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Minnesota protest live updates: Protesters would’ve faced ‘vicious dogs’: Trump

first_imgIf only I were surprised by this hypocrisy. Minneapolis PD arrests journalists but not murderers from within its own ranks. These problems will require systematic change to start the healing process. It won’t be easy, but it’s essential. https://t.co/2wC3qxLWFT— Benjamin Crump, Esq. (@AttorneyCrump) May 29, 2020 Photos showed members of the National Guard in the streets of Minneapolis. Gov. Tim Walz signed an executive order Thursday activating the Minnesota National Guard after Wednesday night’s destructive protests.10:50 pm.: Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee and former Vice President Joe Biden said he was “furious” over President Donald Trump’s tweet on the protests“I will not lift the President’s tweet. I will not give him that amplification. But he is calling for violence against American citizens during a moment of pain for so many. I’m furious, and you should be too,” Biden wrote.Trump tweeted in the early morning hours of Friday that “when the looting starts, the shooting starts,” referring to the protests. He also called protesters “thugs.” The National Guard has arrived on the scene. They are in Minneapolis and fully prepared. George Floyd will not have died in vain. Respect his memory!!!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) May 29, 2020 Biden said that he will be speaking more later today about the situation in Minneapolis. He also addressed a CNN crew being arrested.“This is not abstract: a black reporter was arrested while doing his job this morning, while the white police officer who killed George Floyd remains free. I am glad swift action was taken, but this, to me, says everything,” Biden said, with the swift action appearing to refer to their release.10:20 a.m.: Melania Trump says there is ‘no reason for violence’First Lady Melania Trump said the nation needs to focus on healing and “there is no reason for violence.”“Our country allows for peaceful protests, but there is no reason for violence,” she tweeted. “I’ve seen our citizens unify & take care of one another through COVID19 & we can’t stop now.”Trump also offered her “deepest condolences” to Floyd’s family. “As a nation, let’s focus on peace, prayers & healing,” the first lady wrote.  10:09 a.m.: City is handling situation in ‘best way that we can,’ city council VP saysMinneapolis’ city council vice president said the government is still adjusting to the situation, but is handling it “in the best way that we can given all of the chaos, all of the unrest, all of the anger and pain in this community.”City Council Vice President Andrea Jenkins told ABC News’ Amy Robach on Friday that the city must take control of the situation and “restore some order back.”She also begged people not to gather in the streets, citing the pandemic and the damage that has been done in the last two nights. Jenkins said that the anger of the community has been expressed and she did not want further action to lead to injuries or loss of life.“We can’t allow this type of civic unrest to continue,” she said.Jenkins on Thursday called on city officials to declare racism a public health crisis.“By declaring racism a public health emergency it provides us the opportunity to name the virus that has infected our American institutions for centuries but in addition, it gives us the opportunities to … you can’t really begin to cure a disease until you know what that disease is. … It’s an infectious disease just like the coronavirus and it’s not just Minneapolis.”9:45 a.m.: Floyd family attorney calls CNN arrest ‘hypocrisy’Civil Rights Attorney Ben Crump, who is representing Floyd’s family, said he was not surprised by the “hypocrisy” of police arresting a CNN crew, but not arresting “murderers from within its own ranks.”“These problems will require systematic change to start the healing process. It won’t be easy, but it’s essential,” Crump wrote on Twitter. Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved. Enough.— Joe Biden (@JoeBiden) May 29, 2020 6:59 a.m.: CNN reporter, crew arrested live on airCNN reporter Omar Jimenez and his production crew were arrested in Minneapolis live on air Friday morning while reporting on the Floyd protests.The news outlet is reporting that police said they were arrested because they were told to move and didn’t.“A CNN reporter & his production team were arrested this morning in Minneapolis for doing their jobs, despite identifying themselves – a clear violation of their First Amendment rights,” CNN said in a statement Friday morning. “The authorities in Minnesota, incl. the Governor, must release the 3 CNN employees immediately.”Minnesota State Sen. Jeff Hayden phoned into CNN and said he just had a joint text with the governor and mayor and that they were just trying to get control of the area and weren’t aware of the CNN reporter getting arrested.“Hoping that we can figure it out,” Hayden said.6:44 a.m.: 70 arrested or summonsed in New York City during George Floyd protestsAt least 70 people were arrested or summonsed during a series of protests that started in Union Square and spread through Lower Manhattan through Thursday night.Most will be summonsed for obstruction of governmental administration and social distancing violations, but there will also be assault and weapon possession charges.The protest began in Union Square after 3 p.m., Thursday but after that broke up, protests reemerged at Foley Square courthouses, City Hall and Zuccotti Park, the site of the 2011 Occupy Wall Street protest, and moved toward the West Side Highway.Several police officers were taken to the hospital with minor injuries, one with a possible concussion.One person was arrested for assaulting a police officer for throwing a garbage can into a crowd and striking a police officer in the head.Another person attempted to grab the service weapon from a Deputy Inspector’s holster. That person will be charged with robbery.1:15 a.m.: Trump says military could assume control in city, ‘when the looting starts, the shooting starts’President Donald Trump weighed in on the destructive protests in Minneapolis early Friday morning, saying the military could “assume control” of the response.“These THUGS are dishonoring the memory of George Floyd, and I won’t let that happen,” Trump tweeted early Friday morning. “Just spoke to Governor Tim Walz and told him that the Military is with him all the way. Any difficulty and we will assume control but, when the looting starts, the shooting starts.”Trump also attacked Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey, saying the protests are a result of a lack of leadership.“Either the very weak Radical Left Mayor, Jacob Frey, get his act together and bring the City under control, or I will send in the National Guard & get the job done right,” Trump tweeted.Frey responded to Trump at an early-morning press conference Friday, saying it’s weakness to point fingers during times of crisis.“Weakness is refusing to take responsibility for your actions. Weakness is pointing your finger at somebody else during a time of crisis,” Frey said. “Donald Trump knows nothing about the strength of Minneapolis. We are strong as hell. Is this a difficult time period? Yes. But you better be damn sure that we’re gonna get through this.”12:48 a.m.: Minneapolis asks residents to ‘retreat’ over precinct explosion possibilityAfter people protesting George Floyd’s death forcibly took over a Minneapolis precinct and began to ignite fires, city officials are now warning residents to leave the area in case the building explodes.“We’re hearing unconfirmed reports that gas lines to the Third Precinct have been cut and other explosive materials are in the building,” the city tweeted. “If you are near the building, for your safety, PLEASE RETREAT in the event the building explodes.”Frey said residents must clear the area so the fire department can put out fires.“We are working with @MinneapolisFire to deliver resources and respond for a beloved neighborhood in our city,” Frey tweeted. “We all need to work together to ensure the safety of our friends, family, and Minneapolis residents. And right now working together means clearing the area.”The Minnesota National Guard has been activated for the area and said it’s helping the fire department safely get to fires to help them battle the blazes.Since the protests started, the Saint Paul Police Department said more than 170 businesses have been damaged or looted. Despite the destruction, with dozens of fires set, authorities said there are no reports of serious injuries. “Calm on the horizon,” the department said late Thursday night.12:32 a.m.: Governor ‘shocked’ after vehicle attempts to run over protesterColorado Gov. Jared Polis said he is “absolutely shocked” by video of a car attempting to run over a person protesting the death of Floyd in Denver on Thursday. What started as a peaceful protest turned chaotic with reports of vandalism and violence.“Tonight is a very sad night for our state. While we are still uncovering all of the facts, a protest regarding the killing of George Floyd devolved into vandalism and violence, and I was absolutely shocked by video evidence of a motorist attempting to run over a protestor,” Polis tweeted. “Coloradans are better than this. I share the immense anguish we all feel about the unjust murder of George Floyd. But let me be clear, senseless violence will never be healed by more violence.”Previously shots were fired across the street from Colorado’s State Capitol in Denver.11:51 p.m.: Protesters gain access to police precinctPeople protesting the death of Floyd have reportedly taken over the Minneapolis Police Department’s 3rd precinct and set it on fire, according to authorities.Minneapolis Police spokesperson John Elder said staff was evacuated from the building around 10 p.m. local time and that protesters forcibly entered the building and ignited several fires.Shortly after reports of the precinct takeover, the Minnesota National Guard said it was deploying more than 500 soldiers to the area.“We have activated more than 500 soldiers to St. Paul, Minneapolis and surrounding communities,” the National Guard said in a statement. “Our mission is to protect life, preserve property and the right to peacefully demonstrate. A key objective is to ensure fire departments are able to respond to calls.”9:20 p.m.: Colorado protest marred by gunshotsProtesters outside Colorado’s State Capitol in Denver received a scare when someone apparently fired shots nearby, causing the assembled group to flee.There were no injuries, authorities confirmed to ABC News.“Officers on scene at W Colfax Ave and W 15 st on shots fired in the area of the Capital. This is an ongoing investigation and the motive is unknown,” Denver police wrote on Twitter.Leslie Herod, who is a state representative, tweeted about the incident as well. She added that someone was apprehended, though police have not confirmed any arrests.The Capitol was put on lockdown, with Herod, who fled inside included. Herod told an ABC News producer she was not scared by the incident.“No. This only makes me more resolved. We have more work to do,” she said.8:31 p.m.: 911 call releasedThe 911 call made by the store owner who accused Floyd of using fraudulent money was released by authorities Thursday evening.According to the transcript of the call released by the state of Minnesota, the caller — a store owner — told the operator that Floyd entered the store drunk and tried to pay for something with “fake bills.” He later left the shop and sat on his car. It was there where police found him when they arrived at the scene.“Someone comes [to] our store and give us fake bills and we realize it before he left the store, and we ran back outside, they was [sic] sitting on their car,” the caller said. “We tell them to give us their phone, put their… thing back and everything, and he was also drunk and everything and return to give us our cigarettes back and so he can, so he can go home but he doesn’t want to do that, and he’s sitting on his car cause he is awfully drunk and he’s not in control of himself.”The operator then asked the caller for Floyd’s race and sex.“No, he’s a black guy,” the caller replied. “Alright,” the operator said, letting out a sigh according to the transcript, before the caller asked, “How is your day going?”6:25 p.m.: Investigation is ‘top priority’ for DOJThe Department of Justice has made the investigation into Floyd’s death a “top priority,” Erica MacDonald, attorney for state of Minnesota, said at a press conference.MacDonald said President Donald Trump and Attorney General Bill Barr are “directly and actively” monitoring the case.“It is critical, it is essential, it is imperative that the investigation is done right and done right the first time,” she said. “And that is what we are going to do.”No federal or state charges against the officers were announced at the press conference.Hennepin County Attorney Michael Freeman asked for “patience.”“Give us the time to do this right and we will bring you justice — I promise,” Freeman said.He said his office has been flooded with calls on the status of the investigation. The main question, he said, has been, “what’re you gonna do about the murder of George Floyd?”“We are going to investigate as thoroughly as justice demands,” Freeman said.He called the officer’s action “excessive and wrong,” but said he needs to determine if it was criminal.Both MacDonald and Freeman called on the public to come forward with any information they may have.There was a delay in starting the press conference, which MacDonald apologized for and said she was hoping to share a development but that it was not the right time.5:35 p.m.: City releases complaint history of 4 officersThe police officer seen in a video with his knee on Floyd’s neck was involved in 18 complaints prior to being fired, according to records released by the city.Derek Chauvin, who was fired following Floyd’s death, was only disciplined for two of those complaints, according to the city records.The documents do not provide the details of the complaints or the disciplines.Tou Thao, who was the officer seen standing up in the video, had six complaints, one of which remains open, according to the records. Thao, who was also fired, was not disciplined for the other five complaints.The other two officers who were fired, Thomas Lane and J Alexander Kueng, have had no complaints.5:15 p.m.: Governor signs executive order activating National GuardGov. Tim Walz signed an executive order activating the Minnesota National Guard following Wednesday night’s protests.Walz said the purpose of the National Guard was “to protect people, to protect people safely demonstrating, and to protect small business owners.”“The anger and grief of this moment is unbearable. People deserve to be seen. People deserve to be heard. People deserve to be safe,” he said in a statement. “While many Minnesotans are taking extensive safety precautions while exercising their right to protest, the demonstration last night became incredibly unsafe for all involved.”The National Guard Adjutant General will work with local government agencies to provide personnel, equipment, and facilities needed to respond to and recover from the protests, according to Walz’s office.There will also be about 200 members of the Minnesota State Patrol that will work with state, county, and local community and public safety partners. State Patrol helicopters and fixed wind aircraft on the ground will assist law enforcement officers, the governor’s office said.5:03 p.m.: Families of Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery issue joint statementThe families of Floyd, Breonna Taylor and Ahmaud Arbery — all of whom died after incidents with current and former law enforcement — are demanding change and calling for government action to address this “national crisis.”“We’re devastated about the senseless violence that has broken the hearts of our families,” the families said in a joint statement. “While we are grateful for the outpouring of love and support, it’s important that now – more than ever – we use our voices to enact change, demand accountability within our justice system and keep the legacies of Breonna, Ahmaud and George alive. This is a national crisis and our government needs to take immediate and widespread action to protect our black and brown communities.”The families have called for a congressional hearing and a national task force to create new bipartisan legislation that is aimed at ending racial violence and increasing police accountability.They will also present a case to United Nation Human Rights Committee for sweeping changes to the nation’s criminal justice system. A date for when they would be presenting their case was not provided.Taylor, a black woman, was a front-line worker who died after a police-involved shooting. Taylor and her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, were sleeping inside their Springfield Drive apartment on March 13 when officers with the Louisville Metro Police Department attempted to execute a “no-knock” search warrant.Three plainclothes officers opened Taylor’s front door and “blindly” opened fire into their apartment, according to a wrongful death lawsuit filed in April by Taylor’s mother, Tamika Palmer. Taylor was shot at least eight times and died.Arbery, a black man, was out for a jog when two white men saw him and set off to confront him, police said. The men, Travis McMichael and his father Gregory McMichael, a former police officer, were armed.A video shows Arbery and Travis McMichael tussling with the shotgun before three shots are fired. Arbery stumbled and fell to the ground, where he was pronounced dead.City leaders react to protestsThe mayor, police chief and city council vice president in Minneapolis emotionally addressed the violent protests that took place Wednesday night over the death of George Floyd, a black man who was seen pinned down in a video by a white police officer and later died.Mayor Jacob Frey, who at one point became choked up and tearful, said that the protests were “the result of so much built up anger and sadness.”“Anger and sadness that has been engrained in our black community, not just because of five minutes of horror, but 400 years,” Frey said at a press conference. “If you’re feeling that sadness and anger, it’s not only understandable, it’s right.”Police Chief Medaria Arradondo said he knew that there was a “deficit of hope” in the community and that his department has contributed to that deficit.He also said that the violence and destruction seen in Wednesday night’s protest was mostly caused by a “core group of people” who were not from Minnesota. He said that most of the community members who have been protesting since Floyd’s death Monday have been peaceful.Arradondo said he wanted to ensure that people could safely protest, but he said he could not allow for criminal acts.Wednesday night’s protest caused destruction and chaos in Minneapolis, including a deadly shooting, looting and multiple fires.The protests, which had been largely peaceful up until Wednesday night, were in wake of Floyd’s death after he was apprehended by Minneapolis police Monday. Disturbing video emerged on social media showing a police officer with his knee on the man’s neck as the man repeatedly yells out, “I can’t breathe.”“I can’t breathe, please, the knee in my neck,” the man said in a video showing a police officer pinning him to the ground. “I can’t move … my neck … I’m through, I’m through.”City Council Vice President Andrea Jenkins sang “Amazing Grace” at Thursday’s press conference before addressing the protests.Jenkins said she wanted to offer “amazing grace” and her condolences to the Floyd family.“We feel as if there was a knee on all of our collective necks, a knee that says black lives do not matter,” Jenkins, who is black, said. “I am part of this system to help to take that knee off of our necks.”Jenkins, Frey and Arradondo said they would be working with the community leaders. A “healing space” will be created at the 3rd Precinct in Minneapolis for residents to express their concerns and anger in a safe and humane way, Jenkins said.Overnight developmentsPolice said during the protests they responded to a call of a stabbing victim and found a man in grave condition near the protests. The man later died in the hospital and authorities learned he died from a gunshot wound, according to John Elder, the director of communication for Minneapolis police.One person was in custody after the shooting, police said. It was not immediately clear what led to the shooting, but the Minneapolis Star Tribune reported that the owner of a pawn shop opened fire on a man he believed was burglarizing his business and fatally shot him.Police said multiple businesses were looted during the protests and the city’s fire department said there were 30 intentional fires during the protests, including at least 16 structure fires.Massive flames were seen in the sky on videos that circulated throughout social media. As of Thursday afternoon, the fire department said crews were still extinguishing fires along East Lake Street.People were also throwing rocks at fire department vehicles responding to the scene, according to the fire department, which noted there were no firefighter injuries. Elder had said people were throwing rocks at firefighters.Civil Rights Attorney Ben Crump, who is representing Floyd’s family, wrote on Twitter the family thanked the protesters and wanted peace in Minneapolis, but “knows that Black people want peace in their souls — and until we get #JusticeForFloyd there will be no peace.”“We cannot sink to the level of our oppressors and endanger each other as we respond to the necessary urge to raise our voices in unison and in outrage,” Crump wrote Thursday morning. “Looting and violence distract from strength of our collective voice.”Please, Minneapolis, we cannot let tragedy beget more tragedy. The area along Lake has become unsafe. We are asking for your help in keeping the peace tonight. https://t.co/kRZuWGJY29— Mayor Jacob Frey (@MayorFrey) May 28, 2020The city requested assistance from the National Guard late Wednesday during the protests, according to ABC Saint Paul affiliate KSTP.The National Guard did not immediately respond to ABC News’ request for comment.“Tonight was a different night of protesting. Last night we had 8,000 protestors all peaceful. Tonight we did not have that,” Elder said.Elder said that there were no serious injuries to officers. He was not sure about the number of people arrested.The fire department said there were no civilian injuries from the fires.Gov. Tim Walz urged people to leave the area as the situation escalated.“The situation near Lake Street and Hiawatha in Minneapolis has evolved into an extremely dangerous situation. For everyone’s safety, please leave the area and allow firefighters and paramedics to get to the scene,” Walz wrote on Twitter.Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey also asked people to evacuate the area.“Please, Minneapolis, we cannot let tragedy beget more tragedy,” Frey wrote on Twitter.The Federal Bureau of Investigation is probing Floyd’s death. On Thursday, it was announced that the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Minnesota, the Department of Justice Civil Rights Division and the FBI’s Minneapolis Field Office were conducting a “robust” criminal investigation into his death.“The federal investigation will determine whether the actions by the involved former Minneapolis Police Department officers violated federal law. It is a violation of federal law for an individual acting under color of law to willfully deprive another person of any right protected by the Constitution or laws of the United States,” according to a joint statement from United States Attorney Erica MacDonald And FBI Special Agent In Charge Rainer Drolshagen.The officers involved in the incident were identified by police as Officer Derek Chauvin, Officer Thomas Lane, Officer Tou Thao and Officer J Alexander Kueng.All four officers were fired, according to Frey.“This is the right call,” the mayor said.The Minneapolis Police Department said Monday that officers were initially called to the scene “on a report of a forgery in progress” in a statement on their website.The statement added that officers were advised that the suspect “appeared to be under the influence” and that he “physically resisted officers.”He later “appeared to be suffering medical distress” and officers called an ambulance. He was transported to the Hennepin County Medical Center by ambulance, “where he died a short time later.”The police department said there were no weapons of any type used by anyone involved in the incident and no officers were injured.ABC News’ Catherine, Thorbecke and Will Gretsky contributed to this report. Our country allows for peaceful protests, but there is no reason for violence. I’ve seen our citizens unify & take care of one another through COVID19 & we can’t stop now. My deepest condolences to the family of George Floyd. As a nation, let’s focus on peace, prayers & healing.— Melania Trump (@FLOTUS) May 29, 2020 Evgen_Prozhyrko/iStockBy ELLA TORRES, WILLIAM MANSELL and IVAN PEREIRA, ABC News(MINNEAPOLIS) — The death of George Floyd, a black man who was seen pinned down in a video by a white police officer and later died, has caused outrage in the city of Minneapolis and across the United States. What started as mostly peaceful protests at the beginning of the week has turned into chaos.City leaders have pleaded with communities to voice their outrage in a lawful manner, but the widespread escalation of protests continued Friday night into Saturday.Murder and manslaughter charges have been filed against Derek Chauvin, one of the four officers at the scene who were all fired. The Department of Justice has said a full investigation of the incident is a “top priority.”Prosecutors said Chauvin, who was the officer seen in video pressing his knee against Floyd’s neck, had his knee on Floyd’s neck for 8 minutes and 46 seconds. Floyd was unresponsive for two minutes and 53 seconds of the encounter.This story will be updated as protests continue throughout the country. Please check back for updates. All times Eastern.10:58 a.m.: NYPD arrested over 200 during protestsDemonstrations throughout New York City Friday night resulted in the arrest of over 200, including one person in Brooklyn who had a loaded gun and a woman who was armed with a lit Molotov cocktail.More than 3000 demonstrators gathered in Foley Square and outside Barclays Center, police said.At the height of the protests, 37 patrol cars were vandalized with graffiti and broken windows, a police van was set on fire and a Molotov cocktail was thrown into an occupied police car — the officers inside were not hurt.There were more than a dozen officers injured, ranging from teeth knocked out to shoulder and head injuries.10:47 a.m.: 1,000 more National Guard service members activated in MinnesotaGovernor Tim Walz announced on Saturday morning that an additional thousand members of the National Guard will be deployed to “support civil authorities” during protests over the murder of George Floyd.“Our communities of color, our business community were out front fighting hand in hand to save businesses it took a decade to build,” said Walz during a press conference Saturday morning.Protests turned violent with fires set across the city, objects were thrown at the police and dozens have been arrested, officials said. Over 700 soldiers and air service members’ duty were activated overnight.What’s happening in the city is in “no way about the murder of George Floyd it’s about attacking civil society and installing fear,” said Walz.“We cannot as members of the community tolerate that,” said Minneapolis Public Safety Commissioner John Harrington at a press conference on Saturday.Officials said only about 20% of the rioters are Minnesota residents.Walz noted that practicing First Amendment rights should also involve practicing COVID-19 guidelines, but “the folks that are gathering out there … the masks were worn to disguise, to cause confusion and take advantage of that situation.”“The Minnesota National Guard is prepared to protect life, protect property and restore order,” according to a press release by the state’s National Guard.9:24 a.m.: FBI director calls George Floyd investigation “a top priority”ABC News has obtained a message to FBI employees sent by FBI Director Chris Wray, on Friday. In it, Wray said the investigation into the circumstances surrounding George Floyd’s death “is a top priority, and experienced prosecutors and FBI agents have been assigned to the matter.” He said the investigation “will determine whether the actions by the former Minneapolis police officers involved in this incident violated federal law.”He also wrote about how damaging the failure to honor the rights of citizens, particularly those in custody, can be.“Law enforcement officers have indispensable and often dangerous jobs, but that doesn’t diminish the crucial, overarching role we play in society – to protect and serve all citizens no matter their race, creed, orientation, or station in life. This, of course, includes those citizens who are in law enforcement custody,” Wray said.“When we fail to honor their rights, we not only tarnish the badge we wear, we completely erode the trust so many of us in law enforcement work so hard to build, particularly within minority communities. The events this past week in Minneapolis clearly illustrate just how quickly that trust can be lost,” the message stated.”8:41 a.m.: White House protesters would have been met with “most vicious dogs,” “most ominous weapons,” president tweetsPresident Trump fired off a series of tweets Saturday morning praising the Secret Service after protesters marched in front of the White House Friday night.“They were not only totally professional, but very cool,” he president tweeted. “They let the “protesters” scream & rant as much as they wanted…” he wrote.The president also wrote that if protestors had become “too frisky” or “got out of line,” “they would quickly come down on them,” he wrote. He also tweeted that if protesters had breached the White House fence, they would have been “greeted with the most vicious dogs, and most ominous weapons, I have ever seen.”He also took a jab at D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser. “On the bad side, the D.C. Mayor, @MurielBowser, who is always looking for money & help, wouldn’t let the D.C. Police get involved. “Not their job.” Nice!,” the president tweeted.8:19 a.m.: FBI issues statement on Oakland shootingThe Federal Bureau of Investigation issued a statement after one person was killed, and another injured in a shooting at that took place while protests were happening in Oakland, California. FBI San Francisco and Oakland police are investigating, but it is unknown yet if the shooting is connected to the protest.“FBI San Francisco and the Oakland Police Department are investigating a shooting that occurred at the Ronald V. Dellums Federal Building at 1301 Clay Street in Oakland, California.,” the statement read. “At approximately 9:45pm on Friday, May 29, 2020, a vehicle approached the building. An individual inside the vehicle began firing gunshots at contract security officers for the Federal Protective Service of the Department of Homeland Security. One officer was killed and another was injured,” according to the statement.“The FBI has deployed investigators and the Evidence Response Team to the crime scene. We will continue to work this investigation alongside the Oakland Police Department,” the statement continued.7:24 a.m.: Portland mayor declares State of EmergencyPortland Mayor Ted Wheeler announced Saturday morning that he’s declaring a State of Emergency in the city following the destructive unrest in the wake of the death of Floyd.He also announced the city has a curfew in effect until 6 a.m. local time Saturday and will begin again at 8 p.m.“Burning buildings with people inside, stealing from small and large businesses, threatening and harassing reporters. All in the middle of a pandemic where people have already lost everything,” Wheeler said in a statement Saturday. “This isn’t calling for meaningful change in our communities, this is disgusting.”Overnight the Portland Police Department declared the protest as a riot after “significant vandalism” was reported and a fire was set inside the city’s Justice Center. Police said there was also a shooting connected to the protest.Police said large sections of downtown were closed and that protesters should “disperse now or you will be subject to gas, projectiles, and other means necessary for dispersal.”5:43 a.m.: 1 dead in Detroit after person opens fire on protesters from vehicleOne person is dead in Detroit after a vehicle drove up on people protesting the death of Floyd and opened fire, according to authorities.A gray Dodge Durango pulled up and fired into the crowd, hitting a 19-year-old man who later died at the hospital, a Detroit Police Department spokesperson told ABC affiliate WXYZ.Detroit Police Chief James Craig said the violence and destruction overnight is not what the city of Detroit is about.“This does not represent the vast major of Detroiters who came here to make a statement,” Craig said during a press conference Friday night. “We support the message, but let’s do it peacefully.”He said many of the people taunting police officers and trying to incite violence have come from outside the city to sow chaos.“We know that the individuals from outside the city of Detroit who converged at the protest location don’t represent this city. They are not from this city,” Craig said. “Let’s peacefully protest, but outside of that, we’re not going to tolerate it. We’re not going to tolerate criminal acts.”4:26 a.m.: ‘Prudent’ to have Army units ready to deploy to Minnesota, governor saysAs fires raged and protests escalated even further throughout Minneapolis Saturday morning, local and state officials said getting the chaos under control will take a response never before seen in the state because “there’s simply more of them than us.”Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz said at least 1,000 additional Minnesota National Guard troops would be activated Saturday, and even then, that might not be enough. “You may have seen or heard that, this evening, the president directed the Pentagon to put units of United States Army on alert to possible operation in Minneapolis,” Maj. General John Jensen, Adjutant General of the Minnesota National Guard, said during a press conference Saturday. “While we were not consulted with, as it relates to that, I do believe it’s a prudent move to provide other options available for the governor, if the governor elects to use those resources.”Walz said it’s more complicated than just saying yes and deploying them now because the move to have federal troops patrolling in Minneapolis would be something never before seen in the state.“I spoke with President Trump the other night, I think it is prudent to have them ready for us to exhaust all resources that we need,” Walz said Saturday.Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey and Walz angrily took to the podium Saturday morning to ask those setting fires, attacking officers and looting businesses to stop.“We as a city can be so much better than this,” Frey said at the press conference Saturday. “There is no honor in burning down your city. There is no pride in looting local businesses that have become institutions of a neighborhood.”He said people, especially during a pandemic, are counting on grocery stores being open to get groceries, pharmacies to get needed medicine and banks to get money.“If you care about your community, you got to put this to an end; it needs to stop,” Frey said.Walz said the tragedy of Floyd’s death has morphed into “an unprecedented threat to our state,” where those causing destruction have no regard to property or life.Dozens of arrests were made on Friday, but an official total has not been released for the city. In one instance, shots were fired at law enforcement officers overnight.1:48 a.m.: Shots fired at law enforecment officers in MinnesotaShots were fired at law enforcement officers in Minneapolis early Saturday morning near the police department’s Fifth Precinct, according to Minnesota State Police. No officers are believed to have been hit.Following the shots, authorities warned residents to leave the area immediately or they would be arrested.The Minnesota Department of Public Safety said there are 350 officers and troopers in the area and “officers have arrested several people who ignored multiple dispersal orders.”Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz pleaded with protesters overnight to go home.“Minnesotans, please go home. It’s time to restore peace on our streets and in our neighborhoods,” Walz said in a statement. “The situation has become dangerous for Minnesotans and first responders.”Protesters took over the Minnesota Police Department’s Third Precinct building late Thursday night and ignited several fires.12:58 a.m.: LAPD asks residents to stay inside, businesses to close in downtown LAThe Los Angeles Police Department has asked downtown Los Angeles residents to stay inside and for all businesses to close due to the escalating protests in the city.“We have declared an unlawful assembly throughout downtown LA,” the department said in a statement Friday. The areas impacted are from the 10 Freeway to the 101 Highway and the 110 Freeway to Alameda.“This is being made following repeated acts of violence & property damage,” LAPD said. “Those on the street are to leave the area.”The department previously asked people to avoid downtown Los Angeles Friday, including nearby side streets and freeways.12:27 a.m.: Georgia issues State of Emergency, activates National GuardGeorgia Gov. Brian Kemp announced Friday night that he has issued a State of Emergency for Fulton County, where protests have turned violent in downtown Atlanta. He also announced that he’s activating 500 Georgia National Guard members.“At the request of Mayor @KeishaBottoms & in consultation with public safety & emergency preparedness officials, I have issued a State of Emergency for Fulton County to activate as many as 500 @GeorgiaGuard troops to protect people & property in Atlanta,” Kemp tweeted Friday.He said the troops would deploy immediately to help local and state law enforcement officials get control of the “unlawful activity” and to “restore peace.”“We will continue to make all state resources available to local leaders during this emergency situation,” he said.10:21 p.m.: Protests grow violent in BrooklynProtests over the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis erupted Friday night in Brooklyn where there have been at least 150 arrests, police sources told ABC News.The protest outside Barclays Center, the home of the NBA’s Brooklyn Nets, began peacefully, but drew what police sources described as professional agitators and turned ugly.There were more than 100 protesters detained outside the arena, mainly for throwing bottles and other disturbances.Protesters moved toward two police precincts in northern Brooklyn, the 88th Precinct in Fort Green and the 79th Precinct in Bedford-Stuyvesant. Along the way, a police van was set on fire and several cruisers were defaced with graffiti and broken windows.Some 500 demonstrators massed outside the 88 Precinct, where the van was set on fire. There were about 40 arrests there.Some demonstrators made it inside the 79 Precinct but were immediately arrestedThere have been about a dozen officers hurt so far in clashes with the protesters.9:21 p.m.: Atlanta sees violence spark outside CNNA protest in Atlanta grew violent this evening as a handful of protesters began smashing the doors to CNN Headquarters just after 8 p.m., according to Atlanta ABC affiliate WSB.After defacing the outside of the news network’s HQ and lighting a police car on fire, protesters began throwing objects at police who are inside the building’s lobby. Police were holding a line with shields.“Above everything else, I am a mother. I am a mother to four black children in America, one of whom is 18 years old,” Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms said at a press conference Friday night. “When i saw the murder of George Floyd I hurt like a mother would hurt. And yesterday when I heard about rumors of violent protests in Atlanta, I did what a mother would do, I called my son and said, ‘Where are you?’ I cannot protect you and black boys should not be out today.”“So you’re not gonna out-concern me or out-care about where we are in America,” she added. “I wear this each and every day and I pray over my children each and every day.”8:19 p.m.: Protest outside White House draws Secret ServiceA protest this evening in Lafayette Park just north of the White House has drawn the assistance of the Secret Service.Chants of “Let him breathe,” and, “don’t shoot,” could be heard.The U.S. Secret Service tweeted, “Secret Service personnel are currently assisting other law enforcement agencies during a demonstration in Lafayette Park. In the interest of public safety we encourage all to remain peaceful.”5:31 p.m.: Trump says he spoke to Floyd’s familyTrump told reporters at a business roundtable event Friday afternoon that he had spoken to the family of George Floyd, four days after his death.“I spoke to members of the family. Terrific people. And we’ll be reporting as time goes by. We think that we’ll also have to make the statement,” Trump said. “It’s very important, I believe, to the family, to everybody that the memory of George Floyd be a perfect memory — let it be a perfect memory.”The president also took the chance to emphasize peaceful protests, following controversial tweets earlier Friday in which he said “when the looting starts the shooting starts.”“It’s very important that we have peaceful protesters and support the rights for peaceful protesters. We can’t allow a situation like happened in Minneapolis to descend further into lawless anarchy and chaos, and we understand that very well,” the president said. “The looters should not be allowed to drown out the voices of so many peaceful protesters.”4:21 p.m.: Minneapolis, St. Paul enforce curfewGov. Tim Walz has said a curfew will be in place starting Friday night from 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. on Saturday in the entire Twin Cities region.No one will be allowed in the streets in public except for first responders and media. The curfew will also be in place Saturday night at 8 p.m. to Sunday 6 a.m.“It’s time to rebuild our community and that starts with safety in our streets,” Walz said in a statement. “Thousands of Minnesotans have expressed their grief and frustration in a peaceful manner. But the unlawful and dangerous actions of others, under the cover of darkness, has caused irreversible pain and damage to our community. This behavior has compromised the safety of bystanders, businesses, lawful demonstrators, and first responders. Now, we come together to restore the peace.”Officers will arrest those who do not comply, Walz said.Earlier, Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey had already issued a curfew order for the city for the same times.3:40 p.m.: Prosecutors reveal more details about charges on former officerThe Hennepin County Attorney released the full criminal complaint for former officer Derek Chauvin.The 44-year-old officer who was filmed putting his knee on Floyd’s neck faces a maximum sentence of 25 years in prison for third-degree murder charges and a maximum of 10 years behind bars for manslaughter charges.“Derek Michael Chauvin caused the death of George Floyd by his culpable negligence, creating an unreasonable risk and taking a chance of causing death or great bodily harm to George Floyd,” the complaint read.“The defendant had his knee on Mr. Floyd’s neck for 8 minutes and 46 seconds in total. Two minutes and 53 seconds of this was after Mr. Floyd was non-responsive,” according to the complaint.3:07 p.m.: Floyd’s family responds to former officer’s arrestWhile they said they were pleased with that he was apprehended, they said they expected first-degree murder charges.“We call on authorities to revise the charges to reflect the true culpability of this officer,” they said in a statement.The family also asked for the remaining three officers to be arrested and charged.2:28 p.m.: Trump tweets against lootingPresident Trump again doubled down on his earlier remarks about the ongoing protests.He tweeted again that “looting leads to shooting” citing “what just happened with 7 people shot.” In Minneapolis.“I don’t want this to happen, and that’s what the expression put out last night means,” he tweeted2:26 p.m.: Bill Barr releases statement on Floyd deathAttorney General Bill Barr said the Department of Justice and FBI are conducting an independent investigation to determine whether any federal civil rights laws were violated in George Floyd’s death.“The video images of the incident that ended with death of Mr. Floyd, while in custody of Minneapolis police officers, were harrowing to watch and deeply disturbing,” he said in a statement.Barr said the state’s charging decisions will be made first. 1:22 p.m.: Officer arrested in connection with Floyd’s deathDerek Chauvin, one of the four former officers fired for their involvement in George Floyd’s death, has been taken into custody by the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, according to Department of Public Safety Commissioner John Harrington.Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman is scheduled to give a news conference on developments in the case at 2 p.m.1:09 p.m.: Cops warn of anarchists infiltrating protestsABC News obtained a police bulletin issued to the Philadelphia Police Department and the Delaware Valley Intelligence Center that warned that anarchists and other groups are calling on their supporters to commit acts of violence against police officers in light of the protests in Minneapolis.The bulletin said there have been several social media posts calling for looting and civil disobedience as well as other acts of violence.“Domestic extremists, including anarchist extremists and other anti-government extremists, are using the unrest in Minneapolis to amplify and justify their calls for dismantling law enforcement agencies and carrying out attacks on law enforcement, government, and capitalist targets,” the bulletin said.The bulletin stressed that non-violent protests are legal and protected by the Constitution.“Anarchist extremists may be attracted to this call to action and engage in direct action against law enforcement property, such as buildings and vehicles, in order to draw attention to their cause,” it said.12:56 p.m.: Obama offers statement on George Floyd of our darkest chapters’Former President Barack Obama issued a statement on social media about Floyd’s death and the subsequent protests in Minneapolis.“This shouldn’t be ‘normal’ in 2020 America,” he wrote. “It can’t be ‘normal.’ If we want our children to grow up in a nation that lives up to its highest ideals, we can and must be better.”Obama said it is up to Minnesota officials to ensure that Floyd’s death is fully investigated and justice is ultimately done, however, he encouraged people “to work together to create a ‘new normal’ in which the legacy of bigotry and unequal treatment no longer infects our institutions or our hearts.”12:40 p.m.: Governor calls on order to be restored after ‘one of our darkest chapters’Gov. Tim Walz called the death of George Floyd and the subsequent protests that took place have been “one of our darkest chapters.” However, he said he refused to let those who caused destruction to Minneapolis “take away the attention of the stain that we need to be working on” and pleaded with the community to help restore order.Walz said that the “looting and recklessness” that occurred was not caused by those who wanted justice for Floyd.“We have to restore order to our society before we can start addressing the issues,” the governor said, later calling one of the issues “fundamental institutional racism.”He said that he would not “patronize” the black community as a white man, but asked the community to “help us use a humane way to get the streets back to a place where we can restore justice.”Walz started off his press conference by acknowledging generations of pain and anguish that communities of color in America have experienced. He said that those communities have not been truly heard, “much like we failed to hear George Floyd as he pleaded for his life, as the world watched, by the people sworn to protect him, his community, our state.”The commissioner for the state’s Department of Public Safety called Floyd’s death “murder.”“That’s what it looked like to me,” Commissioner John Harrington said. His comment marked the first time a member of law enforcement call Floyd’s death murder publicly.Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison began his remarks by quoting Martin Luther King Jr., saying “riot is the way that the unheart get heard.”He said King urged people not to dismiss non-peaceful protests or relegate it as criminality, but ask what was really going on there.Ellison said that protesters should not react to the National Guard in the way that may react to the Minneapolis Police Department. He noted they are two different agencies and “their job is trying to bring peace and calm back again.”Ellison said that although people continue to ask when justice will be served, he believes authorities understand that “the wheels of justice must turn swiftly.”He also said that while the investigation and criminal procedure for this case is important, it by no means addresses the root of these problems in this country.“I think we’re gonna do some real change. … We’re not just gonna fix the windows and sweep up the glass. We’re gonna fix the broken, shattered society that leaves so many behind.”11:10 a.m.: City is handling situation in ‘best way that we can,’ city council VP saysMinneapolis’ city council vice president said the government is still adjusting to the situation, but is handling it “in the best way that we can given all of the chaos, all of the unrest, all of the anger and pain in this community.”City Council Vice President Andrea Jenkins told ABC News’ Amy Robach on Friday that the city must take control of the situation and “restore some order back.”She also begged people not to gather in the streets, citing the pandemic and the damage that has been done in the last two nights. Jenkins said that the anger of the community has been expressed and she did not want further action to lead to injuries or loss of life.“We can’t allow this type of civic unrest to continue,” she said.Jenkins on Thursday called on city officials to declare racism a public health crisis.“By declaring racism a public health emergency it provides us the opportunity to name the virus that has infected our American institutions for centuries but in addition, it gives us the opportunities to … you can’t really begin to cure a disease until you know what that disease is,” she said. “It’s an infectious disease just like the coronavirus and it’s not just Minneapolis.”11 a.m.: Trump says National Guard is in MinneapolisPresident Donald Trump tweeted that the National Guard is now in Minneapolis.“They are in Minneapolis and fully prepared,” the president wrote. “George Floyd will not have died in vain. Respect his memory!!!”last_img read more

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Fascist-itis spreads to the continent

first_imgIn-party rows are contagious. Firstly, late last year:George Galloway and his supporters have split from Respect. After a week in which he has tried to pretend that the SWP and other socialists were leaving Respect he has announced a rival conference on the same day as the Respect national conference.Not long till it spread:Open rebellion is being threatened against the leader of the British National Party, Nick Griffin, from dozens of senior activists. The party has retaliated by expelling two senior members, who it accuses of plotting a coup. BNP officials Sadie Graham and Kenny Smith were kicked out after they were critical of Mr Griffin’s style.And now it’s In-fighting Über Alles:Police searched the headquarters of a German far-right party Thursday… The search of the National Democratic Party’s headquarters in Berlin’s Koepenick district was part of a probe by prosecutors in Muenster and police in western Germany against the party official, Erwin Kemna, Berlin police spokesman Uwe Kozelnik said. Kemna is being investigated on suspicion of breach of trust against the party.PS That SURVEY’s still runningCherwell 24 is not responsible for the content of external linkslast_img read more

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In Short

first_imgOnly 3% of 16-18-year-olds in Northern Ireland are interested in a career in the food and drink industry, according to research from food and drink sector skills council Improve. “The food and drink industry is currently worth £3bn a year to the NI economy and 6,000 new staff are required in the country by 2017,” said chief executive Jack Matthews. “This research shows the urgent need to alter perceptions and educate students about the benefits of a career in the sector.” Over 990 companies have signed up to exhibit at the IBA trade show, from 3 to 9 October 2009 in Düsseldorf. Greener, more efficient baking equipment and coffee are expected to be key focuses for the exhibition. == Asda’s fleet focus == == IBA exhibitors == == Heart health concern == Brits are still not doing enough to improve their heart health, says Datamonitor in a new report. In 2008, only a third of people in the UK told Datamonitor that they pay a ’high’ or ’very high’ amount of attention to their heart health. More than a quarter (29%) admitted that they only pay a ’low’ or ’very low’ amount of attention to the issue.center_img == Dearth of youngsters for food roles in NI == == Irwin’s rebrand boost == Asda is reducing its transport costs and aims to reduce its fleet’s emissions by 40%. New software will allow for more efficient route planning and use of its fleets and drivers. Northern Irish bakery Irwin’s is to launch a TV advert to mark the culmination of an 18-month rebranding exercise, representing an investment equivalent to £2m nationally. The 40-second advert will launch on screens across Northern Ireland this month.last_img read more

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Speech: Energy policy now and the direction it’s headed

first_img our energy price cap is in the final stages of development, and the Bill has received the support of Parliament. This will guarantee protection for 11 million households currently on the highest energy tariffs we have compensated our most energy-intensive users to help maintain competitiveness we have worked to reduce the impact of renewables on bills we have overseen the programme to deliver smart meters, with 12 million installed to date and we have supported energy efficiency – recognising that the cheapest unit of energy is always the one that you don’t use. Indeed, the Energy Company Obligation has been responsible for installing 2.2 million energy efficiency measures in 1.7 million households since 2013. I am delighted to be here this morning with such an illustrious line-up of speakers. The summit should be very enlightening, and this is a great time to have it.In just over 3 weeks, Secretary of State Greg Clark and I will be celebrating with colleagues in the department the second anniversary of BEIS. We are one of the youngest departments, with a remit cutting across government and the small task of reshaping the British economy.And when we were formed, it was clear that in delivering this ambition we would need to look to one sector in particular – the energy market. The sector is in the midst of a transformation as the top-down model focused on centralised generation gives way to a new and more dynamic market. From the rise of renewables and small-scale generation, to the digital revolution and our smart meters programme, energy policy is evolving rapidly and challenging historic assumptions.In recent years, there has been much focus on the energy “trilemma” of security of supply, cost, and decarbonisation. This has been portrayed as presenting trade-offs – and historically this has indeed often been the case.My argument today is threefold: the UK has led the world in the transformation of the energy sector over the last 40 years we stand on the cusp of the next transformational change in the energy sector, and that this can move us beyond the trilemma; and the UK is uniquely well-placed to lead that next transformation – and in doing so, we can deliver real economic benefit to the UK as part of our Industrial Strategy The UK has been at the forefront of both these key shifts over the last 40 years – first, to a market-based system, and second, to a system which helps us to resolve the trilemma – integrating large amounts of renewables, while maintaining security of supply and keeping costs down.But our work to date is not enough. We now need to place ourselves at the front of the pack for the next big transition. That is the challenge set by our reforming Secretary of State, Greg Clark.And now is the time to do so. The Climate Change Act has a baseline of 1990, and a target date of 2050 to have reduced our emissions by 80%. We are approaching halfway through that timeline. According to the independent Committee for Climate Change, last year we had reduced our emissions by 42%, more than halfway to that 80% goal.As world leaders in innovation in technology, systems and market design, with a historic and profound influence on the energy sector, we must challenge ourselves to look ahead to the next exciting stage in the long journey.We must discern and respond to the changes to the system arising from falling technology costs, increasingly distributed energy sources and the rise of the smart digital energy system. And we must deliver all this while ensuring our costs are as low as possible, ensuring that we are competitive in global markets as we leave the European Union.That is why, last year, the government asked Professor Dieter Helm to carry out his review of the cost of energy. Dieter’s report set out his view that the complexity of the system has added unnecessary costs, and that significant change is needed to exploit the benefits of future advances in technology. Following our call for evidence, we are carefully considering Dieter’s recommendations and their implications for our energy strategy.Our approach will be aligned with the key technological changes which can help to cut costs, cut carbon, and maintain security of supplies – and drive towards a future where the three corners of the trilemma work in concert, not opposition.For example, decarbonisation offers us another advantage besides emissions reduction; it provides an opportunity to ensure we have a diverse and resilient energy mix, which is not too dependent on any single source. And our approach in future must foster that optionality, while ensuring that the technologies we support meet the three criteria set out by Energy Minister Claire Perry: The third of these criteria brings me to the Industrial Strategy. Too often in the past the links between energy policy and economic policy have been too weak. The creation of BEIS offers a unique opportunity to bring those objectives together. What we do to secure our energy policy objectives should be delivering our Industrial Strategy ambitions – the world’s most innovative economy, good jobs and greater earning power for all, modern infrastructure, the best place to start and grow a business.We know that the economic opportunities for the UK are there to be seized. Our record is strong.Since 1990, we have reduced our emissions by over 40 percent while growing the economy by over two thirds – the best performance in the G7 on a per person basis. The UK’s clean economy already supports almost 400,000 jobs and by one estimate, could grow at 4 times the rate of GDP.And my department, working with people across the sector, have helped to support supply chain investment in offshore wind and nuclear; innovative approaches in retail and supply; investments in battery innovation and storage technologies; and development of a potentially world-leading capability in smart systems.But this is only the beginning. The future opportunities are huge – out of the world’s projected $10 trillion investment in power generation over the next twenty years, over 85% is expected to be in zero-carbon sources.Electric vehicles are projected to make up over half of global car sales by 2040, and in 2017, one in eight electric cars sold in Europe was made in the UK. By 2060, the global floor area in buildings is expected to double, with an estimated investment potential of $16 trillion in green buildings across 21 emerging markets.Of course we still need to make big changes – not least to our heating systems, which are currently still heavily dependent on hydrocarbons.But we know that we should not be intimidated by the challenge, as we remember the UK’s proud history of being ahead of the curve in the energy sphere.That is why Clean Growth is one of our Industrial Strategy Grand Challenges – helping to ensure that we maximise the economic benefits to the UK of the low-carbon transition.Through the Industrial Strategy and Clean Growth Strategy, we are confident we can move towards an economy where low-carbon is synonymous with low-cost. And by harnessing new technologies, we can develop solutions that help meet future demand while keeping down costs.The role of BEIS is as an agent for this change, creating markets which drive innovation and competition, supporting the conditions for growth, and keeping costs down for consumers. And we want to work with you, in industry, in research, in the investor community and elsewhere in government, to deliver that. can we see the potential for significant cost reduction? does this have the potential to deliver large-scale carbon emission reduction? and is this an area where the UK can benefit from a comparative advantage, leading to increased growth and exports? The UK has been at the cutting edge of innovation in energy for the last 40 years. Through the 20th century, the term “energy markets” was a misnomer – with a consensus around centrally planned systems and firm state control.Britain was at the forefront of the transition to a market-based approach. Nigel Lawson’s landmark speech in 1982 summarised the change: as he said, “our task is to set a framework which will ensure that the market operates with a minimum of distortion and energy is produced and consumed efficiently”.That approach presaged the privatisation of the market – unleashing a wave of competition and market innovation and replicated in markets across the world. And the benefits of that privatisation are clear.Network costs have fallen 17% since privatisation at the same time as improving system reliability; and we now have over 65 suppliers in the retail market, with the number of consumers switching suppliers hitting record highs. From 1990 to 2005, generation grew from 298 to 377 terawatt hours and domestic retail energy prices fell roughly 45% in real terms over the same period.With privatisation came regulation; and the UK led again with the introduction of RPI-X for natural monopoly regulation and liberalisation for potentially competitive parts of the market. This has heavily and positively influenced the design of the EU’s energy market framework.The second major wave of change has been more recent – the transition to a secure system which is also low-carbon. Again, the UK has been among the world leaders.The landmark Climate Change Act made us the first country in the world to set a long-term, statutory emissions reduction target.Electricity market reform delivered new instruments to ensure security of supply, and to slash the costs of decarbonisation – recognising the need for an active role for government, but using competition to minimise costs.And our approach to new nuclear has enabled us to contract for the first new nuclear plant in a generation, applying innovative thinking to the financial and operating model, and to confirm that we will enter into negotiations in relation to the proposed Wylfa project.It is worth remembering that many argued that we did not need a capacity market, and that renewable generation could not compete for support. But what we have seen is many other countries following our lead on security of supply, and the costs of offshore wind cut to under £60 per megawatt hour in the most recent auction – unimaginable a few short years ago.The UK also led the way in the introduction of emissions trading, introducing an emissions trading scheme three years before the EU ETS. Then, in 2013, we delivered a carbon price floor programme to drive low-carbon investment.These measures have enabled us to lead the world in taking coal off the system, without imperilling our security of supply – a transition we have managed smoothly, without any major supply interruptions.Already this year we have had more coal-free hours in 2018 than in the whole of 2017 – an enormous achievement, and totemic of the profound change in our power sector in recent years.But BEIS recognises the need for a relentless focus on keeping costs down for consumers, and, as DECC before it, has taken multiple steps to deliver that:last_img read more

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Press release: HS2 set to boost opportunities for businesses in Scotland

first_img Contact form https://www.hs2.org.uk… Along with our partner government agencies, we are keen to support and encourage companies to access the £600 billion UK pipeline for infrastructure spend over the next 10 years. HS2 is by far the largest of these projects, with UK Government committed spend of £55.7 billion. Clearly there is a keen interest in Scotland with over 160 delegates from over 100 companies coming to Glasgow today to meet with HS2 and we encourage all companies interested to engage with us, access support and be competition ready. The press and media enquiries line is for accredited journalists only Scottish Enterprise Portfolio Director for High Value Manufacturing, Julia Brown, said: The size of the HS2 project means there will be thousands of opportunities within the HS2 supply chain, across many business sectors, requiring a wide range of capabilities, over a number of years that will be suitable for suppliers of all types and sizes. It is expected that every 10 direct tier one major works contracts will result in over 10,000 indirect supply chain opportunities. There are 2,000 companies already supporting the project, with over 70% of these SMEs.Last year, HS2 Ltd launched its Skills, Education and Employment Strategy, setting out interventions that will ensure that the UK not only has the skills to deliver the HS2 project, but to become a world leader in high speed rail. At peak construction, 30,000 jobs will be supported by the project and 2,000 apprentices will be on offer.HS2 trains will also be arriving in Scotland from 2026, bringing journey times from London to Glasgow to below 4 hours for the first time. When the full Y network opens in 2033, journey times between London and Edinburgh and London and Glasgow will fall to 3 hours 40 minutes, and connections with Birmingham and the North West of England will be improved.Work is well underway on HS2, with 62 live sites, servicing over 250 work locations across Phase One. There is a huge amount of work going on including land clearance, habitat creation, tree planting, demolitions, archaeology, road improvement works, utility diversions and compound creation, to prepare for the new railway.center_img The HS2 project is a once in a lifetime opportunity for firms from Scotland to get involved and help deliver Britain’s new high speed railway. The scale and longevity of the project means that there will be thousands of opportunities for businesses available. We’re looking for everything from engineering to catering services, designers to ecologists, and concrete to electronic components. It is not just about track and trains. I encourage any business interested in working on HS2 to look out for the opportunities on offer. Press and media enquiries Businesses in Scotland are already benefiting from contracts with HS2, and more are being encouraged to get on board with the project, creating jobs and skills opportunities for people in Scotland.Over 160 business representatives from firms throughout Scotland attended an event in Glasgow, hosted by Scottish Enterprise, to find out more about the work packages available and how they can position themselves to be part of the team building the UK’s new high speed rail line.Speaking to business leaders in Glasgow, Mark said:last_img read more

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The nature of reality

first_imgA panel discussion with photographer/artist/essayist Allan Sekula quickly turned into a discourse on the nature of reality, a direction that fazed neither those presenting the conversation nor those listening in Emerson Hall.Indeed, Sekula, who explores questions of capitalism, globalization, and social reality in a variety of media, characterized his approach as “realism in a time of lies” during a conversation April 28 with Homi Bhabha, the Anne F. Rothenberg Professor of the Humanities and director of the Humanities Center, and Benjamin Buchloh, the Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Modern Art.As part of “The Church of What’s Happening Now” event sponsored by the Humanities Center and the Harvard Art Museum, Sekula showed clips from a film-in-process and discussed his seminal works such as “Fish Story,” an exhibit and book exploring maritime issues, “Waiting for Tear Gas,” about the Seattle protests against the World Trade Organization, and “This Ain’t China,” a riff on factory work.Sekula’s work “resists nostalgia and heroism in an attempt to portray the quotidian horror of what it takes simply to survive,” Bhabha said.In his remarks, Sekula noted with horrified glee the President George W. Bush-era attacks on the so-called “reality-based community.” He asked, “What does it mean that we live in a culture that thinks it can bomb peasants into modernity?”Reality is even an issue within art world. “One of the problems of the latest in modernism is the suppression of realism,” Sekula said. “And yet there is another reading of modernism which allows us to see realism as a kind of marginalized and potentially subversive strand within modernism.”Now based at the California Institute of the Arts, Sekula, the recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship, began his artistic career within the conceptual art movement, which is now much derided.“As much as you attack, contest, criticize, and denigrate that legacy, I think it is still interesting for us to think about that exchange moment from which you emerged in the late 1970s,” Buchloh said. Sekula, he noted, was among those who “redefined the history of photography in terms of our thinking on photographic representation.”Buchloh particularly cited the artistic performance by Sekula in which he threw stolen raw steaks onto a busy California freeway. Also, Bhabha told Sekula that raw meat or rawness “seems to be a real motif of your work.”Sekula seemed to regard the meat incident as an act of juvenile exuberance, an effort to create a “profane act.” But, he added, he recently saw the movie “The Wrestler,” and was struck with how the broken-down fighter played by Mickey Rourke said, “I’m just a used-up hunk of meat. The film is really about that.”Seeing in the audience Robin Kelsey, the Shirley Carter Burden Professor of Photography and director of graduate studies in the History of Art and Architecture Department, Bhabha invited him onto the stage. Kelsey asked Sekula why he moved away from still photography into filmmaking.Sekula said that he had to switch to film to capture what he was witnessing. He found that he could not, for example, capture the frenetic nature of a particular Japanese fish market with still photos. “I borrowed a camera and read the manual at 1 in the morning, and I started filming at 3 in the morning.”An audience member, Coco Segaller, a student at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, asked Sekula to distinguish reality from among his work’s social, artistic, and political narratives.Sekula, only half joking, responded, “You want an objective definition of reality?”Segaller tried again: “What is the reality in the realm of conflicting narratives?”“One way to answer is to say what the lies are,” Sekula said. “You can only make your own story. You can only make your own external truth.”But, he added, turning serious, “The biggest lie is the lie of marketization — that everything can be marketized.”Bhabha singled out Sekula’s 2006 movie “A Short Film for Laos,” in which “very simple acts of survival, even transitional moments, are always so central.” Sekula’s work can be interpreted as metaphor on many levels, “yet somehow when you talk, people feel that it is much more object-driven or content-driven,” Bhabha said.“Well, you should never trust what an artist says,” Sekula replied, to great laughter.last_img read more

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When a calorie is not just a calorie

first_imgA new study published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) challenges the notion that “a calorie is a calorie.”The study, led by Harvard Medical School (HMS) Assistant Professor of Pediatrics Cara Ebbeling and Professor of Pediatrics David Ludwig, finds diets that reduce the surge in blood sugar after a meal — either low-glycemic index or very-low carbohydrate — may be preferable to a low-fat diet for those trying to achieve lasting weight loss. Furthermore, the study finds that the low-glycemic index diet had similar metabolic benefits to the very low-carb diet without negative effects of stress and inflammation as seen by participants consuming the very low-carb diet.The research was conducted at the New Balance Foundation Obesity Prevention Center at Harvard-affiliated Boston Children’s Hospital, where Ludwig is director and Ebbeling is associate director.Weight re-gain is often attributed to a decline in motivation or adherence to diet and exercise, but biology also plays an important role. After weight loss, the rate at which people burn calories (known as energy expenditure) decreases, reflecting slower metabolism. Lower energy expenditure adds to the difficulty of weight maintenance and helps explain why people tend to re-gain lost weight.Prior research by Ebbeling and Ludwig has shown the advantages of a low-glycemic load diet for weight loss and diabetes prevention, but the effects of these diets during weight loss maintenance has not been well studied. Research shows that only one in six overweight people will maintain even 10 percent of their weight loss over the long term.The study suggests that a low-glycemic load diet is more effective than conventional approaches at burning calories (and keeping energy expenditure) at a higher rate after weight loss. “We’ve found that, contrary to nutritional dogma, all calories are not created equal,” says Ludwig, who is also director of the Optimal Weight for Life Clinic at Boston Children’s Hospital. “Total calories burned plummeted by 300 calories on the low-fat diet compared to the low-carbohydrate diet, which would equal the number of calories typically burned in an hour of moderate-intensity physical activity,” he says.Each of the study’s 21 adult participants (ages 18-40) first had to lose 10 to 15 percent of their body weight, and after weight stabilization, completed all three of the following diets in random order, each for four weeks at a time. The randomized crossover design allowed for rigorous observation of how each diet affected all participants, regardless of the order in which they were consumed:The low-fat diet, which reduces dietary fat and emphasizes whole grain products and a variety of fruits and vegetables, was based on 60 percent of daily calories from carbohydrates, 20 percent from fat, and 20 percent from protein.The low-glycemic index diet, made up of minimally processed grains, vegetables, healthy fats, legumes and fruits, gathered 40 percent of daily calories from carbohydrates, 40 percent from fat, and 20 percent from protein. Low-glycemic index carbohydrates digest slowly, helping to keep blood sugar and hormones stable after the meal.The low-carbohydrate diet, modeled after the Atkins diet, was based on 10 percent of daily calories from carbohydrates, 60 percent from fat, and 30 percent from protein.The study used state-of-the-art methods, such as stable isotopes to measure participants’ total energy expenditure, as they followed each diet.Each of the three diets fell within the normal healthy range of 10 to 35 percent of daily calories from protein. The very-low-carbohydrate diet produced the greatest improvements in metabolism, but with an important caveat: This diet increased participants’ cortisol levels, which can lead to insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. The very-low-carbohydrate diet also raised C-reactive protein levels, which may also increase risk of cardiovascular disease.Though a low-fat diet is traditionally recommended by the U.S. government and American Heart Association, it caused the greatest decrease in energy expenditure, an unhealthy lipid pattern, and insulin resistance.“In addition to the benefits noted in this study, we believe that low-glycemic-index diets are easier to stick to on a day-to-day basis, compared to low-carb and low-fat diets, which many people find limiting,” says Ebbeling. “Unlike low-fat and very-low-carbohydrate diets, a low-glycemic-index diet doesn’t eliminate entire classes of food, likely making it easier to follow and more sustainable.”Other co-authors of the study include Henry Feldman and Erica Garcia-Lago from Boston Children’s Hospital, Janis Swain from Brigham and Women’s Hospital, William Wong from Baylor College of Medicine, and David Hachey from Vanderbilt University. The study was funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, the National Center for Research Resources, the National Institutes of Health, and the New Balance Foundation.Tomatoes and a variety of vegetables make up the greatest selection on the low-glycemic shopping list. Photo by Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographerlast_img read more

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Upcoming VTPA Meeting

first_imgThe Vermont Tax Practitioners Association (VTPA) will hold its next regular meeting on Tuesday, December 10th from 9:30 a.m. until 2:30 p.m. at the Best Western Hotel (formerly the Holiday Inn) just off Exit 10 of I-89 in Waterbury, Vt.The morning session will be presented by a representative of the Internal Revenue Service and will examine new tax changes for the upcoming tax season.The afternoon session will be by the Vermont Department of Taxes and will also preview the 2002 tax year, with a special emphasis on the new tax forms and changes to the Act 60 process.The meeting is free for VTPA members who have paid their 2002 dues. Annual VTPA membership dues are $50 payable in advance or at the meeting. Prospective members or other interested persons may attend one introductory meeting without charge. Lunch is an additional $10 charge for all attending. For more membership information call Rick Kane at (802) 463-1503.The Vermont Tax Practitioners Association is a professional organization formed in 1975 to advance the education of all those interested in the field of taxation. Members meet five times a year for workshops and networking.last_img read more

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New Zealand firms join forces in country’s largest corporate renewable energy supply deal

first_imgNew Zealand firms join forces in country’s largest corporate renewable energy supply deal FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Renew Economy:A group of New Zealand’s largest commercial and industrial energy users, including dairy giant Fonterra, has joined forces to procure what could be thousands of gigawatt-hours a year of renewable electricity via one of the nation’s first and biggest corporate power purchase agreements.The Renewable Electricity Generation Project, which is being coordinated by the Major Electricity Users Group (MEUG), will seek to buy electricity from a range of new projects, potentially including geothermal, wind, and solar farms.The companies making up the joint venture include dairy co-op Fonterra, Japan-owned pulp and paper manufacturer Oji Fibre Solutions, Japan-owned forestry and timber company Pan Pac Forest Products, and metals industry companies New Zealand Steel and Pacific Steel.All told, the businesses represent a combined annual electricity demand of around 2,000GWh, or 2 terawatt-hours (TWh), and the PPA will seek to meet an unspecified proportion of this load.John Harbord, the chair of MUEG, said the group went to market, on Monday, with a request for proposals to be submitted over the coming six weeks. Responses are due by close of business, Monday, August 31.Harbord said the main driver behind the joint PPA was for the businesses to use their collective clout to lower NZ carbon emissions to a degree they couldn’t achieve as individual companies.[Sophie Vorrath]More: NZ biggest corporate PPA seeks up to 2,000GWh a year of new renewableslast_img read more

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Northwell Health at Jones Beach Theater Summer 2017 Concert Lineup

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The Northwell Health at Jones Beach Theater summer concert series kicks off after the return of beach season Memorial Day weekend.Check out what acts are playing the Jones Beach amphitheater this summer! This list will be updated as new concert dates are announced.KTUphoria 2017Kicking off the Jones Beach summer concert series is this year’s pop fest line-up featuring the Backstreet Boys, Fifth Harmony, Nicky Jam, Jason Derulo, Shaggy, Daya, Craig David, Starley and Miley Cyrus. $24-$230. 7 p.m. June 3.Jason AldeanThe country rocker is back again on his They Don’t Know Tour with supporting acts Chris Young, Kane Brown and Dee Jay Silver. $46-$400. 7:30 p.m. June 4. Dave Matthews and Tim ReynoldsSince Dave Matthews Band is not touring this summer, the two musicians and longtime friends are instead taking the opportunity to play a rare series of stripped-down, acoustic dates together. $85-$425. 7:30 p.m. June 6.Deftones and Rise AgainstThe Grammy-winning alt-rockers join forces with the punk rock stalwarts and opening act Thrice. $15-$173. 6:30 p.m. June 13.TrainThe alt-rockers best known for their hits “Hey, Soul Sister,” “Drops of Jupiter” and “Drive By” are touring to promote their tenth studio album, a girl a bottle a boat. $29-$333. 7 p.m. June 14. Florida Georgia LineThe brothers who make up Florida Georgia Line, Brian Kelley and Tyler Hubbard, will perform their hit single, “Cruise,” which sold 10 million copies, making FGL the first-ever country band to receive RIAA’s Diamond certification. $31-$559. 7 p.m. June 15. BLI Summer JamThe line-up includes Flo Rida, DNCE, Martin Garrix, Sean Paul, Jason Derulo, Sabrina Carpenter, James Arthur, Noah Cyrus, Nick Tangorra and more. $24-$272. 5 p.m. June 16.Steve Miller BandMIller is known for chart-topping hits “Fly Like An Eagle,” “Rock’n Me,” “Take the Money and Run,” “Jet Airliner,” “Abracadabra” and “Jungle Love,” among many others, and is living testament to rock’s continued power and relevance. Also performing is Peter Frampton, famous for his hugely selling double-live album of 1976, and his chops as a rock-n-roll hero from Humble Pie. $26-$230. 7:30 p.m. June 17.Dierks BentleyThis Arizona-born country crooner returns to LI on the What The Hell World Tour. Opening acts include Cole Swindell and Jon Pardi. $35-$355. 7 p.m. June 23.Third Eye BlindIn recognition to their fans for 20 years down, Third Eye Blind will, for the first time in their storied history, play their debut album, considered one of the great rock records of all time, in its entirety, as part of a night of music including their latest, We Are Drugs. With opening act Silversun Pickups and Ocean Park Standoff. $24-$184. 7 p.m. June 24.RammsteinThis German industrial band best known for their hit single “Du Hast” will wow fans with their over-the-top pyrotechnics and stage antics. $145-$1,055. 8 p.m. June 25.NicklebackCanadian pop rockers will play their hits “Photograph”, “Far Away” and “Rockstar” on the Feed The Machine Tour with opening acts Daughtry and Shaman’s Harvest. $22-$194. 6 p.m. July 1. James TaylorOne of the best-selling musicians of all time, Taylor will play his classics, including “How Sweet It Is (To Be Loved By You),” “You’ve Got A Friend” and “Fire and Rain.” $36-$360. 7:30 p.m. July 7.Vans Warped TourThe nation’s longest running annual music festival returns with its traveling freak show of pop-punk artists. This year, the lineup consists of a good mix of punk, metal and pop artists, including: The Acacia Strain, The Adolescents, After The Burial, The Alarm, Alestorm, American Authors, Andy Black, Anti-Flag and more. $45. 11 a.m. July 8.The Moody BluesThe band will reflect back on five decades of some of the most well beloved music in pop culture history this summer, when they perform live onstage, for the first-time ever, Days of Future Passed, their epic album that marked the first time a rock band had fused their sound with a symphony orchestra. $25-$193. 8 p.m. July 12.Lady AntebellumThis Tennessee-based country band returns to LI to play their hits, such as “Need to Know” and “Just a Kiss,” on The You Look Good Tour with opening acts Kelsea Ballerini and Brett Young. $32.75-$66.25. 7:30 p.m. July 14.Rod StewartTwo of music’s most acclaimed artists and powerhouse live performers will tour together this summer when Rod Stewart is joined by special guest Cyndi Lauper. Stewart and Lauper have been awarded nearly every industry award and honor for their incomparable catalog of hits and activism. $30-$420. 7:30 p.m. July 18. IncubusConsidered one of the most popular alternative-metal bands of all time, Incubus pride themselves on evolving their music throughout their storied career. Opening the show is Jimmy Eat World and Judah & The Lion. $25-$237. 6:45 p.m. July 19.ForeignerThe band best known for hits “Cold as Ice,” “Juke Box Hero” and “I Wanna Know What Love Is” joins forces with Rock ‘n’ Roll Hall of Famers Cheap Trick and Jason Bonham’s Led Zeppelin Experience. $25-$221. 7 p.m. July 20.Chris StapletonThis Tennessee-based country crooner performs hit hits, such as “Never Wanted Nothing More” with opening acts Anderson East and Brent Cobb. $30-$250. 7 p.m. July 21.MuseThe British prog-rockers with a cult following plays the beach with supporting acts Thirty Seconds to Mars and PVRIS. $59-$415. 7 p.m. July 22.BostonThe classic rock band will play their hits, “More Than a Feeling”, “Peace of Mind” and “Foreplay/Long Time” on their The Hyper Space Tour with Joan Jett & The Blackhearts. $22-$216. 7:30 p.m. July 23.Brantley GilbertThe southern rocker is touring to promote his recently released album, The Devil Don’t Sleep, with supporting acts Tyler Farr and Luke Combs. $25-$179. 7 p.m. July 27.ChicagoThe self-described rock band with horns performs with the Doobie Brothers. $25-$293. 7:30 p.m. July 28.One RepublicThis Colorado-based pop rock band known for their breakout hit “Apologize” tours with opening acts Fitz & The Tantrums and James Arthur. $25-$275. 7 p.m. July 29.Kings of LeonThe iconic alt-rockers are touring fresh off a chart-topping radio hit with supporting acts Nathaniel Rateliff and the Night Sweats. $32-$348. 7 p.m. Aug. 1. Brad PaisleyPossibly one of the most recognizable modern country singers, Brad Paisley has sold more than 12 million albums, won three Grammy Awards, 14 CMA Awards and has become a registered member of the Grand Ole Opry. Opening acts include Dustin Lynch, Chase Bryant and Lindsay Ell. $30-$290. 7 p.m. Aug. 3.Goo Goo DollsThe Goo Goo Dolls, best known for the emotional ’98 hit song “Iris,” return to LI on their Long Way Home Summer Tour with Phillip Phillips. $22-$234. 8 p.m. Aug. 13.Jimmy BuffettThe musician best known for his paradise-themed songs is a perfect performer for a summer concert at Jones Beach. Perhaps what’s more popular than seeing the godliness of Jimmy Buffet & The Coral Reefers themselves is the pre-show Parrothead tailgate, where Buffet fans unite and celebrate the season, which fans spend months preparing in advance. $56-$498. 7 p.m. Aug. 16.United We Rock TourIt’s a trifecta of ‘70s and ‘80s rock masters with Styx, REO Speedwagon and Eagles’ guitarist Don Felder. $20-$252. 7 p.m. Aug. 16.Billboard’s 2017 Hot 100 Music FestivalGrammy Award nominated and multi-platinum selling artists, Major Lazer, Big Sean and Zedd will headline the festival, which returns with another epically diverse line-up that includes more than 30 of today’s biggest music stars. Tickets go on sale May 22. Concert Aug. 19-20.John MayerThis Connecticut-born acoustic pop rock crooner is touring to promote his latest album, The Search for Everything. $36-$406. 7 p.m. Aug. 23.Lynyrd Skynyrd & Hank Williams Jr.Lynyrd Skynyrd’s will be sure to play their greatest hits, including “Free Bird” and “Sweet Home Alabama.” $26-$188. 7 p.m. Aug. 25.Deep Purple & Alice CooperThe English hard rock legends perform with The Godfather of Shock Rock and supporting act The Edge Water Band. 6:30 p.m. Aug. 26.Luke BryanThis Georgia-based country rocker is coming to town on his Huntin’, Fishin’ and Lovin’ Every Day Tour. $67.25-$83.25. 7 p.m. Aug. 27.Matchbox 20 & Counting CrowsThese two alt-rock superstars join forces on their Brief History of Everything Tour. $29-$225. 6:45 p.m. Aug. 31.Willie NelsonAdditional tour dates were added to the Outlaw Music Festival Tour by popular demand. Also performing will be The Avett Brothers, Sheryl Crow, Margo Price, Lukas Nelson & Promise Of The Real, Particle Kid and more. Tickets go on sale May 22. Show Sept. 9. Sublime with Rome and The OffspringEric Wilson, the original bassist for Sublime, collaborates with singer and guitarist Rome Ramirez to perform the band’s ska hits—”What I Got,” “Santeria” and “Doin’ Time,” to name a few—in place of the late lead singer, Bradley Nowell, who died of a heroin overdose two decades at age 28. $25-$189. 7 p.m. Sept. 16.Sammy Hagar & The CircleSammy Hagar and The Circle, the critically-acclaimed supergroup featuring Michael Anthony, Jason Bonham and Vic Johnson, are touring with opening act Collective Soul. $25-$241. 7 p.m. Sept. 23.Laid Back FestivalPresented in the spirit of co-founder Gregg Allman, the all-star line-up includes Jackson Browne, Steve Winwood, Little Steven and The Disciples of Soul, Peter Wolf and more. Pre-sale begins June 13, general sale opens June 16. Concert Sept. 24.Northwell Health at Jones Beach Theater is located at the intersection of Ocean Parkway and Wantagh State Parkway in Jones Beach State Park in Wantagh. For more information on purchasing tickets, visit LiveNation.com or Ticketmaster.comlast_img read more