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Broward Sheriff’s Office loses accreditation over mass shooting response

first_imgamphotora/iStock(ORLANDO, Fla.) — Florida’s largest sheriff’s office had its law enforcement accreditation revoked over its response to two deadly mass shootings, but the office’s new leader said it’s unfair to punish his team for the “previous administration’s mishandling.” The Commission for Florida Law Enforcement Accreditation voted 13-0 to revoke the Broward County Sheriff’s Office of its accreditation, citing its botched response to the 2018 shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland that left 17 dead. It also cited missteps connected to the 2017 Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport shooting, which left five dead. The vote took place during the commission meeting last Wednesday in Orlando. The accreditation is a voluntary certification and the loss isn’t expected to affect BSO’s day-to-day operations. But the sheriff said the loss was insulting nevertheless.“It is disheartening for the hardworking members of the Broward Sheriff’s Office to lose our accreditation because of the previous administration’s mishandling of two devastating events in our community,” Sheriff Gregory Tony told ABC News in a statement on Tuesday. “Since recently taking command, I have worked on improving BSO and repairing the effects of bad leadership and negligence by focusing on training and community relations.”“I will continue working hard to ensure that all Broward residents feel safe and that our agency’s reputation and honor are restored,” he added.Broward County Sheriff’s Office Deputy Scot Peterson, 56, was terminated from his position last month and charged with multiple counts of child neglect after an internal investigation found that he retreated while students were under attack in the February 2018 shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas.Internal investigators claimed Peterson “did absolutely nothing to mitigate the MSD shooting,” according to a statement released by the agency. He faces seven counts of neglect of a child, three counts of culpable negligence and one count of perjury. He has not yet entered a plea.Peterson’s attorney, Joseph DiRuzzo, said in a statement after Peterson’s arrest that his client was being made a scapegoat.“The State’s actions appear to be nothing more than a thinly veiled attempt at politically motivated retribution against Mr. Peterson, as no other individual employed at the Broward Sheriff’s Office or Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School has been criminally charged,” DiRuzzo said.Three other deputies were also fired over their apparent inaction as a result of an internal affairs probe.“They have been terminated and will no longer be privileged to serve as law enforcement deputies for the Broward Sheriff’s Office,” the statement said. “We have enhanced our active shooter response protocol, increased our training staff, introduced essential equipment, established training partnerships with federal organizations and are building a regional training center.” Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Speech: Supporting women experiencing homelessness conference

first_imgIntroductionI’m absolutely delighted to join you; it’s wonderful to see some familiar faces. I’m grateful to Homeless Link for bringing us all together today – it’s a real tribute to your convening power.It’s essential that those of us on the frontline of homelessness and rough sleeping keep talking to each other, especially as we think about how we can support women experiencing homelessness.Damp and miserable days like on the weekend we’ve just had are a reminder of how much we can take the roof over our heads for granted.The fact is, still too many people live without the security of a home; still too many people are living outside on our streets. It’s something we’re all painfully aware of.And you know the stats as well as anyone. It’s a difficult picture.Since 2010, homelessness acceptances have gone down, but rough sleeping is up by 169% and the numbers of people in temporary accommodation are also up.This government has never had any illusions about the scale of the challenge we face. In fact, it’s something we’re determined to tackle head-on.It’s why we’ve committed to halve rough sleeping by 2022 and end it for good by 2027.But while stats and targets are important, today is about a lot more than that.Each individual that is homeless or sleeping rough represents a very individual challenge. There’ll never be a one size fits all solution. It’s about looking at those very complex and personal needs and challenges.Challenges for womenCompared to decades before, more women are experiencing homelessness or sleeping rough. To compound this challenge, they’re often less visible – a choice they often deliberately make to help them stay safe.It means that, tragically, we often know less about their needs than the men who sleep rough.But their challenges and needs are real and complex: long-term trauma, substance misuse, self-harm – the list goes on.St Mungo’s latest report on women sleeping rough showed that women are more likely than men to need support for mental health problems.It also highlighted how a third of women in their services who had slept rough cited domestic abuse as the key factor to their homelessness.Perhaps the most shocking part is the average age of death for women who live on the street or in homeless accommodation: just 43 years old. That’s decades younger than the average population, and totally unacceptable in 2018.Helping women at the local levelIt’s why we’ve been so determined to put the needs of women at the heart of our efforts to end rough sleeping.Backed by £100 million of funding over the next 2 years, our Rough Sleeping Strategy sets out a blueprint for getting people the right support in the longer-term.And our Rough Sleeping Initiative brings experts from across the sector together to take urgent measures right now.The £30 million fund has been allocated to 83 different authorities who have the highest number of rough sleepers, and we were pleased to announce a further £45 million of funding for next year.The money goes beyond just funding new bed spaces; it helps hire dedicated staff such as outreach workers, mental health specialists and substance misuse workers.Crucially, it’s a locally driven approach with local authorities in charge. That matters, because all too often mainstream provision don’t always meet women’s needs, while a locally driven approach can target funds where they’re most needed.It’s something I saw in action on a recent visit to Southend, where they’ve set up 3 units specifically for women who have slept rough, including dedicated and personalised support.Or in Medway, where they’ve used some of their funds for a specialist mental health worker to support people who have experienced domestic abuse and other health issues.Or fantastic projects like Jane’s Place in Lancashire, which is the first refuge for women with complex needs in the North of England – and I was really pleased to see they were awarded a prize at the UK Housing Awards.On this issue, I would also like to highlight that we are working with the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport on the Tampon Tax Fund, which reopened for bids last week – with female homelessness and rough sleeping as a key theme.Unlike many grants, the Tampon Tax Fund works specifically with the charitable sector, so I hope that a number of you here today will take the chance to apply and share your valuable expertise.Domestic abuseIn my role, I’ve been lucky enough to visit so many amazing facilities across the country.Another, a new purpose built refuge in Stafford called ForWard House, offers vital safety and specialist support for survivors of domestic abuse. It’s inclusive facilities include support for larger families, BME groups, older women and women and children with disabilities.It was something to be proud of. But at the same time, I also found it tragic that, in too many cases, a woman should need a refuge at all.ForWard House is a stark reminder that domestic abuse can often lie at the heart of the homelessness challenge.That’s why we also need to tackle some of the root causes for women experiencing homelessness.Our priority is clear: we need local areas to response to the needs of all victims of domestic abuse – including those from isolated or marginalised communities.And we’re providing the support they need to do it.Last month we announced the successful projects from our £22 million fund to support victims of domestic abuse (which runs from 2018-2020).It will support 63 projects covering 254 local areas across England, helping more than 25,000 victims and their families, as well as providing an additional 2,200 bed spaces in accommodation-based services, including refuge.We’re also carrying out a review of how domestic abuse services are locally commissioned and funded across England.The review has been informed by an audit, run by Ipsos MORI, of provision of domestic abuse services across England, which will enable us to understand what impact services are having and to identify any gaps.And we’re currently engaging with key domestic abuse partners, including working across-government with the domestic abuse sector and local authorities to develop future, sustainable delivery options for Domestic Abuse Services.OffendersAnd it’s not just our actions around domestic abuse that require a rethink. On female offenders too, there’s a challenge we have to meet.We’re working closely with the Ministry of Justice on the new Female Offenders Strategy. The Strategy shifts the focus from custody to the community, by working with local and national partners to develop a pilot for ‘residential women’s centres’ in at least 5 sites across England and Wales.And they’ve launched an initial £3.5 million grant competition for community services and multi-agency, whole system approaches.We are also working with national and local partners to develop a National Concordat on Female Offenders to set out how local partners and services should be working together in partnership to identify and respond to the often multiple and complex needs of women as they journey through the criminal justice system. Not a happy journey at all.ConclusionThese kinds of initiatives recognise that these are complex issues – issues we know won’t disappear overnight. But we’re committed to working in the long term.Our strategy, for example, is just the first step in a 9-year journey. And it’s essential that we’re open and transparent about progress – because it’s just too important to risk getting it wrong.That’s why we’re committed to publishing annual public updates to the strategy.Yes, it’s a chance to highlight the progress we’ve made. But equally, it’s an opportunity to identify the new interventions we need to achieve our commitment, and show how we test different approaches, learn from new evidence and scale up and roll out our programmes.It’s an approach that, I hope, will bring us closer to our partners – people like you. Because we need to work with all of you, on the frontline, if we want to achieve a future where rough sleeping is a thing of the past.Thank you.last_img read more

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Sr. Eva Hooker reads from newly published poetry book

first_imgThere’s a winged godwit walking along a lake shore on the cover of Sr. Eva Mary Hooker’s newly published book of poetry.Hooker performed a reading of “Godwit,” which was released this month, in Rice Commons on Thursday night.Hooker, a 1963 graduate of the College and faculty member of the English department, spoke about her experiences with the book’s namesake bird.“My first encounter with godwits was at Crane Beach and Plum Island, both in Massachusetts,” Hooker said. “My next encounter was in the prairie grasslands of Minnesota. Godwits with wet feet, godwits making themselves fat for the long flight from Minnesota to South America by way of the Atlantic coast.”Hooker said the bird’s name comes from the old English word meaning good creature and that the name itself is also a glorious pun. The godwit is famous today for its long migration, with the bar-tailed godwit making an unbroken 7,257 mile flight from Alaska to New Zealand by way of China each year, she said.The first section of the book is called “Godsalt,” in reference to a metaphor used by Cormac McCarthy in his novel “The Road,” she said.“I want to move that possession of salt, which is in the deep of God, into the possession of the soul as what I call inflorescence blooming of the soul,” Hooker said.A poem titled “Solomon’s Seal” is named after a protected flower Hooker came upon behind Riedinger House on Saint Mary’s campus one day, she said. The white space of the printed poems is used for a variety of purposes and, in this case, is used “to imagine the touch of the spirit,” she said.“The middle section [of the book] is called ‘Dark is the shadow of me,’ which is a sequence of poems which explore dark as shadow, a place where soul is a verb, not a noun,” Hooker said. “… In the heart of the sequence, soul is a place of danger.”The third part of the publication is “There is work to do within nothingness,” she said, and one poem in the section shares that title.“At last the day has come when I have a book in my hands that I made,” she said. “Carl Phillips writes that a lyric poem is always, at some level, a testimony at once for a love of the world we must lose, and to the fact of loss itself — and how in that tension between love and loss that the poem enacts there is a particular resinous that he calls mercy. …“… In Godwit, that was my being,” she said. “Mercy as a kind of respite, a geography of heightened consciousness that is within us, as if bodily shaken.”Junior Leah Alday attended the poetry reading and said she appreciated the references Hooker made to outside literary influences.“I really enjoyed that she had a lot of Hildegard references, because not many people I know talk about her,” Alday said. “I learned about her in Germany, so hearing about her in Sr. Eva’s poetry was really beautiful.”Hooker is also the author of “The Winter Keeper” and “Notes for Survival in the Wilderness.” Her poems have been published in journals such as Barrow Street, Cincinnati review, Drunken Boat and many others, assistant professor of English and creative writing Dionne Bremyer said.The reading was part of the spring season’s visiting writer series at the College, sponsored by the English department.Tags: creative writing, English, Godwin, Poetry, Sr. Eva Mary Hookerlast_img read more

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Tix Now On Sale for Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Hamilton on B’way

first_img View Comments Hamilton Star Files from $149.00 Tickets are now available for the Great White Way transfer of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s much-buzzed about Hamilton. The tuner will begin previews on July 13 and officially open on August 6 at the Richard Rodgers Theatre. The show is currently playing off-Broadway at The Public Theater through May 3.Directed by Thomas Kail and featuring a book, music and lyrics by Miranda, Hamilton is inspired by the book Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow. The new musical follows the scrappy young immigrant who forever changed America, from bastard orphan to Washington’s right hand man, rebel to war hero, loving husband caught in the country’s first sex scandal to Treasury head who made an untrusting world believe in the American economy.In addition to Miranda, the cast includes Jonathan Groff as King George, Christopher Jackson as George Washington, Leslie Odom Jr. as Aaron Burr, Phillipa Soo as Eliza Hamilton, Anthony Ramos as John Laurens/Phillip Hamilton, Daveed Diggs as Marquis De Lafayette/Thomas Jefferson and Renée Elise Goldsberry as Angelica Schuyler. All but Groff are confirmed for the Broadway incarnation. Related Shows Lin-Manuel Mirandalast_img read more

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Governor to Address Rising Fuel and Food Costs

first_imgWHAT:           Gov. to Announce NewProgram to Assist with Food and Fuel CostsRandolph, Vt. – Governor Jim Douglastomorrow will announce a comprehensive new program to help Vermonters address increasinghome heating, gasoline and food costs. The Governor will be joined by members of a cabinet-level inter-agencytask force charged with working with public, non-profit and private partners toimplement his plan. WHEN:           Thursday, June 12,2008 – 2:00 p.m. ### Governorto Announce Comprehensive Program to Help Vermonters Address Rising Fuel andFood Costs Jason GibbsGovernor’sCommunications Director109 State Street ¨ The Pavilion ¨ Montpelier,VT 05609-0101 ¨ www.vermont.gov/governor(link is external)Telephone: 802.828.3333 ¨ Fax: 802.828.3339 ¨ TDD: 802.828.3345 WHERE:        VermontTechnical College,Administration Building,Randolph·        From I-89, Exit 4 ramp, turn onto Rt. 66 headinguphill·        Proceed 3/4 mile to intersection at top of hill (cars travelingup the hill have right of way at the intersection)·        Drive straight through the intersection to accesscampus from main entrancelast_img read more

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The Reach of Ideas

first_imgBy Dialogo April 01, 2012 Transnational organized crime disguises itself as a government in places where state presence is weak, tramples on moral values and brings mourning to Latin American families. The resulting climate of insecurity poisons the ground for economic and social development to take root. To outline strategies and unite efforts against this adversary, which lacks scruples and is rich in resources to finance misdeeds, information operations officers from Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Panama and the United States met at U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) headquarters in Miami, Florida, in early March 2012. Organized by SOUTHCOM’s Information Operations Division, the event promoted the exchange of ideas and lessons learned among countries that share similar challenges, despite experiencing distinct political, economic, cultural and social situations. Brigadier General Steve Arthur, deputy director of SOUTHCOM’s operations division, emphasized the need to work together. “It’s very important that some of us unite and make use of our resources, our material assets and our budgets focused on specific objectives, and your presence here, the fact that you’re meeting here and talking about these issues, is essential in order to move forward in our region,” he said in his welcoming address. During two days of presentations and debates, participants insisted that information operations are a high-caliber weapon for regional military and security forces. Colombia’s expertise in the area stood out. Colonel Javier Molina Calero, director of Information Operations Planning of the Joint Integrated Action Bureau of the South American country’s Armed Forces General Command, spoke about the success of the Integrated Action program in the battle to win Colombians’ hearts and minds. Based on the idea that today’s wars are won with intelligence, more than with force, the program offers a combination of security and the presence of the state in areas that have been at the mercy of guerrillas and drug traffickers for decades. The aim is to permanently uproot irregular groups and contribute to promoting social development with a holistic approach. Representatives of Ecuador said that their country’s Armed Forces organize courses for journalists working for the domestic press. This provides the journalists with a revealing look into the life of Ecuadorean Military personnel, they explained. In Ecuador, information operations directly support the military objectives of the Armed Forces Joint Command (COMACO) and the five operational commands distributed in different areas of the nation. In Ecuador’s northern operational command, which protects 700 kilometers of border with Colombia, information operations are essential to counteract the messages of Voz de la Resistencia (Voice of the Resistance), the broadcast operated by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia. Lieutenant Colonel Jorge Villalba, COMACO’s information operations director, highlighted the equipment and training they have received from the U.S. Embassy’s Military Support Group. In addition, the Ecuadorean Army War College already has an information operations course from which several Ecuadorean officers and a Brazilian Army major have just graduated, Lt. Col. Villalba added. Beyond the Borders Protecting the borders is also on the agenda of the Panamanian security forces. Since Panama is an entry point to Central America from the south, the task of the National Border Service (SENAFRONT) is to prevent the nation from being used by organized crime and drug traffickers. Major Eduardo Araúz, a SENAFRONT information operations officer, explained that his work concentrates on neutralizing the illegal activity of criminal organizations and working with the population to protect it from the influence of those groups. Part of this task concentrates on remote towns where the Colombian flag flew until recently. “We’re beginning to bring our tactical, humanitarian aid, and civil operations there, and information operations so that they feel Panamanian,” Araúz commented. “It’s important that they see for themselves that the state is present in each community, in each hamlet, and that we’re bringing them security,” he added. Borders, on the other hand, sometimes inhibit the free flow of experiences among regional military personnel and security forces. Following two days of dialogue, the information officers who participated in the event committed themselves to maintaining an active exchange of knowledge and lessons learned. Visits, regional workshops and joint training were some of the options mentioned by the attendees. Colombia, for example, said that the doors of the International Missions and Integrated Action School are open to students from other nations, while Ecuador offered help in planning, implementation and the training of officers from Latin American countries that do not have information operations programs, as in the case of Mexico. Finally, Colonel Miguel Hobbs, chief of SOUTHCOM’s Information Operations Division, suggested using the All Partners Access Network (APAN), a social-networking tool, to solidify the ties created during the event and learn from one another.center_img Pamphlets, radio stations and other traditional tools are not sufficient to counteract decades of influence by guerrillas and criminal gangs, Col. Molina said. His department develops information operations campaigns that are intertwined with civic support activities to benefit the affected populations and serve to reinforce the Integrated Action program. Among those efforts, he said, is the campaign Fe en la Causa (Faith in the Cause), which highlights the morale and prestige of Colombian Military personnel, as well as other campaigns that are aimed at promoting demobilization, restoring trust in the legal system and the state, and preventing the recruitment of children, adolescents and women. Say It Yourself As in the case of Colombia, it became clear to the other countries represented at the event that the challenge of getting people to trust military personnel is as important or more important now than ever. According to Colonel Rony Urízar, a spokesman for the Guatemalan Defense Ministry, his country’s Army enjoys a positive credibility rating among 81 percent of the population. This achievement, he said, is due to synchronizing words and deeds and by using transparency in handling information. Col. Urízar said that telling the story first, before others shape it as they see fit, is part of the mission of his work team. “Say it all, say it in time, say it yourself,” he stressed, repeating the words of Eduardo Ramírez, who spoke on behalf of SOUTHCOM’s Office of Strategic Communications. last_img read more

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Understanding secured credit cards

first_img 34SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John San Filippo John San Filippo is the founder and president of OmniChannel Communications Inc. He has nearly 40 years of experience in financial services and technology. He’s written for every major … Web: www.financialfeed.com Details In today’s digital world, it’s hard to do anything without a credit card. Sure, a debit card helps. But life’s little emergencies always seem to pop up right when you’re a little short on cash.If you have good credit, it’s easy to get a credit card. On the other hand, if you haven’t established much credit, or worse yet, your credit score has taken an unfortunate downturn, what can you do? One possibility is a secured credit card.The concept is pretty straightforward. You deposit a certain amount into an interest-bearing account at the card-issuing institution and agree to leave it there. In return, the institution issues you a major credit card with a credit limit equal to the amount of your deposit. If you default on your credit card, the institution can seize your deposit to satisfy your debt.Like any other product, there are good secured credit cards and not-so-good secured credit cards. Here are three things to consider when evaluating a secured credit card:Interest rate: The first and most obvious thing to consider is the card’s interest rate. Some institutions offer secured credit cards for as low as 8.99%, while rates in the high teens or low twenties are more common. Be careful, though. Some predatory secured credit card providers charge as high as 36% interest.Fees: Reputable financial institutions don’t gouge you with excessive fees. Unfortunately, the same can’t be said for many secured credit card providers. For example, some of these companies require both a $125 annual fee plus a $120 annual maintenance fee. That means if you start out with a modest $500 credit limit, your starting available credit will actually only be $255. And of course, you’ll pay interest on those fees because they show up as charges on your card.How it’s reported: An unsecured credit card will look better on your credit report than a secured one. Interestingly, some secured credit cards report as secured, while others report as unsecured. While this isn’t necessarily a deal breaker, you should be aware of how your particular card reports.last_img read more

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Historic Brightwaters Home Designed By Famous Architect Asks $1.1M

first_imgFor more real estate news, visit longislandpress.com/category/real-estate.Sign up for Long Island Press’ email newsletters here. Sign up for home delivery of Long Island Press here. Sign up for discounts by becoming a Long Island Press community partner here. Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A historic, six-bedroom house designed by Williamsburg Bridge architect Henry Hornbostel is listed for sale at 92 S Windsor Ave. in Brightwaters.Built in 1904, the home exudes plenty of old world charm while also having up-to-date features, including hardwood floors and custom woodwork, as well as cathedral ceilings, an entrance foyer, formal dining room, and powder room.Its exterior architectural style is antique/hist, and the house was constructed with blown-in insulation and cedar.The home’s many large windows let in ample natural light throughout the entire house. Sunlight also shines through the solarium, which leads to a two-level deck overlooking the .9-acre property. The 3,974-square foot house has three bathrooms and two half bathrooms, two garage spaces, a family room, living room, home office, eat-in kitchen, and home office. Included in the six bedrooms is one master bedroom with a master bathroom.This listing has a wealth of living space, both inside and out. The entrance foyer, family room/den, outdoor decks, and yard could all host guests aplenty. Plus, the village allows access to nearby beach, dock, and tennis courts, and the bay is a short walk away.The asking price is $1,199,000, not including the annual property tax of $23,581.The real estate agent listed for the property is Craig Maerki, of Meg Smith & Associates, who can be reached at 631-647-7013.last_img read more

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First direct flights between New York and Cuba took off today

first_img Share NEW YORK (AP) – The first direct charter flights between New York City and Cuba took off from Havana en route to the John F Kennedy Airport today.Cuba Travel Services has started offering a weekly Tuesday charter between John F Kennedy International Airport and Havana. The flights are operated by Sun County Airlines, and cost $849 round-trip. The price includes airfare, Cuban medical insurance and US departure taxes.In January, the Obama administration announced it would be easing travel restrictions.Despite improving relations, tourism is still banned. Travelers must still declare a purpose that fits into one of the 12 approved categories, including family visits, government work and journalism. But most visitors no longer need to apply for a special license and wait for US government approval. Share 150 Views   no discussions Tweetcenter_img Sharing is caring! Share BusinessLifestyleTravel First direct flights between New York and Cuba took off today by: Associated Press – March 18, 2015last_img read more

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OA hosts Maverick Challenge

first_imgFirst row – left to right: Greg Schroeder, Haleigh Reed, Emily Cornett and Dresden Lonergan. Second Row: Ethan Eldridge, Sam Hutchinson, Samantha Nobbe and Cori Hammoor and Third Row: Cheryll Obendorff, Shelly Lunsford and Jonathon MapleOLDENBURG, Ind. — Oldenburg Academy recently hosted the Maverick Challenge, a business planning competition.Judges from the community ranked the 14 students based on the business plans and products they created for the competition.Third place winner, which received $100, was Our Gift, a website and business model to help non-profits grow their donor basis and donationsthis business plan was created by Greg Schroeder and Ethan EldridgeSecond place winner receiving $200 was Forget Me Not, a car seat alarm to ensure that babies are not left in the car unattendedthis was invented by Cori Hammoor, Emily Cornett and Dresden LonerganThe first place winner received $300 and went to The Bean Company, a company that makes products out of leftover coffee grounds from local businessesthis was created by Sam Hutchinson, Samantha Nobbe and Haleigh Reed.Oldenburg Academy was the only school to participate in the program from Ripley and Franklin Counties.last_img read more