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Unsettled weather West as severe storm threat develops South

first_imgABC NewsBY: DANIEL MANZO, ABC NEWS(NEW YORK) — After a turbulent week, the weather pattern this weekend is looking much quieter across the country.However, a new storm is beginning to move through the Western U.S. and it will bring mountain snow and some rain to the major western cities.Any rain across most of the Western U.S., and especially in Southern California, is very much welcomed at the moment but the rain looks like it might just miss Los Angeles where they have received less than half the average of their wet season rainfall to date.Some mountain snow could also make for treacherous travel, especially in the mountains passes in the Sierra.By Monday, some of this activity will move into the Central U.S. and become the next organized system that will bring impactful weather to the eastern half of the nation.After receiving their fourth largest snowstorm on record earlier this week, it appears another round of snow is headed for the Denver metro area by Monday.Additionally, the developing storm will spark the next round of severe weather with strong storms developing later Monday across Oklahoma and Texas. The risk includes the threat of damaging winds.By Tuesday and Wednesday, the threat for rain and strong storms will move further south and east.There will likely be another severe weather threat across portions of the Gulf states in this time frame.The result of this pattern is, locally, over a foot of snow in some of the northern Rockies and Cascades through Monday.Several inches of snow will be possible in the urban corridor of Colorado as well on Monday and, locally, 2 to 3 inches of rain is possible through Monday in parts of the central Plains and Midwest.The other big news is that it is officially spring this morning and spring-like temperatures will surge into the Midwest and Northeast over the next few days.Temperatures will likely be 10 to 15 degrees above average in the coming days across this region.Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Council push to sell care

first_img Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. Local authority wants law changed to enable it to sell its OH services tosmall-and medium-sized firmsNottinghamshire County Council is pressing for a change in the law to allowit to sell its OH services to local businesses. Personnel director Terry Gorman said there is strong demand from small- andmedium-sized enterprises, which cannot afford their own OH department, to buythe service from the council. “We cannot do work in the private sector,” said Gorman. “Wehave a first-rate OH service; we have been asked to provide that service toparts of the private sector, but we cannot.” Gorman is using his position as new president of the local governmentpersonnel managers’ body Socpo to press for a clause in the current Local GovernmentBill to permit such trading. This would bring councils into line with NHStrusts, many of which are providers of outsourced OH services to the privatesector. His call comes as Health Secretary Alan Milburn put pressure on more NHStrust OH departments to sell their services to local employers (see right). The RCN’s OH adviser Carol Bannister said Nottinghamshire council couldlearn from the Queen’s Medical Centre in Nottingham. “They have a hugenumber of contracts but they have always increased the number of staff. If theyget a new contract, they get a new nurse.” Pressure for change in local councils comes from the Best Value scheme,under which they must provide better value for money than the private sector.Socpo argues that it is unfair competition as the private providers can takelocal authority business, but not vice versa. Council push to sell careOn 1 Apr 2000 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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Asda staff work up to a ‘frenzy’ on prize course

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. Thewinners of Personnel Today’s overall HR Excellence Award for 2000 completed ateambuilding event called Madhouse Frenzy as part of their prize last month. Asda’s 28-strong people development team was split into groups and had to completea number of tasks to earn “money” which then went towards buyingprops for a final presentation. The team, which was also named Personnel Today’s Training Excellence Awardwinners at the ceremony in November, travelled to Pontefract to take part inthe event, run by Impact Development Training Group. Sam Carey, marketing manager of Impact Development Training Group, said,”A challenging team development event enables people to get to know eachother in a less formal situation, which will help to develop trust andcommitment at a deeper level. “Basically, if people understand each other, they are more inclined tolike each other, and people who like each other tend to work better as ateam.” Although most “tasks” put to the teams were fun, they did containa serious element, and involved team members working together, using differentstrengths and skills to their best advantage. Projects included putting up a tent blindfold and earning cash by singingBohemian Rhapsody. Impact Development Training Group’s Carey explained, “The tasksthemselves have been designed to highlight all qualities of both the team andthe individuals, from mental agility to downright exhibitionism. It reallyhelps individuals discover characteristics about themselves and bonds the teamtogether as a whole.” Team member Alex Sissons, , said, “I loved it – I got to work withpeople I don’t usually get tog- ether with. It was certainly inspiring.” New staff have joined Asda’s people development team since winning theawards, and its head, Paul McKinlay, wanted the opportunity to furtherintegrate them into the team and get to know them personally. Sarah Lowey, who started as development manager the following week, said,”I wanted to go on the day so I didn’t feel as if I was missing out. Ifelt part of the team immediately.” The HR team spent two hours in the blazing sun completing a range ofpractical tasks, including lowering a cane to the floor using all members ofthe team, defusing a bomb aided only by minimal household items, and gettingthe team from A to B across a highly dangerous electricity field. They thenmade final presentations themed around Asda’s values. Nicki Seignot, who has been with the company for 15 years and is now peopledevelopment manager of Talent Store, was impressed. “Because of the numberof new team members this is an ideal time to experiment with new ideas. Ourstructure is such that we have a number of smaller teams within a large team,so with this we have got the whole team mixing in which is great.” www.personneltoday.com/awardswww.impact-dtg.com  Asda staff work up to a ‘frenzy’ on prize courseOn 12 Jun 2001 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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UK trade body warns of up to 30,000 North Sea job losses amid pandemic

first_imgUK Oil and Gas (OGUK) says significant job losses in the UK are likely as North Sea capital investment expected to plunge to lowest in two decades North Sea job losses likely amid low price environment and continued market uncertaintyWith revenues drying up across the productive North Sea region, and a “significant degree of uncertainty” over near-term outlooks, OGUK has set out an action plan that includes demands for improved financial stimulus packages as well as the integration of the net-zero transition into recovery plans.The association’s chief executive Deirdre Michie said: “With historic low oil and gas prices coming so soon after one of the most severe downturns our sector has experienced, these findings confirm an especially bleak outlook for the UK’s oil and gas industry.“If the UK is to maintain its supply of domestic energy, protect jobs and build the critical infrastructure it needs to transition to a net-zero future, ours is an industry worth fighting for.” The UK’s oil and gas industry is under pressure from coronavirus (Credit: Wikimedia Commons/Erik Christensen) Up to 30,000 job losses could be recorded across the UK’s North Sea oil and gas sector as the effects of coronavirus continue to plague markets.The warning comes from the UK Oil and Gas (OGUK) trade association, which today (28 April) delivered a “grim outlook” for the industry, and called for “urgent action” to protect both jobs and energy security.Coronavirus has destroyed demand for oil, while swiftly-disappearing storage capacity is exerting further downwards pressure on commodity prices already damaged by a global oversupply. UK oil and gas capital spending could fall by 30% this yearOil and gas operators have begun working with restrained capital spending budgets as they seek to tighten their finances amid the pandemic-caused market pressures, and OGUK expects the UK industry – largely dominated by North Sea activity – to be badly affected.A decrease in UK capital spending of up to 30% is expected as a result of activity deferrals, with investment levels in the sector expected to be as little as £3.5bn — their lowest in two decades.Operational expenditure is also expected to decline by as much as 20% compared to pre-coronavirus forecasts, falling to around £6bn.These factors, coupled with the broader effects of an anticipated 50% decline in drilling activity across supply chains, have led OGUK to warn of a “dramatic reduction” in revenues – as much as 30% this year – for the UK industry that raises concerns about potential bankruptcies. Current crisis ‘more severe’ than those that came beforeWhile the North Sea industry has weathered economic shocks before – most recently the market crisis of 2014 – the trade body warns that the current situation is likely to prove “more severe”.Companies still recovering from the previous oil collapse are now faced with a new set of problems to contend with, as commodity prices sink to their lowest levels in decades and international demand forecasts reveal huge levels of decline throughout the rest of the year.Brent crude, the benchmark commodity that underpins the North Sea industry, has been persistently trading at under $30 per barrel since March, and is currently priced at below $20 per barrel.Last week, it briefly dipped below $16 per barrel – a 20-year low – while the average price throughout March of $22.5 per barrel represented a 65% decrease compared to January.Storage concerns in the US sent West Texas Intermediate – the US crude benchmark – into negative price territory last week following a frenzied sell-off by traders ahead of the May contract delivery deadline – adding to the negative sentiment currently surrounding oil markets.last_img read more

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Spanish frigate to lead Mediterranean operation Sea Guardian

first_img View post tag: ESPS Navarra View post tag: Italian Navy Spanish frigate to lead Mediterranean operation Sea Guardian February 9, 2018 Spanish Navy frigate ESPS Navarra will be leading a three-ship NATO group during the Mediterranean Sea operation Sea Guardian, the Spanish defense ministry announced.In addition to the Spanish Santa Maria-class frigate, the group will include Belgian frigate BNS Louise Marie and an Italian Navy ship.The three ships are set to meet up in the Port of Cartagena during a port visit which will take place between February 9 and 13. After they get underway, the ships will spend some three weeks conducting focused security patrols in the Mediterranean Sea.Operation Sea Guardian in general focuses on maritime situational awareness, counter-terrorism and regional capacity building.ESPS Navarra (F-85) is the fifth unit of the six Santa María-class frigates built in Ferrol and delivered to the Spanish Navy in 1993. She has a complement of 200 people and is equipped with the necessary sensors and weapons to operate as a blue water escort. View post tag: Op Sea Guardian Authorities Share this article View post tag: Spanish Navy View post tag: Belgian Navy Back to overview,Home naval-today Spanish frigate to lead Mediterranean operation Sea Guardian last_img read more

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Thanks for a wonderful night of music

first_imgTo the Editor:On Wednesday evening, December 13, I had the extreme pleasure to attend the Henry E. Harris Winter Concert. I would like to congratulate Ms. Kleinmann – Instrumental Music Director, Mr. Hrechynsky – Vocal Music Director and Mr. Schoener – Percussion and Beg. Brass Instructor, along with all the children who performed. There were so many different groups with a total of almost 180 children performing at different times. We heard from the 3rd Grade Violinists – this was the first time these students played the violin and they did great! Violinists were followed by the Elementary Orchestra, Elementary Band, 5th Grade Advanced Band, Elementary Choir, Middle School Choir, Middle School Orchestra, Middle School Band, and concert concluded with the amazing Henry E. Harris Jazz Band. It was a wonderful night filled with holiday music, family, and friends. Thank you students and teachers for all your hard work. It shows and is greatly appreciated by your audience. MARGARET LoPRESTIlast_img read more

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SEAS Professor of the Practice Jim Waldo named University CTO

first_imgJim Waldo, currently Gordon McKay Professor of the Practice of Computer Science at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), has been named as the University’s Chief Technology Officer, effective June 6.In his role as chief technology officer, Waldo will be responsible for the architecture and implementation of the Harvard University technology environment in support of research, teaching, and administration.He will lead the creation of technology standards and practices that position us to flexibly meet the needs the Harvard community.In addition to teaching courses in distributed computing, and privacy and technology at SEAS, Waldo has been a senior staff engineer at VMWare Inc., a distinguished engineer and principal investigator at Sun Laboratories and Sun Microsystems, as well as a consulting engineer at Hewlett-Packard and elsewhere.Waldo has also done research and product development in the areas of medical sensing, object-oriented programming and systems, distributed computing, and user environments.He edited the book The Evolution of C++: Language Design in the Marketplace of Ideas (MIT Press), and was one of the authors of The Jini Specification (Addison Wesley). He is also the author of Java: The Good Part (O’Reilly).Waldo is an alumnus of University of Utah (B.S. in philosophy, M.A. in linguistics, M.A. in philosophy) and the University of Massachusetts, Amherst (Ph.D. in philosophy). He has an outstanding breadth of skills and is the holder of numerous patents, and the author of numerous publications. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Graduate School of Design exhibit features maps from library collections

first_img“Cartographic Grounds: Projecting the Landscape Imaginary” will be on display in the Gund Hall Lobby until December 19.The exhibit melds data-driven and experiential depictions of the ground though cartography and landscape architectural drawing.The exhibition features maps from more than 20 Harvard libraries, including the Harvard Map Collection, Frances Loeb Library, Ernst Mayr Library and Widener Library, as well as reproductions of maps from the British Geological Society, Bibliothèque Nationale de France and NASA.“The idea stemmed from a conversation about how design drawings have lost their precision with regard to the way in which they depict ground surfaces,” said Jill Desimini, exhibit curator and assistant professor of landscape architecture at the GSD. Pieces displayed in the exhibit are organized into four categories determined by subject matter: terrestrial practices, aqueous explorations, subsurface inventions and temporal itineraries.last_img read more

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Alum starts soccer foundation

first_img2011 Notre Dame graduate Jeb Brovsky plays soccer for a living in Major League Soccer. Rather than only play for his own paycheck, however, Brovsky hopes to use the sport to create change the world over. To do so, he founded Peace Pandemic, a foundation to promote cross-cultural understanding through soccer camps. Brovsky said the group was in India last December to host a soccer clinic for children,. The foundation not only affected the children, its work affected several others as well, he said. “One day towards the end of the trip, [Manoj, the group’s taxi driver] approached me with a soccer ball wrapped in a plastic bag and tears in his eyes,” Brovsky said. “My translator told me Manoj was so inspired … that he saved up 250 rupees to buy his son his first soccer ball. He saw the influence of this sport and wanted his son to feel what these kids [in the clinic] felt.” This weekend, Peace Pandemic will host a two-day 3-on-3 co-ed soccer tournament at Reihle Field next to the Stepan Center to raise funds for camps similar to the one held in India. Brovsky said the tournament is open to all Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross students. “The goal of the tournament is to raise awareness and funds for our camps abroad,” he said. “This particular tournament [is for] our camp this winter for boys and girls in Guatemala.” Senior Will Walsh, the project coordinator, said planning for the event began over a year ago. The Notre Dame Brazil Club as well as men’s and women’s soccer teams will volunteer at the tournament, he said. “The tournament itself is set up like the World Cup,” he said. “Teams will compete in a bracket on Saturday, and the top ones will advance to finals. On Sunday, those teams will play in a single elimination tournament.” The winners will receive t-shirts and gift cards to a local restaurant, Walsh said. The victors will also have the chance to play in a separate game against five Notre Dame soccer players. “Soccer is one thing that really permeates through different cultures,” he said. “We hope a lot of kids come out and play for a good cause.” Brovsky said the idea for this event and for Peace Pandemic originated during his studies at Notre Dame. Peace Pandemic blended his passion for social change, peace studies, soccer and entrepreneurship into one, he said. “I saw the enormous potential of soccer to bridge cultural, national, social, economic, ethnic and religious gaps in the world today,” Brovsky said. Peace Pandemic hosted its first international camps in the India this past December, he said. The clinics combined sport and health to teach children basic soccer skills and illness-prevention hygiene. Brovsky said the camp coached boys in the morning and girls in the evening. At the end of each session, children met with staff in individual health sessions. “With the boys, we want to focus more on the messages of nonviolence and responsibility. We talk about the equality of women with them and the importance of treating [girls] with respect and love,” he said. “We want the boys to feel like their aspirations in life are attainable and that they can change the world for the better.” Brovsky said the message for girls is tailored toward empowerment. He said he hopes the clinics open them to opportunities in the future. “The girls were astonished to see Caitlin [Phelan], the manager of our Peace Pandemic medical staff, and hear her speak with such confidence and direction,” he said. “They had no idea that a woman could hold that position, let alone go to school for medicine.” Brovsky said running an international foundation has its challenges, the rewards are greater than he ever expected. “After coaching and staying in the slums with these boys and girls, it not only changes their lives but it changes yours as well,” he said. “I know that anyone who is involved internationally with Peace Pandemic walks away with a new perspective, skill and more compassionate outlook on the world.” Brovsky said as the number of soccer camps and tournaments held worldwide increase, the impact they make will grow as well. The tournament at Notre Dame is one small step in building momentum for this progress, he said. “The more understanding and unity that we bring just through conversation and the sport of soccer moves the world one step closer towards peace,” he said. “Obviously this one soccer tournament won’t change the course of history, but this one soccer tournament will certainly change at least one young child’s life for the better.” Registration will take place this week in LaFortune Student Center on Wednesday and Thursday. Teams of three to five people can register for $20. More information on the foundation can be found at http://peacepandemic.blogspot.com/. Contact Nicole Toczauer at [email protected]last_img read more

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Understanding digital platforms:The future of database technology

first_img 6SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Digital Transformation leads to better profits for 80 percent of companies that pursue it, reports SAP Center for Business Insight and Oxford Economics. In fact, 31 percent of decision makers said investment in employees’ digital skills would be key in increasing revenue in the coming years, and some 80 percent of companies that have undergone digital transformation efforts reported increased profitability, compared to 53 percent of other companies.While digital transformation is a term most credit union executives hear often, it can mean different things to different people. With new fintech innovations hitting the headlines on a daily basis, discerning which technologies to embrace – and which to simply watch in the near term – can be a challenge.Consider blockchain technology as a case in point.Following Bitcoin’s wild ups and downs on Wall Street, blockchain technology is fast emerging as a fintech disruptor that promises to become a household name – but for many reasons, not all financial-related. continue reading »last_img read more