMeanwhile, Gareth Jones, principal of the province’s Ming Hua Theological College, outlined the seminary’s effort to change theological education.Many seminaries in the Anglican Communion, he said, have “a tendency toward generic theological education with a little bit of Anglicanism bolted onto the end.” Rather than foster what he called the “theological confusion” such a model either evidences or causes, Ming Hua has moved to a model that is more rooted in Anglican identity from the outset and which emphasizes the idea of companionship with God, Jones said.The model also is based on an understanding that the crises of faith can be seen through the crises in the gardens of Eden and Gethsemane and the seminarians are learning “how to be in Adam and Eve’s shoes and how to be in Jesus’ shoes in those gardens.”Recent ENS coverage of the ministry of the Anglican Church in Hong Kong is here and here.The Church of Pakistan (United) wants a strong relationship with the Episcopal Church, its moderator, Bishop Samuel Azariah, tells the House of Bishops on Sept. 19. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceBishop Samuel Azariah, moderator of the Church of Pakistan (United), told the bishops about the life of his church in a country where Christians account for 1.5 percent of the 189 million Pakistanis.He said Pakistan is “in continuous religious disputes” within itself, and with India and Afghanistan.“The misuse and abuse of religion has not only impacted our economy and our relationships, but has also introduced a phase of religious militancy” and especially one that vows to spread Islam, he said. “That is the reality of the context we live in and very soon this is going to hit you, my brothers and my sisters, even in the United States.”Azariah added a caution: “I’m not saying that we need to fight Islam; what I am saying is that we need to recognize that reality” and prepare for it by learning about Islam and working to improve interfaith relations, and always searching for reconciliation.“Islam will be the dominant religion in your own dioceses sooner or later that you will have to negotiate with,” he told the bishops. “You will have large populations of Muslims around you in your areas to whom you will have to pastor to and how will you do that?”In his context, Azariah said he rejects the ideas of loving one’s enemies, saying instead he prefers to advocate loving one’s neighbors in a way that aims “to recognize, to respect in humbleness and with patience, the quality of otherness that my neighbor carries within himself or within herself.”Meanwhile, Azariah issued a call for deeper relations between his church and others in the Anglican Communion, especially in terms of educational partnerships and development.“We want to be in relationship; not a relationship of dependency. We do not want to be a project of any church but in a relationship of equal brothers and sisters and disciples of Jesus Christ,” he said.Also on the bishops’ agendaThe theme of the House of Bishops meeting in Taiwan is “expanding the apostolic imagination” and the house is also due to hear from bishops and others from the Anglican Church in Japan, the Philippines and Korea as part of that exploration. However, the approach of Tropical Storm Fung-Wong may disrupt the travel of some of those people, the bishops were warned.The bishops, spouses, partners and others attending the meeting will spend Sept. 20 sightseeing in various parts of the island. On Sunday, Sept. 21, they will worship at either Church of the Good Shepherd and St. John’s Cathedral in Taipei or Advent Church in Tam Sui. They will return to Taipei in the late afternoon for a session aimed at processing their experiences.The evening of the 21st will also include a closed fireside chat meant for the presiding bishop and the bishops alone.While in Taipei, the bishops also are scheduled to receive briefings on the work of the Task Force for Reimagining the Episcopal Church, which recently released a letter to the church outlining the recommendations on structural change it will make to the 2015 meeting of General Convention. Bishop members of the A050 Task Force on the Study of Marriage and the Joint Nominating Committee for the Election of the Presiding Bishop will also discuss the work of those groups to date. The latter briefing will be held in closed session, according to the meeting schedule.The bishops also plan a town hall-style session with the presiding bishop and a formal business session on Sept. 23.After the meeting ends a number of bishops are heading to Japan, Hong Kong, the Philippines or Korea to continue learning about mission and ministry of the Anglican Church.The meeting is taking place at the Grand Hotel in Taipei. Some bishops are blogging from the meeting about their visit to Taiwan, includingNewark Bishop Mark BeckwithLos Angeles Bishop Suffragan Diane Jardine BruceNevada Bishop Dan EdwardsWestern Massachusetts Bishop Douglas FisherNorth Dakota Assisting Bishop Carol GallagherBishop Doug HahnRhode Island Bishop Nicholas KnisleyBishop Suffragan for Armed Services & Federal Ministries Jay MagnessBishop Greg RickelDelaware Bishop Wayne WrightOthers are tweeting during the meeting using #HOBFall14. Those tweets can be read here.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Submit a Press Release Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Events Submit a Job Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Smithfield, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Asia, Youth Minister Lorton, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Bath, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Sep 19, 2014 House of Bishops Fall 2014 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishops explore ministry challenges in Asia Minority church representatives sketch out their contextslast_img read more

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Episcopal Church’s sense of prayer aids ‘Thy Kingdom Come’ campaign

first_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted May 18, 2017 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Bath, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Ecumenical & Interreligious May 19, 2017 at 10:47 am I love this! [Episcopal News Service] Before the church was the church, the first followers of Jesus faced an uncertain time. He had ascended into heaven, after pledging to send the Holy Spirit “not many days from now.” However, the promised empowerment to be his witnesses had not materialized. So, Act 1:14 says, they prayed, constantly.It is said they prayed for 11 days until Pentecost’s tongues of fire descended on them and the Holy Spirit gave them the power to spread the gospel, telling the story of how the kingdom of God had come near them in the person of Jesus. Their witness began drawing in others who committed to following Jesus and together they formed a nascent church.Today in the church, these 11 days do not get much attention, coming as they do after Easter as spring eases into summer. However, for the second year, Thy Kingdom Come, a campaign initiated by Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, seeks to refocus Christians worldwide around the world on the early disciples’ example. He wants people to know “what it means to follow Christ and what an amazing journey that takes you on,” explained Emma Buchan, project leader of Lambeth Palace’s evangelism task group project.Thy Kingdom Come invites individuals, families and congregations to pray between Ascension Day (May 25) and Pentecost (June 4) that their friends, families and neighbors come to know Jesus Christ. The campaign suggests that participants keep five specific people in their prayers during the 11 days. Moreover, they are invited to make their prayers known by sharing a short prayer on each of the 11 days through social media (details below). The motto is “Pray it – Picture it – Post it.”Each day’s theme comes from the catechism in the Episcopal Church’s version of the Book of Common Prayer. The catechism’s prayer and worship section (page 856 here) lists the principal kinds of prayer as adoration, praise, thanksgiving, penitence, oblation, intercession and petition. The organizers added a prayer to Jesus as well as prayers of celebration, silence and for thy kingdom come. They modified some of the language, with penitence becoming “sorry,” oblation becoming “offer,” intercession becoming “pray for” and petition becoming “help.”“We were asked to suggest a strategy for involving clergy around the world and also to figure out a way of making sure that the prayer component in which people are asked to participate is of substance and depth,” Jamie Coats, director of the Friends of the Society of Saint John the Evangelist told Episcopal News Service.The SSJE brothers have worked with the Anglican Communion Office to offer Advent Word and that office asked them to discuss with Lambeth Palace “ideas that could help people pray around the world together.”High on their list of suggestions was that Thy Kingdom Come’s prayers follow the catechism pattern that the brothers developed at the request of then-Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori for the Prayers of the People at the 2015 meeting of General Convention.Calling the Episcopal catechism beautiful and poetic as well as very well-articulated, Coats said the choice is a “recognition of the extraordinarily beautiful work that went into the catechism.”“It’s been wonderful to work with Lambeth Palace and see them reaching out and working with people around the world,” Coats said. He added that much of that work has been around adapting church language to broader, diverse audiences spread over many time zones.“We’re really delighted to be working with the Episcopal Church and we’re really delighted to be joining together with churches around the world in this time of praying,” Buchan told ENS.“They just seemed to us to be a good thing to have a theme for each day,” Buchan said of the catechism-based daily focus. “Just to give people an opportunity to come in many ways to prayer, and to consider what God might be calling them to do, to pray for those they love,” as well are for all of the other things in their lives.All of the work is anchored in the hope that people will come closer Jesus, she said.That hope fits perfectly with SSJE’s mission. “As members of a monastic community, we brothers are committed to helping people learn to pray their lives,” said James Koester, SSJE’s superior. “We believe that this is what Jesus did when he taught the disciples the prayer we now know as the Lord’s Prayer. During the 11 days of Thy Kingdom Come, it is our hope that everyone who participates will deepen their friendship with Jesus and come to know that every aspect of their life is the stuff of prayer.”In his lead-off video for Thy Kingdom Come’s daily meditations, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry says prayer changes everything. Photo: Episcopal News ServicePresiding Bishop Michael Curry’s meditation on #ToJesus leads off the 11 days on May 25.More than 100,000 people committed to prayer during Thy Kingdom Come’s first round in 2016, according to Buchan, who was hired to plan the 2016 effort. That year the goal was 5,000 participants. Buchan called that outcome “an amazing work of the Holy Spirit.”Coats said the 11 days are meant to “give people a taste of the different ways to pray” and think about how they might use the Thy Kingdom come materials, which are essentially timeless, at other times of the year as well.The how-to detailsPledge2PrayGo to http://thykingdomcome.global now and sign up to receive a daily email.Watch the video included in the email (list below).Respond to the email.Share on social media. On Twitter (twitter.com/thykingdom_come) and Instagram (www.instagram.com/Pledge2Pray), tag your image/prayer with #Pledge2Pray and the tag for the day. Make sure there is a space between the tags, for example: #Pledge2Pray #ToJesus.  On Facebook, go to the Thy Kingdom Come page. (www.facebook.com/ThyKingdomComeUK) and post to the Timeline using #Pledge2Pray and the tag of the day, for example #Pledge2Pray #ThyKingdomCome.Help create a Global Prayer Wall.Access resources and informationA wide range of resources and information to aid participation in Thy Kingdom Come are available here. For instance, a prayer journal for young people and adults to record thoughts, prayers and ideas throughout the 11 days can be downloaded here. A facilitator’s guide for people who want to follow Thy Kingdom Come in a group is available here.Pray in personAcross England, prayer events of all shapes and sizes will take place, including 24/7 prayer rooms, prayer days, prayer walks and half nights of prayer. Church of England cathedrals, churches and other venues will host “Beacon Events,” gathering people to worship and pray for to be empowered of the Holy Spirit for effective witness.While the majority of such events will happen in England, there is a short but growing list of U.S.-based events.The Church of England is supplying low-cost copies (about $1 each) of “The Life: An Account of the Life of Jesus Christ According to Luke” () to be given away at Thy Kingdom Come-related events.Video messagesEach day’s prayer leader offers a video featuring him or her praying a prayer of his or her own design based on that day’s theme. The schedule is:May 25 #ToJesus: The Most Rev. Michael Curry, presiding bishop and primate, the Episcopal ChurchMay 26 #Praise: His Eminence Christoph Cardinal Schonborn, archbishop of ViennaMay 27 #Thanks: The Most Rev. Paul Kwong, archbishop of Hong KongMay 28 #Sorry: The Ven. Liz Adekunle, archdeacon of Hackney, LondonMay 29 #Offer: The Rt. Rev. Griselda Delgado del Carpio, bishop of CubaMay 30 #PrayFor: The Most. Rev. Fred Hiltz, archbishop and primate, the Anglican Church of CanadaMay 31 #Help: The Most Rev. John Sentamu, archbishop of York and primate of EnglandJune 1 #Adore: The Rev. Roger Walton, president, British Methodist ConferenceJune 2 #Celebrate: His Grace Bishop Angaelos, general bishop, the Coptic Orthodox Church in the United KingdomJune 3 #Silence: Br. Keith Nelson, the Society of St. John the EvangelistJune 4 #ThyKingdomCome: The Most Rev. and Rt. Hon. Justin Welby, archbishop of Canterbury and primate of All England– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is senior editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Comments (3) Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Press Release Service TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Lucretia Jevne says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Church’s sense of prayer aids ‘Thy Kingdom Come’ campaign #Pledge2Pray now for 11 days between Ascension and Pentecost Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Collierville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Washington, DC Tags Submit a Job Listing Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Albany, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Pjcabbiness says: Comments are closed. Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA May 18, 2017 at 11:06 pm It is too bad a print ready bulletin insert is not available.It took quite a bit of time and some juggling to put something together. Rector Tampa, FL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Course Director Jerusalem, Israel May 18, 2017 at 6:01 pm We should all participate in this worthy endeavor. Featured Jobs & Calls Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Melanie Barbarito says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA last_img read more

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El Obispo Presidente Curry participará en la procesión del 24 de…

first_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY El Obispo Presidente de la Iglesia Episcopal, Michael Curry, se unirá a otros líderes religiosos y ancianos de la iglesia en Washington, DC para lanzar la Declaración para Rescatar a Jesús en un servicio religioso seguido de una vigilia silenciosa a la luz de las velas frente a la Casa Blanca, el 24 de mayo.Todos están invitados a asistir al evento, comenzando a las 7 de la noche hora del este en la National City Christian Church, 5 Thomas Circle NW, Washington DC. En el servicio en la Iglesia, el Obispo Presidente Curry se unirá a 10 líderes religiosos y ancianos en oración y predicación.Después del servicio en la iglesia, a las 8:30 de la noche, un grupo que se estima constará de más de mil  personas seguirá al Obispo Presidente Curry y a los líderes religiosos y ancianos mientras van en procesión desde la National City Christian Church hasta la Casa Blanca.“El servicio en la iglesia, la procesión a la Casa Blanca y la vigilia silenciosa a la luz de las velas se planifican en respuesta a las crisis morales y políticas en los niveles más altos de liderazgo político que ponen en juego tanto el alma de la nación como la integridad de la fe cristiana”, señaló el reverendo Jim Wallis, presidente y fundador de Sojourners. “Los ancianos llaman a todos los cristianos a recordar que nuestra identidad en Jesús precede a cualquier otra identidad”.La Declaración para Rescatar a Jesús se encuentra aquí.La Oficina de Comunicaciones de la Iglesia Episcopal transmitirá el servicio en la iglesia, la procesión y la vigilia silenciosa. La transmisión en vivo estará disponible aquí. El horarioEl servicio en la National City Christian Church comienza a las 7 de la noche. La procesión a la Casa Blanca comienza a las 8:30 de la noche hora del este. Se espera que la vigilia silenciosa de velas comience de la 8:45 de la noche y dure hasta las 10 de la noche.Los líderes religiosos y ancianosLos líderes religiosos y los ancianos representan a muchas tradiciones cristianas: iglesias evangélicas, protestantes, católicas romanas y afroamericanas.Incluyendo al Obispo Presidente Curry, otros participantes en el servicio en la iglesia y la vigilia serán:El Rdo. Dr. Walter Brueggemann, Profesor Emérito, Seminario Teológico ColumbiaEl Dr. Tony Campolo, Cofundador, Red Letter ChristiansEl Rdo. Dr. James Forbes, Presidente y Fundador de la Fundación Healing of the Nations y Profesor de Predicación en el Union Theological SeminaryEl Rdo. Wesley Granberg-Michaelson, Secretario General Emérito de la Iglesia Reformada de AméricaEl Rdo. Dr. Richard Hamm, ex Ministro General y Presidente de la Iglesia Cristiana (Discípulos de Cristo)El P. Richard Rohr, Fundador, Centro de Acción y ContemplaciónEl Dr. Ron Sider, Presidente Emérito de Evangélicos para la Acción SocialEl Rdo. Jim Wallis, Presidente y Fundador, SojournersLa Rda. Dra. Sharon Watkins, Directora, NCC Verdad e Iniciativa de Justicia RacialLa Dra. Barbara Williams-Skinner, Co-organizadora, Red Nacional de Clero Afroamericana; Presidente, Skinner Leadership InstituteNo se requiere inscripción anticipada para participar en el servicio en la iglesia, para la procesión y la vigilia; sin embargo, se recomienda a los participantes que marquen su asistencia en Facebook aquí. Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Office of Public Affairs, Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Press Release Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector Columbus, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Collierville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York center_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Tags In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC El Obispo Presidente Curry participará en la procesión del 24 de mayo con vigilia en la Casa Blanca El servicio en la iglesia, la procesión y la vigilia serán transmitidos en vivo Rector Hopkinsville, KY Presiding Bishop Michael Curry Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Albany, NY Press Release Service Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Bath, NC Submit a Job Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Posted May 17, 2018 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI last_img read more