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Indiana Corn and Soybean Crop Conditions Fall

first_img Facebook Twitter Home Indiana Agriculture News Indiana Corn and Soybean Crop Conditions Fall Indiana Corn and Soybean Crop Conditions Fall Scattered rains brought relief to some fields last week while others continued to suffer, according to Greg Matli, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Indiana Field Office. Soil moisture levels improved statewide last week, though not all farms received rainfall.The Indiana corn crop is rated 32% good to excellent, a 1% drop from a week ago. The Indiana soybean crop is also down 1% from a week ago at 33% good to excellent. Nationally, corn is rated 56% good to excellent down 1% from last week. Soybeans are rated 53% good to excellent, down 1% as well.The average temperature for the week was 74.7 degrees Fahrenheit, 1.9 degrees above normal for Indiana. The amount of rainfall varied from none to 3.51 inches over the week. The statewide average precipitation was 1 inch. There were 5.9 days suitable for fieldwork for the week ending August 18.Above average temperatures coupled with sporadic and, in some areas, non-existent rainfall caused farmers to continue to worry about adequate precipitation during grain fill. In those areas that received rainfall, crop conditions remained steady or slightly improved while areas receiving little to no rainfall saw conditions deteriorate. The 2019 Indiana corn and soybean crops were in much worse shape than they were during the same time in 2018. Growers continued to hope for a late killing frost.Livestock producers in areas that were devoid of rainfall began to supplemental feed because pastures were no longer adequate for the nutrition needs of their livestock. Facebook Twitter SHARE By USDA Communications – Aug 19, 2019 SHARE Previous articleNearly 17,000 Enrolled in New Dairy Margin Coverage ProgramNext articleFSA Still on Track for MFP2.0 Payments to Arrive This Week or Next USDA Communicationslast_img read more

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Quebec City police threaten to seize video recordings from three local television stations

first_img CanadaAmericas Organisation News Forum on Information and Democracy 250 recommendations on how to stop “infodemics” RSF_en November 11, 2020 Find out more News Help by sharing this information On eve of the G20 Riyadh summit, RSF calls for public support to secure the release of jailed journalists in Saudi Arabia Receive email alerts Newscenter_img Reporters Without Borders is quite troubled that Quebec City police may be going to the offices of the television stations TQS, TVA and Radio-Canada to seize video recordings as part of a police investigation.Robert Menard, Secretary General of Reporters Without Borders, warns about “the risks” this can represent for journalists “to be seen as involuntary or voluntary police informants. If sources are not respected, nobody will be willing to share information with journalists. Journalism, and particularly investigative journalism, so precious for democracy, could be seriously affected.”The organization is asking the Quebec Superior Court to cancel the search warrants that were given to Quebec City police.On June 4, 2003, a Quebec Court judge signed the search warrants giving Quebec City police the right to search the offices of the television networks TQS, TVA and Radio-Canada for the videotapes. Police want to use the video, shot on May 30, 2003 at the Quebec City court house, as part of their investigation into a juvenile prostitution ring. The video shows comments made by Robert Gillet, a radio host accused in the case, as he leaves the court room. Crown prosecutors are considering using the declarations during his trial.Radio-Canada obtained a suspension on the execution of the search warrants. The three television stations named in the search warrants have announced their intention to contest the warrants’ validity on June 13th, 2003 before the Quebec Superior Court. to go further January 15, 2021 Find out more News Follow the news on Canada CanadaAmericas “We must impose democratic obligations on the leading digital players” June 6, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Quebec City police threaten to seize video recordings from three local television stations November 19, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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Europe

first_img Organisation Download the full version RSF calls for a fully transparent investigation after mine kills two journalists in Azerbaijan News RSF_en January 25, 2012 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Europe “We’ll hold Ilham Aliyev personally responsible if anything happens to this blogger in France” RSF says Related documents Индекс свободы прессы 2011-2012PDF – 229.8 KB June 8, 2021 Find out more News June 7, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Europe – Central Asiacenter_img Receive email alerts June 4, 2021 Find out more Europe – Central Asia Differences increase in EuropeЧитать по-русскиEuropean Union more heterogeneous, Balkans facing EU entry challengeWhile Finland and Norway again share first place, Bulgaria (80th) and Greece (70th) have kept their status as the European Union’s bad performers. Targeted attacks and death threats against journalists marked the past year in Bulgaria, where concerns about print media pluralism grew. In Greece, the economic crisis highlighted the fragility of its media while photographers and cameramen covering demonstrations were exposed to conditions resembling war zones. Hungary fell 17 rungs to 40th place after adopting a law giving the ruling party direct control over the media and amending its constitution in December. The precedent set by this legislation, adopted with little comment from other EU member states, has further dented the European model’s credibility.France is still in a disappointing position (38th), as concern continues about protection of the confidentiality of sources and the ability of investigative journalists to cover influential figures close to the government. Italy (61st), which still has a dozen or so journalists under police protection, has turned the page on several years of conflict of interest with Silvio Berlusconi’s departure. But this year’s ranking still bears his mark, especially another attempt to introduce a gag law and an attempt to introduce Internet filtering without reference to the courts, both narrowly rejected. Against the extraordinary backdrop of the News of the World affair, the United Kingdom (28th) caused concern with its approach to the protection of privacy and its response to the London riots. Despite universal condemnation, the UK also clings to a surreal law that allows the entire world to come and sue news media before its courts.The contrast among the three Baltic countries sharpened. Estonia (3rd) stayed at the top of the index but Lithuania and Latvia fell to 30th and 50th respectively as a result of grotesque court rulings and increased interference by the security services. Relations between the government and media have improved somewhat in Slovakia (25th) since Robert Fico, who was heavy-handed in his methods and crude in his language with journalists, ceased to be prime minister.The economic crisis accentuated the Balkan media’s problems – use of the media for private or criminal interests, unfair competition in very small markets, and self-censorship by a growing number of badly paid journalists. Judicial officials – many of them poorly trained, allied with the government and often corrupt – seem more interested in harassing the media than ending impunity for those who threaten or physically attack journalists. This was the case, for example in Bosnia-Herzegovina (58th), Montenegro (107th), Albania (96th) and Macedonia (94th), which lost 40 per cent of its media with the closure of Plus Produkcija, a company that owned three dailies and the leading privately-owned TV station.Turkey back to old habits, Azerbaijan and Belarus locked into repressionTurkey continued its descent, this time falling 10 places to 148th. Despite the diversity and energy of its media, 2011 saw a dramatic escalation in the judicial harassment of journalists. Under the pretext of combating terrorism, dozens were jailed before being tried, above all in the investigations into the Ergenekon conspiracy and the KCK, an alleged political offshoot of the outlawed Kurdistan Workers Party. The unprecedented extension of the range of arrests, the massive phone taps and the contempt shown for the confidentiality of journalists’ sources have helped to reintroduce a climate of intimidation in the media.In Russia (142nd), the media freedom panorama continues to be gloomy. The conviction of a couple for the double murder of Anastasia Baburova and Stanislav Markelov raised hopes but aspects of the case remained unclarified and impunity is still the rule for those who murder or attack journalists. Tougher sentences for such crimes and the decriminalization of media offences were both good news but the impact of these reforms remains to be determined, especially in the absence of an overhaul of anti-terrorist legislation. The unprecedented demonstrations in December 2011 augur a period of uncertainty – while some newsrooms seem to be becoming more outspoken, the state’s repressive apparatus has so far been able to cope with the unrest.After cracking down violently on pro-democracy protests, both Belarus (168th) and Azerbaijan (162nd) have fallen sharply and are approaching the bottom of the index. Their leaders, Alexander Lukashenko and Ilham Aliyev, are both predators of press freedom and both made the media pay for the way their authority was challenged on the streets – in Belarus, more than 100 journalists and bloggers arrested (and around 30 of them given jail sentences), increased harassment of independent media and deportation of foreign journalists. Not content with this indiscriminate repression, Belarus’ self-styled “Batka” (Father) went on to turn the media into the scapegoat for all of his country’s problems. Similar methods were used in Azerbaijan, where special emphasis was put on surveillance of social networks and where netizens were jailed just for issuing online calls for demonstrations. Violence is back in a big way there, with threats, beatings, and abduction of opposition journalists and, for the first time in five years, an Azerbaijani journalist murdered.No longer the leader in the southern Caucasus, Georgia (104th) is paying the price for the violent dispersal of an opposition demonstration in May and the persistent harassment of journalists and bloggers suspected of sympathizing with Russia. Armenia’s 24-place rise in the index seems spectacular, but in fact it has just gone back to where it was three years ago, before the brutal crackdown after the disputed 2008 elections. The media are nonetheless subject to constant judicial harassment and the size of the damages demanded in lawsuits is intimidating. Self-regulation is a major challenge that still needs to be tackled.In Central Asia, Kyrgyzstan turned the page on a 2010 marked by a cruel dictatorship’s violent death throes and inter-ethnic massacres in the south and achieved the region’s best ranking (108th). The media freedom situation nonetheless continues to be very fragile, with physical attacks on journalists and repressive initiatives by parliament. It was a bad year in neighbouring Tajikistan (122nd), where the authorities continue to brandish the spectre of civil war and radical Islamism to try to gag the independent media.Kazakhstan’s ranking (154th) improved only because so many other countries plunged on the index this year. In reality, in a bid to maintain a facade of stability at all costs, the Kazakh authorities have stepped up their persecution of the few independent voices and are trying to gain control of the Internet. Online content also focused the attention of the dictatorships in Uzbekistan (157th) and Turkmenistan (177th), which made no progress. The Turkmen public have access only to a highly-censored national Intranet, but the war of information 2.0 has now begun with the few Turkmen online resources based abroad.Ukraine (116th) rose a few rungs after its all-time low in 2010, marked by journalist Vasyl Klymentyev’s disappearance, but the negative’s tendencies seen since Viktor Yanukovych’s installation as president in February 2010 – return of censorship and many physical attacks on journalists that have gone unpunished – have continued. Respect judicial independence in cases of two leading journalists in Serbia and Montenegro, RSF says News Help by sharing this information Europe – Central Asia News to go furtherlast_img read more

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Motorists urged to watch out for cross winds today

first_img Twitter Facebook Twitter Journey home will be easier – Paul Hegarty AudioHomepage BannerNews WhatsApp Derry draw with Pats: Higgins & Thomson Reaction Previous articleProtest over water problems at Letterkenny estate gets underway todayNext articleDonegal peaks in number of social housing turndowns News Highland Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Harps come back to win in Waterford Pinterestcenter_img Google+ Pinterest By News Highland – April 15, 2019 Motorists urged to watch out for cross winds today WhatsApp News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 Google+ DL Debate – 24/05/21 Drivers are being warned of hazardous conditions on the roads this morning after heavy rain in many places overnight.A yellow wind warning’s in effect for Donegal until 7pm.The Road Safety Authority’s Brian Farrell is advising motorists to watch out for cross-winds:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/farghjghjghjghrell7am.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.last_img read more

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800 extra college places announced ahead of CAO offers

first_img Journey home will be easier – Paul Hegarty Google+ Twitter Facebook Pinterest DL Debate – 24/05/21 FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR An extra 800 college places have been announced ahead of CAO offers coming out on Friday.Points for third level courses are expected to rise after record Leaving Cert results this week.The Higher Education Minister is expecting more students to get their first choice course this year than any other year.Simon Harris has told the Dail more places are being made available to deal with points going up:Audio Playerhttps://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/12harris-college-clip-sm.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Facebook AudioHomepage BannerNews News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24thcenter_img Twitter Harps come back to win in Waterford WhatsApp Pinterest By News Highland – September 9, 2020 WhatsApp Derry draw with Pats: Higgins & Thomson Reaction Google+ Previous articleCalls on Government to publish more details on Covid-19 clustersNext articleReview’s raises concerns over price practices used by some insurance companies News Highland 800 extra college places announced ahead of CAO offerslast_img read more

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HSE in Donegal urged to conduct survey on staff supports

first_img Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic HSE in Donegal urged to conduct survey on staff supports WhatsApp FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 Pinterest Twitter DL Debate – 24/05/21 Facebook The HSE in Donegal is being urged to conduct a survey among its staff in relation to supports available to them.A wide range of supports have been available to healthcare staff during the pandemic while a number of new initiatives were also introduced.Staff in healthcare settings are said to work in a pressurising environment in normal circumstances but there’s concern that COVID-19 has significantly added to their workload.Cllr Gerry Crawford says while there are supports on offer, it’s important that staff have the opportunity to share their views on them:Audio Playerhttps://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/cradfgfdgdfgwford1pm-2.wav00:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Google+ Harps come back to win in Waterford Pinterestcenter_img By News Highland – July 30, 2020 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Twitter AudioHomepage BannerNews Derry draw with Pats: Higgins & Thomson Reaction WhatsApp Facebook Previous articleCllr calls for more mental health training for GardaiNext articleCovid-19 results in over 500 new websites in Donegal News Highland Google+last_img read more

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Broward Sheriff’s Office loses accreditation over mass shooting response

first_imgamphotora/iStock(ORLANDO, Fla.) — Florida’s largest sheriff’s office had its law enforcement accreditation revoked over its response to two deadly mass shootings, but the office’s new leader said it’s unfair to punish his team for the “previous administration’s mishandling.” The Commission for Florida Law Enforcement Accreditation voted 13-0 to revoke the Broward County Sheriff’s Office of its accreditation, citing its botched response to the 2018 shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland that left 17 dead. It also cited missteps connected to the 2017 Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport shooting, which left five dead. The vote took place during the commission meeting last Wednesday in Orlando. The accreditation is a voluntary certification and the loss isn’t expected to affect BSO’s day-to-day operations. But the sheriff said the loss was insulting nevertheless.“It is disheartening for the hardworking members of the Broward Sheriff’s Office to lose our accreditation because of the previous administration’s mishandling of two devastating events in our community,” Sheriff Gregory Tony told ABC News in a statement on Tuesday. “Since recently taking command, I have worked on improving BSO and repairing the effects of bad leadership and negligence by focusing on training and community relations.”“I will continue working hard to ensure that all Broward residents feel safe and that our agency’s reputation and honor are restored,” he added.Broward County Sheriff’s Office Deputy Scot Peterson, 56, was terminated from his position last month and charged with multiple counts of child neglect after an internal investigation found that he retreated while students were under attack in the February 2018 shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas.Internal investigators claimed Peterson “did absolutely nothing to mitigate the MSD shooting,” according to a statement released by the agency. He faces seven counts of neglect of a child, three counts of culpable negligence and one count of perjury. He has not yet entered a plea.Peterson’s attorney, Joseph DiRuzzo, said in a statement after Peterson’s arrest that his client was being made a scapegoat.“The State’s actions appear to be nothing more than a thinly veiled attempt at politically motivated retribution against Mr. Peterson, as no other individual employed at the Broward Sheriff’s Office or Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School has been criminally charged,” DiRuzzo said.Three other deputies were also fired over their apparent inaction as a result of an internal affairs probe.“They have been terminated and will no longer be privileged to serve as law enforcement deputies for the Broward Sheriff’s Office,” the statement said. “We have enhanced our active shooter response protocol, increased our training staff, introduced essential equipment, established training partnerships with federal organizations and are building a regional training center.” Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Speech: Supporting women experiencing homelessness conference

first_imgIntroductionI’m absolutely delighted to join you; it’s wonderful to see some familiar faces. I’m grateful to Homeless Link for bringing us all together today – it’s a real tribute to your convening power.It’s essential that those of us on the frontline of homelessness and rough sleeping keep talking to each other, especially as we think about how we can support women experiencing homelessness.Damp and miserable days like on the weekend we’ve just had are a reminder of how much we can take the roof over our heads for granted.The fact is, still too many people live without the security of a home; still too many people are living outside on our streets. It’s something we’re all painfully aware of.And you know the stats as well as anyone. It’s a difficult picture.Since 2010, homelessness acceptances have gone down, but rough sleeping is up by 169% and the numbers of people in temporary accommodation are also up.This government has never had any illusions about the scale of the challenge we face. In fact, it’s something we’re determined to tackle head-on.It’s why we’ve committed to halve rough sleeping by 2022 and end it for good by 2027.But while stats and targets are important, today is about a lot more than that.Each individual that is homeless or sleeping rough represents a very individual challenge. There’ll never be a one size fits all solution. It’s about looking at those very complex and personal needs and challenges.Challenges for womenCompared to decades before, more women are experiencing homelessness or sleeping rough. To compound this challenge, they’re often less visible – a choice they often deliberately make to help them stay safe.It means that, tragically, we often know less about their needs than the men who sleep rough.But their challenges and needs are real and complex: long-term trauma, substance misuse, self-harm – the list goes on.St Mungo’s latest report on women sleeping rough showed that women are more likely than men to need support for mental health problems.It also highlighted how a third of women in their services who had slept rough cited domestic abuse as the key factor to their homelessness.Perhaps the most shocking part is the average age of death for women who live on the street or in homeless accommodation: just 43 years old. That’s decades younger than the average population, and totally unacceptable in 2018.Helping women at the local levelIt’s why we’ve been so determined to put the needs of women at the heart of our efforts to end rough sleeping.Backed by £100 million of funding over the next 2 years, our Rough Sleeping Strategy sets out a blueprint for getting people the right support in the longer-term.And our Rough Sleeping Initiative brings experts from across the sector together to take urgent measures right now.The £30 million fund has been allocated to 83 different authorities who have the highest number of rough sleepers, and we were pleased to announce a further £45 million of funding for next year.The money goes beyond just funding new bed spaces; it helps hire dedicated staff such as outreach workers, mental health specialists and substance misuse workers.Crucially, it’s a locally driven approach with local authorities in charge. That matters, because all too often mainstream provision don’t always meet women’s needs, while a locally driven approach can target funds where they’re most needed.It’s something I saw in action on a recent visit to Southend, where they’ve set up 3 units specifically for women who have slept rough, including dedicated and personalised support.Or in Medway, where they’ve used some of their funds for a specialist mental health worker to support people who have experienced domestic abuse and other health issues.Or fantastic projects like Jane’s Place in Lancashire, which is the first refuge for women with complex needs in the North of England – and I was really pleased to see they were awarded a prize at the UK Housing Awards.On this issue, I would also like to highlight that we are working with the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport on the Tampon Tax Fund, which reopened for bids last week – with female homelessness and rough sleeping as a key theme.Unlike many grants, the Tampon Tax Fund works specifically with the charitable sector, so I hope that a number of you here today will take the chance to apply and share your valuable expertise.Domestic abuseIn my role, I’ve been lucky enough to visit so many amazing facilities across the country.Another, a new purpose built refuge in Stafford called ForWard House, offers vital safety and specialist support for survivors of domestic abuse. It’s inclusive facilities include support for larger families, BME groups, older women and women and children with disabilities.It was something to be proud of. But at the same time, I also found it tragic that, in too many cases, a woman should need a refuge at all.ForWard House is a stark reminder that domestic abuse can often lie at the heart of the homelessness challenge.That’s why we also need to tackle some of the root causes for women experiencing homelessness.Our priority is clear: we need local areas to response to the needs of all victims of domestic abuse – including those from isolated or marginalised communities.And we’re providing the support they need to do it.Last month we announced the successful projects from our £22 million fund to support victims of domestic abuse (which runs from 2018-2020).It will support 63 projects covering 254 local areas across England, helping more than 25,000 victims and their families, as well as providing an additional 2,200 bed spaces in accommodation-based services, including refuge.We’re also carrying out a review of how domestic abuse services are locally commissioned and funded across England.The review has been informed by an audit, run by Ipsos MORI, of provision of domestic abuse services across England, which will enable us to understand what impact services are having and to identify any gaps.And we’re currently engaging with key domestic abuse partners, including working across-government with the domestic abuse sector and local authorities to develop future, sustainable delivery options for Domestic Abuse Services.OffendersAnd it’s not just our actions around domestic abuse that require a rethink. On female offenders too, there’s a challenge we have to meet.We’re working closely with the Ministry of Justice on the new Female Offenders Strategy. The Strategy shifts the focus from custody to the community, by working with local and national partners to develop a pilot for ‘residential women’s centres’ in at least 5 sites across England and Wales.And they’ve launched an initial £3.5 million grant competition for community services and multi-agency, whole system approaches.We are also working with national and local partners to develop a National Concordat on Female Offenders to set out how local partners and services should be working together in partnership to identify and respond to the often multiple and complex needs of women as they journey through the criminal justice system. Not a happy journey at all.ConclusionThese kinds of initiatives recognise that these are complex issues – issues we know won’t disappear overnight. But we’re committed to working in the long term.Our strategy, for example, is just the first step in a 9-year journey. And it’s essential that we’re open and transparent about progress – because it’s just too important to risk getting it wrong.That’s why we’re committed to publishing annual public updates to the strategy.Yes, it’s a chance to highlight the progress we’ve made. But equally, it’s an opportunity to identify the new interventions we need to achieve our commitment, and show how we test different approaches, learn from new evidence and scale up and roll out our programmes.It’s an approach that, I hope, will bring us closer to our partners – people like you. Because we need to work with all of you, on the frontline, if we want to achieve a future where rough sleeping is a thing of the past.Thank you.last_img read more

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Sr. Eva Hooker reads from newly published poetry book

first_imgThere’s a winged godwit walking along a lake shore on the cover of Sr. Eva Mary Hooker’s newly published book of poetry.Hooker performed a reading of “Godwit,” which was released this month, in Rice Commons on Thursday night.Hooker, a 1963 graduate of the College and faculty member of the English department, spoke about her experiences with the book’s namesake bird.“My first encounter with godwits was at Crane Beach and Plum Island, both in Massachusetts,” Hooker said. “My next encounter was in the prairie grasslands of Minnesota. Godwits with wet feet, godwits making themselves fat for the long flight from Minnesota to South America by way of the Atlantic coast.”Hooker said the bird’s name comes from the old English word meaning good creature and that the name itself is also a glorious pun. The godwit is famous today for its long migration, with the bar-tailed godwit making an unbroken 7,257 mile flight from Alaska to New Zealand by way of China each year, she said.The first section of the book is called “Godsalt,” in reference to a metaphor used by Cormac McCarthy in his novel “The Road,” she said.“I want to move that possession of salt, which is in the deep of God, into the possession of the soul as what I call inflorescence blooming of the soul,” Hooker said.A poem titled “Solomon’s Seal” is named after a protected flower Hooker came upon behind Riedinger House on Saint Mary’s campus one day, she said. The white space of the printed poems is used for a variety of purposes and, in this case, is used “to imagine the touch of the spirit,” she said.“The middle section [of the book] is called ‘Dark is the shadow of me,’ which is a sequence of poems which explore dark as shadow, a place where soul is a verb, not a noun,” Hooker said. “… In the heart of the sequence, soul is a place of danger.”The third part of the publication is “There is work to do within nothingness,” she said, and one poem in the section shares that title.“At last the day has come when I have a book in my hands that I made,” she said. “Carl Phillips writes that a lyric poem is always, at some level, a testimony at once for a love of the world we must lose, and to the fact of loss itself — and how in that tension between love and loss that the poem enacts there is a particular resinous that he calls mercy. …“… In Godwit, that was my being,” she said. “Mercy as a kind of respite, a geography of heightened consciousness that is within us, as if bodily shaken.”Junior Leah Alday attended the poetry reading and said she appreciated the references Hooker made to outside literary influences.“I really enjoyed that she had a lot of Hildegard references, because not many people I know talk about her,” Alday said. “I learned about her in Germany, so hearing about her in Sr. Eva’s poetry was really beautiful.”Hooker is also the author of “The Winter Keeper” and “Notes for Survival in the Wilderness.” Her poems have been published in journals such as Barrow Street, Cincinnati review, Drunken Boat and many others, assistant professor of English and creative writing Dionne Bremyer said.The reading was part of the spring season’s visiting writer series at the College, sponsored by the English department.Tags: creative writing, English, Godwin, Poetry, Sr. Eva Mary Hookerlast_img read more

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Tix Now On Sale for Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Hamilton on B’way

first_img View Comments Hamilton Star Files from $149.00 Tickets are now available for the Great White Way transfer of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s much-buzzed about Hamilton. The tuner will begin previews on July 13 and officially open on August 6 at the Richard Rodgers Theatre. The show is currently playing off-Broadway at The Public Theater through May 3.Directed by Thomas Kail and featuring a book, music and lyrics by Miranda, Hamilton is inspired by the book Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow. The new musical follows the scrappy young immigrant who forever changed America, from bastard orphan to Washington’s right hand man, rebel to war hero, loving husband caught in the country’s first sex scandal to Treasury head who made an untrusting world believe in the American economy.In addition to Miranda, the cast includes Jonathan Groff as King George, Christopher Jackson as George Washington, Leslie Odom Jr. as Aaron Burr, Phillipa Soo as Eliza Hamilton, Anthony Ramos as John Laurens/Phillip Hamilton, Daveed Diggs as Marquis De Lafayette/Thomas Jefferson and Renée Elise Goldsberry as Angelica Schuyler. All but Groff are confirmed for the Broadway incarnation. Related Shows Lin-Manuel Mirandalast_img read more