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$50K reward offered in the Jayme Closs abduction case is under review, officials say

first_imgBarron County Sheriff(BARRON, Wis.) — It’s not clear where the $50,000 reward offered in the Jayme Closs kidnapping case will go now that the 13-year-old is home safe, Barron County Sheriff Chris Fitzgerald said.Suspect Jake Patterson, 21, is accused of gunning down Closs’ parents in Barron, Wisconsin, on Oct. 15 and fleeing with the 13-year-old to his rural Wisconsin home. Closs managed to escape Thursday after allegedly being held captive there for nearly three months.Closs’ mysterious abduction sparked a massive, months-long investigation involving the FBI, who offered a reward up to $25,000 for information leading to her whereabouts.The Jennie-O Turkey company, where Closs’ parents worked, also offered a $25,000 reward, said Leonard Peace, spokesperson for the FBI in Milwaukee.No decision has been made on what to do with that combined $50,000 reward, said Fitzgerald, who told ABC News Wednesday the “discussion is ongoing.”Peace echoed the sheriff, telling ABC News “the reward is still under review.”Closs, lauded by officials for making what they called a brave break for freedom, told police she crawled out from where Patterson allegedly trapped her under his bed when he left the house Thursday.Closs fled the home and approached a woman walking her dog to plead for help, officials said. The dog walker rushed Closs to a neighbor who called 911.“Jayme is a hero in this case, no question about it,” the sheriff told reporters Friday. “She’s the one that helped us break the case.”Patterson, who is charged with two counts of first-degree intentional homicide, kidnapping and armed burglary, has not entered a plea.He is due to return to court on Feb. 6. Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Drrrr-iving Finalists to distraction

first_imgFinalists have issued formal complaints to the Proctors Office about disruptions caused by intermittent drilling just outside Examination Schools.On Tuesday morning, English Finalists sitting their Middle English Paper were left unable to concentrate as loud drilling took place on the High Street. The English students were taking the second of their seven examinations when the silence of the hall was disturbed by the sounds of “lots of reversing trucks” and “loud drilling”.Staff at the Examination Schools attempted to stop the roadworks taking place but their requests were ignored by the workmen. As a result, Finalists had to cope with the off-putting noise for the duration of the three-hour exam.Ché Ramsden, who was taking the Middle English Paper, said, “The drilling stopped and started all through the exam, which made it really hard to concentrate and remain focussed. It was really hot that day and so all the windows were open, which didn’t help. The noise just flooded the room.”At the end of the exam, students were told by the main invigilator that the examiners would be made aware of the circumstances.Ramsden added, “The examiner in the room seemed really sympathetic. I assume that if it was something planned in advance then the Proctors would have made themselves aware of what was happening outside Exam Schools during this period, and we would have been informed.”Responding to student anger about the noise levels, the University has stated that it has no authority over the roadworks being done by the Oxford County Council. The roadworks were supposed to have finished before the exam season, but since they have fallen behind schedule the University is unable to control the levels of noise during exams in the Examination Schools.In normal circumstances, the University tries to ensure that roadworks do not disrupt exams. However, in this case, unanticipated changes to the schedule for the roadworks meant that the University was only notified at the very last minute. The High Street roadworks are part of a “Major Project of Improvement” by the County Council. They have been going on since summer 2009, and were due to be finished by 6 May 2010, but are behind schedule. The Council was unavailable to comment at this time.The University has assured students that it understands that there will not be further disruptions but declined to comment further.However, the main concerns surround the affected English students and the future marking of their exam papers. The University currently has no official policy on road noise and the University Proctors are currently investigating the problems caused by the drilling.One finalist, Alexandra Hedges, told Cherwell that she had been unaffected by the noise during her exam but agreed that it had been a problem for others.She said, “I think I’m the only person in the whole hall who didn’t notice the drilling. I seem to have developed the ability to zone out when I’m working – no one could believe I hadn’t heard it, especially as I was by the window!”For others, the sporadic sounds of drilling added significantly to the stress of the exam experience. Among many finalists, there is concern that the roadworks placed added pressure on their ability to perform well. While one said that the roadworks had been “disturbing”, another said that the noise was “really annoying”.A spokesperson for the University Proctors said that they were looking into the complaints made by the students but were unable to comment further.last_img read more

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Contamination hunt continues

first_imgAllied Bakeries has almost ruled out sabotage on its production line after glass and needles were found in Kingsmill loaves.Three contaminated loaves have been reported in the last fortnight, although the objects were discovered inside the packaging rather than the bread itself.Allied has DNA-tested the 300 staff at its Orpington plant, where a police investigation is focused. Security has been stepped up, with staff restricted to certain areas and CCTV cameras installed.Said a spokeswoman: “We’re still not sure where contamination is taking place but we think it’s not on the production line.”Consumers found fragments of glass, sewing needles, chewing gum and plastic in packs of sliced bread produced at the Orpington site in July 2005, and then again in September that year. This prompted a police investigation into the contamination.Allied Bakeries is working closely with the Food Standards Agency and the police on the latest investigation. The spokeswoman added: “We take consumer safety very seriously and continue to take all necessary action to ensure our products are safe.”She urged consumers to be cautious and report any problems to the company careline.last_img read more

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Briefs

first_imgn Paul Wilkinson, former executive chairman of RHM Foods, has been appointed a non-executive director of Fengrain, a grain co-operative in the Eastern Counties.n Irwin’s Nutty Krust batch bread has been nominated Northern Ireland’s best-loved product, beating local brands such as Tayto to rank number one in a vote by Tesco customers across the province. Nutty Krust now accounts for over half of all batch bread sold in NI.n Equipment supplier Creeds and the National Association of Master Bakers have become the latest exhibitors to sign up for the Baking Industry Exhibition in April 2008 at Birmingham’s NEC.n Catering supplier Brakes picked up eight trophies for new products at the British Frozen Food Federation 2007 Annual Awards, including Best New Bakery/Pastries Product for its Premiere Focaccia and Best New Dessert/Ice Cream/Confectionery Product for its Tray of Profiteroles & Chocolate Mousse.n Zedz Foods, which specialises in ’free-from’ snacks and treats is already taking orders for Christmas. The Powys-based company is taking part in True Food Marketing’s Celtic Recipes Programme, designed to help Welsh food producers improve their marketing and sales skills.n The Flour Advisory Bureau is working with HGCA on an updated education website and programme – The Grain Chain – which will be launched in early September. This will feature interactive information in line with the curriculum requirements for key stages two and three.last_img read more

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In my world – the organic bakery

first_img== Jo Fairley is co-owner of Judges organic bakery and grocery shop in Hastings and co-founder of Green & Black’s chocolate firm, with hubby Craig Sams ==In 1991, long before we took over Judges Bakery in Hastings Old Town, my husband Craig Sams and I started a little chocolate brand called Green & Black’s. I say ’little’ because it truly was: our first order from the French factory was for £20,000-worth of chocolate – funded from the sale of my Fulham flat, before I moved in with Craig.And if you had told me on day one that, one day, our ’baby’ brand, which was by then turning over £25m a year, would be sold to Cadbury’s, a) I wouldn’t have believed you, and b) I probably would have been too paralysed with fear to put one foot in front of the other. Certainly too scared to think of a name, design the packaging and make the first tentative calls to the natural food trade, which we were pretty sure would respond positively to the world’s first organic chocolate…Today, there’s so much talk about ’exit strategies’. In a recent edition of British Baker, entrepreneur Umer Ashraf, owner of the Glasgow-based iCafé chain of shops, argued that businesses need to have an exit strategy when they start. An entire document on exit strategies from Coutt’s (whom I don’t bank with) also thumped on to my desk recently, entitled The Long Goodbye. Certainly today, most entrepreneurs seeking bank finance will be asked what their ’exit strategy’ is – and it’s expected to be written into a business plan.Of course, not all of us want to die with our boots (or our aprons) on, and many would like to retire at some point – in which case a plan for how to dispose of the business, or who is going to take over, is wise. But I would also argue that although it encourages long-term planning, an exit strategy could hamper creativity. And in turn, that might affect the long-term outcome for the business. In any case, right now, it’s a tricky time to focus on the business exit, when many routes seem to have been closed off: activity in the buy-out industry has virtually halted, merger and acquisition activity has slowed, and initial public offerings are all but non-existent.When we started, little brands didn’t get gobbled up by big brands; this was before L’Oréal bought out The Body Shop, or Unilever swallowed Ben & Jerry’s, for example. So a deal like that was never on our radar. So we were free to be as inventive as we wanted. We had an eye on the bottom line, of course, but we never had a ’marketing budget’, for instance. If something felt right, we did it: ultimately, we printed a million recipe leaflets, and distributed them among Green & Black’s fans, celebrity chefs and cookery writers – and it paid huge dividends. We did what we did because we believed in it and felt we could change the world through business.If we had thought about the ultimate sale of the business, I think we’d have had a different approach – less free, less inspired, more ’grey-suit’. Now, largely thanks to the sale of Green & Black’s, we have a thriving bakery in Hastings. Do I think about an exit strategy? No, because we love what we do. We’re still trying to change the world, one organic pink meringue pig or wholemeal sourdough at a time. And if you’re having fun, why on earth would you want to stop, just to stare at a sunset? Call me naïve, but I believe that if you follow your bliss, the exit will take care of itself.last_img read more

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Body in river identified as that of man reported missing

first_img WhatsApp (Photo Supplied/South Bend Police Department) The body found in the St. Joseph River on Wednesday, Nov. 18, was identified as that of a man who was reported missing.Garrett Gilpin, 32, was reported missing back on Oct. 17.He was last seen at the Burger King restaurant on LaSalle Avenue.Authorities recovered his body in the water near Marion and Riverside Drive.There was no initial signs of foul play. Twitter Facebook Pinterest Google+ IndianaLocalNews WhatsApp Google+ Facebook Pinterest Twitter Body in river identified as that of man reported missing By Jon Zimney – November 19, 2020 0 686 Previous articleAnnual radiothon for St. Margaret’s House underway on 95.3 MNCNext articleIn-person hearings at Elkhart City Court during COVID red zone status Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney.last_img read more

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Long Island Festival Adds Gov’t Mule, Taking Back Sunday, Spafford & More To Eclectic Lineup

first_imgThe Great South Bay Music Festival, set to take place July 13-16 on Long Island, has been gradually releasing its daily lineups. The latest announcement has revealed that on Saturday, July 15th, the festival will see performances from Gov’t Mule, G. Love & Special Sauce, Rusted Root, and Spafford.The eclectic lineup is being revealed in stages via the event’s social media accounts, with each day focusing on a different type of music. Thursday, July 13th will feature alt-rock and emo favorites like Taking Back Sunday, New Found Glory, Saves The Day, and Frank Iero & the Patience. Friday, July 14th will feature a reggae-centric lineup including 311, The Wailers, New Politics, and The Skints.As of now, we are still awaiting the lineup for the fourth and final day of the festival, Sunday, July 16th, as well as various additions to the overall roster as the event draws closer.Great South Bay is the biggest and longest-running four-day “American Themed” music, art & cultural event on Long Island. Situated on the magnificent Great South Bay, the event features approximately 60 performers on 4 stages, including music legends, contemporary favorites, and local emerging rock, jazz, country, folk, funk, zydeco, and jam bands, representing a large array of different American musical styles.Well known as a “Family Friendly Music Fest”, the festival is committed to excellence in “Fun” education! Parents (and, of course, their kids) will love the festival’s “KIDZONE,” which features quality fun and engaging entertainment for children of all ages during the day on Saturday and Sunday, July 15th and 16th.In addition to the music, The Great South Bay Music Festival will feature its long-running “Artisan Market,” featuring a diverse collection of interesting hand-made items from the U.S. and abroad. The event will also include a diverse food court, multiple beer and wind gardens, art installations, and a “Chill Tent,” in addition to the cool breeze off the bay, the amazing views, and much more!For more information, to purchase tickets, and to keep an eye out for the remaining artist announcements, head to the event’s website.last_img read more

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Being ‘smart’ about her education

first_imgThis is one in a series of profiles showcasing some of Harvard’s stellar graduates.Nothing lights up Amanda Rich’s face like numbers.Whether it’s about DNA, CO2 emissions, or census blocks, “I love data, I love numbers, I love everything about it,” Rich said. While she worked to earn a bachelor’s degree in biology, then a master’s in forensic science, then another master’s in liberal arts, she thrived on a diet of facts and figures, analysis, and hard data.And now, inspired by her work in Harvard Extension School’s Sustainability Program, Rich was able to combine her favorite interests in a capstone project that created an action plan to increase Boston’s tree canopy coverage to 35 percent by 2030 by strategically placing long-lived, hardy trees in low-income and minority neighborhoods.If her plan were implemented, she said, the city could increase its return on investment while reducing greenhouse gas emissions and energy costs in the affected neighborhoods.Rich attributes her environmental interests to growing up near Lake Erie, in tiny Fredonia, N.Y. After earning her biology degree at Rochester Institute of Technology, she went on to Virginia Commonwealth University, taking a full load while working full time analyzing DNA for Pfizer. “That was when ‘CSI’ was big and it seemed a very sexy thing to do. It was very enticing for the analytical mind, but it wasn’t as attractive and cool as a lot of people thought, because there wasn’t any of the problem-solving or criminal element involved,” Rich said.And the schedule had her burning the candle at both ends. “It was chaos,” she said. She began having absence seizures, short periods of blanking out while seemingly still fully conscious. When her doctor diagnosed her with epilepsy, Rich had to learn not only how to control the disease, but also how to integrate that new reality into her academic and professional careers.“I’m not going to lie, I’ve had to work 120 percent in comparison to other students’ 80, because there are nights when you’re looking at a computer screen and you’re, like, I’m not even sure those are words,” Rich said. “But the 120 percent I worked was 100 percent worth it.”Her epilepsy means that Rich can no longer drive, so she and her husband, Brodie, must live in a mass transportation hub. When he was offered a job in Boston, she said, “We sold everything we had and picked up and flew by the seat of our pants. Which was awesome.”Rich found work at EMD Millipore, assigning expiration dates on its downstream filtration devices, but soon realized she wanted more.“I was very solid in my analytical skills, very solid in program improvement and development, and I wanted to integrate that into continuous improvement,” she said. “I’ve always had a little obsession with the environment and a lot of green concepts, but I wasn’t sure which path I wanted.”Drawn to urban planning, Rich attended Boston Architectural College’s landscape program for a semester. It was a poor fit.“It was 75 percent creativity and 25 percent data-driven and that just wasn’t me,” she said. “I missed quantitative analysis and numbers and data and research and technical reporting. I missed all the scientific elements I’d survived on for so long.”Rich started researching the Extension School. “I knew I didn’t want to go into debt again, so I was going to be very smart about it,” she said. “I started looking into class offerings and who was teaching them, and I was surprised to see that the majority were Harvard-based professors or from Northeastern or Tufts. I was, like, OK, I can get an Ivy League education for a fraction of the cost.”In spring 2015, Rich started in the sustainability program. With her husband’s support, she was able to attend full time, working through summer weekends and holidays — “On the Fourth of July I could see the flashes of fireworks from my window, but I had an assignment literally due the next day,” she said — and earning her master’s in just 18 months.One of the first classes she took was “Sustainability Business and Technology,” and she loved it. “They had us design our own invention and then design a business model around it. It really took me out of my comfort zone, but I had so much fun with it,” Rich said. Then in Tom Gloria’s class “Industrial Ecology, Concepts, and Practice,” she started the project that led to her capstone.“Boston has a tree-planting initiative to increase our canopy coverage, planting 100,000 trees in the city by 2030,” she explained. “I wanted to take it a step further and ask if Boston goes ahead with this plan, how can it get the most bang for its buck? Identifying neighborhoods, looking at types of trees, what could be done to help reduce CO2 emissions, reduce energy costs, save money — could these factors be tweaked to give them maximum benefit?”With software and a lot of research, Rich created a plan that has been submitted to Austin Blackmon, the city of Boston’s chief of environment, energy, and open space.Today, with a third degree behind her and a clear field ahead, Rich has a chance to appreciate the space she’s in.“When I was an undergrad, I was in my little biology bubble, or my previous master’s program, my forensics bubble, and it was minute. But sustainability, we had everybody. It doesn’t matter if you’re science-based or pharma, we had people from government, from industry, even from law enforcement,” she said of the Extension School program. “What I absolutely loved about it was that it got you out of your little echo chamber and it gave you a lot of new perspectives and opinions that you normally wouldn’t get, even in your other programs.”After she marches in Commencement to receive her A.L.M., Rich will remain connected to Harvard.“I’ll still reach out to professors with questions even though I’ve already graduated. They’re so willing to always help, regardless,” she said. “But that’s kind of the mindset in the sustainability network: People are willing to help out anyone.“It’s not a competition. They’re pushing other people up. It’s a support system. If we’re not going to do it for each other, then nobody else is going to.”last_img read more

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Two Jamestown Residents Sentenced Following Witness Retaliation Conviction

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Stock Image.BUFFALO — Two Jamestown residents have been sentenced to prison after being convicted of conspiracy to retaliate against an informant, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office.Bobby Hunt, 27, and Amy Dean, 31, were sentenced to serve 24 months in prison and a period of time served (approximately three months) respectively by U.S. District Judge Lawrence J. Vilardo.Assistant U.S. Attorney Joshua A. Violanti, who handled the case, said that in October 2018, the defendants conspired to intimidate and/or retaliate against an individual (the victim), whom they believed was sharing information with investigators regarding the drug trafficking activities of Ramael Fields, Jr.Hunt and Dean believed the Victim might also share information about Hunt’s possible involvement in a narcotics conspiracy. Fields was previously arrested in connection with a federal investigation of a large-scale methamphetamine distribution operation in Jamestown. On October 17 and October 25, 2018, Hunt posted a series of Facebook messages regarding individuals “snitching” on the defendant’s “brother,” Ramael Fields, Jr., officials said. On October 25, 2018, Hunt posted a copy of the cover page of the indictment that charged Fields. The cover page included a list of individuals whom Fields and Hunt believed to be federal informants who provided information that led to the arrest of Fields. Hunt received the indictment cover page from Fields, who instructed the defendant to post the page on Facebook. Also on October 25, 2018, Hunt and Dean left the victim several threatening Facebook voice messages, including:Hunt: You know if I go to jail for conspiracy there’s going to be a lot of females after you!Dean: That’s right [expletive] and his sister is one of them so go ahead and try [expletive] cause I live at 124 Barrows and you can come get yourself some, don’t you threaten my little brother!The sentencing is the result of an investigation by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, under the direction of Acting Special Agent-in-Charge Robert Guyton.last_img read more

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Union Bankshares announces Q2 earnings and quarterly dividend payment

first_imgUnion Bank,Union Bankshares, Inc (NASDAQ ‘ UNB) today announced Net Income for the second quarter 2011 of $1.0 million, or $0.23 per share, compared to $1.5 million, or $0.34 per share, for 2010. Results for the second quarter of 2011 reflect a $0.05 decrease in earnings per share due to direct expenses incurred during the quarter related to the May 27, 2011 purchase of branches in Grafton, Littleton and North Woodstock, New Hampshire. There was also an increase in the loan loss provision of $60 thousand due mainly to the growth and composition of the loan portfolio. Non-acquisition operating expenses also increased between years as the Company grew, outsourced and enhanced marketing efforts, and incurred increased OREO costs. Year to date earnings for 2011 were $2.1 million, or $0.46 per share, compared to $2.7 million, or $0.62 per share, for 2010. Year to date direct costs associated with the acquisition of three New Hampshire branches were $358,000; there was a $120,000 increase in the loan loss provision due mainly to the growth and composition of the loan portfolio; the Loan Center was operating throughout 2011 and became profitable in May of 2011; communication lines, equipment and the internal data backup center were upgraded; marketing efforts were outsourced and enhanced; and the operating costs of OREO and Bank properties were higher due to the long winter and wet spring. Balance Sheet accounts increased substantially as the acquisition of the three New Hampshire branches added $67 million to deposits, $33 million to loans and another $5 million to various other asset categories. Total loans grew to $401 million, or 15.1%, as of June 30, 2011 from $349 million as of June 30, 2010 due to the acquisition and in spite of the Company selling $31 million of residential mortgage loans to the secondary market during the first half of 2011 to manage long term interest rate risk. Total deposits reached $433 million compared to the prior year of $354 million. The Company had total capital of $42 million with a book value per share of $9.39 as of June 30, 2011. A quarterly cash dividend of $.25 per share was declared on July 20, 2011 to shareholders of record July 30, 2011, payable August 11, 2011. Union Bankshares, Inc., with headquarters in Morrisville, Vermont is the bank holding company parent of Union Bank, which offers deposit, loan, trust and commercial banking services throughout northern Vermont and northwestern New Hampshire. As of June 30, 2011, the Company had approximately $514 million in consolidated assets compared to $428 million at June 30, 2010. The Company operates 13 banking offices, a loan center and 29 ATM facilities in Vermont; 4 branches and ATM facilities in New Hampshire. Union Bank has been helping people buy homes and local businesses create jobs in area communities since 1891. Union Bank has earned an outstanding reputation for residential lending programs, is an SBA Preferred lender and has an outstanding Community Reinvestment Act rating. Union is proud to be one of the few community banks serving Vermont and New Hampshire and maintains a strong commitment to traditional values. Union is dedicated to providing genuine customer service and community support, donating tens of thousands of dollars to local nonprofits annually. These values-combined with financial expertise, quality products and the latest technology-make Union Bank the premier choice for your banking services, both personal and commercial. Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender. Statements made in this press release that are not historical facts are forward-looking statements. Investors are cautioned that all forward-looking statements necessarily involve risks and uncertainties, and many factors could cause actual results and events to differ materially from those contemplated in the forward-looking statements. When we use any of the words ‘believes,’ ‘expects,’ ‘anticipates’ or similar expressions, we are making forward-looking statements. The following factors, among others, could cause actual results and events to differ from those contemplated in the forward-looking statements: uncertainties associated with general economic conditions; changes in the interest rate environment; inflation; political, legislative or regulatory developments; acts of war or terrorism; the markets’ acceptance of and demand for the Company’s products and services; technological changes, including the impact of the internet on the Company’s business and on the financial services market place generally; the impact of competitive products and pricing; and dependence on third party suppliers. For further information, please refer to the Company’s reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission at www.sec.gov(link is external). Morrisville, VT July 20, 2011 ‘ Union Bankshareslast_img read more