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Neandertals Were No Copycats

first_imgSometimes it seems Neandertals just can’t catch a break. Every time an archaeologist comes up with new evidence for something cool and clever they did, another researcher claims they learned it from their modern human cousins. But new discoveries of polished bone tools at two prehistoric sites in France suggest that Neandertals independently invented these finely made implements, without a helping hand from Homo sapiens. The finds may represent the best sign yet that Neandertals were no boneheads when it came to technological innovation.Neandertals lived in Europe and Asia between about 135,000 and 35,000 years ago, after which they went extinct. For a long while they had the territory to themselves; but then, sometime between about 45,000 and 40,000 years ago, modern humans moved into Europe from Africa. At roughly the same time, Neandertal behavior seemed to change and become more “modern”: Their stone tools became more sophisticated, they began to wear jewelry, and they started using bone tools. For many archaeologists, the timing strongly suggested that Neandertals had copied modern human behavior. But other researchers insisted that Neandertals had developed the behaviors before modern humans came to town. The debate often revolved around esoteric discussions of how to interpret radiocarbon dates from sites that both Neandertals and moderns had occupied, contamination of Neandertal sites by modern human artifacts, and other technical details.Now, two teams of archaeologists working at Neandertal sites in the Dordogne region of southwest France have found four sophisticated bone tools that they say are dated earlier than the first known existence of modern humans in the region. Three of the bones were found by a team led by Shannon McPherron of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, working at a site called the Abri Peyrony; and the fourth, by a group led by Marie Soressi of Leiden University in the Netherlands, at the site of Pech-de-l’Azé, about 35 kilometers away.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)As the two teams jointly report online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, all the bone tools, made from either red deer or reindeer ribs, are a specialized type of implement called a lissoir (French for “to polish”), previously found only at modern human sites. Most archaeologists think that lissoirs, which have a smooth rounded tip, were used to make animal hides more lustrous and impermeable to water (see drawing above); fine striations found on the bone implements were consistent with that use.The team says there’s little doubt that Neandertals made the bone tools, because both sites also feature stone tools typical of Neandertal culture—such as handheld axs and a distinctive knife—and show no evidence of modern human occupation at any time. As for the possibility that Neandertals learned this skill from modern humans, the archaeologists say that the dates from the sites make this very unlikely. Radiocarbon analysis of the archaeological layers where the bones were found at Abri Peyrony range from nearly 48,000 to 41,000 years ago, thus beginning before the earliest known modern human occupation of Western Europe; and dates from Pech-de-l’Azé, determined by a sophisticated technique called optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), clock in at about 51,000 years ago, “well before our current best evidence for moderns in Europe,” McPherron says.And the bone tools keep coming. Since the new paper went to press, a graduate student working with the team, who was going through material earlier found at Pech-de-l’Azé, found yet another lissoir, McPherron tells ScienceNOW.The team thinks its new study leaves little doubt that Neandertal technical abilities have been underestimated in the past. “At about 50,000 years, the behavior of some Neandertal groups was highly sophisticated, and as sophisticated as early modern human behavior of the same time range elsewhere in Europe,” Soressi says. Indeed, Soressi and her colleagues say, the findings raise an even more intriguing possibility: That modern humans in Europe learned some of their technologies, including the making of fine bone tools, from Neandertals, rather than the other way around.For some defenders of Neandertal abilities, the new discoveries seal the deal. “I think there is no wiggle room for skeptics,” says Francesco d’Errico, an archaeologist at the University of Bordeaux in France. And at least one leading skeptic, archaeologist Harold Dibble of the University of Pennsylvania, says that he finds the new evidence “more convincing.” Dibble, who earlier also worked at Pech-de-l’Azé but was not involved in the current work, says that “the dates of these deposits are quite early and clearly predate the arrival of moderns by too many millennia.”But Jean-Jacques Hublin, an anthropologist also at the Max Planck Institute, is not swayed. He points out that some researchers, including himself, think modern humans were in central Europe by at least 48,000 years ago and that the error margin for the 51,000-year-old dates for Pech-de-l’Azé—plus or minus 2000 years—could still put it in the range of modern human occupation. In that case, Neandertals could have learned to make the bone tools from incoming H. sapiens after all. “These lissoirs were not discovered in layers 91,000 or 73,000 years old, and it would be difficult to argue that they represent an old Neandertal tradition,” he says.Dibble and d’Errico, who disagree on many aspects of Neandertal behavior, both caution against drawing too many conclusions about Neandertal mental abilities from the bone tools alone. “I have a definite problem using technology as a criterion for modernity,” Dibble says. d’Errico agrees: “A bone tool can be very specialized [in its function] and at the same quite simple to make and use,” he says, citing bone toothpicks, which Neandertals also made. “They are not necessarily the expression of an advanced technology and cognition.”last_img read more

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New study destinations

first_imgStrict visa regulations and falling employment opportunities in UK are now prompting Indian students to look towards alternative institutes in Europe.Here is our list of the top emerging study destinations.Between 2000 to 2009, European universities saw the number of Indian students increase from 3,348 to 51,556 with the UK alone,Strict visa regulations and falling employment opportunities in UK are now prompting Indian students to look towards alternative institutes in Europe.Here is our list of the top emerging study destinations.Between 2000 to 2009, European universities saw the number of Indian students increase from 3,348 to 51,556 with the UK alone logging a rise from 3962 to 36,105 students. Today however, strict visa regulations and falling job opportunities in the UK along with an increase in initiatives to attract foreign students by universities on mainland Europe, are prompting many Indians to experiment with new destinations for their higher education. For example, instead of taking the traditional route of completing her studies in England, Judith George, 17, decided to look for course options in Poland. “I wanted to study in Europe but in a country which was both affordable as well as unique.I found out about Poland through an education fair held in my school. The beautiful campuses, interesting programmes and lack of fierce competition immediately prompted me to apply there,” says George, who completed her schooling in Delhi.In the last few years French universities have received nearly double the number of applications from students in India, while Ireland has clocked a 120 per cent increase to date in interest from Indians for higher education opportunities in the country. “While cities like London, Manchester and Birmingham still continue to attract a fair share of students, many Indians are also considering fresh options.Most of them feel that it is easier and cheaper to study on mainland Europe, Scotland or Ireland while getting the same quality of academics and professional exposure,” says Ajay Singh, a Mumbai-based education consultant. So whether it’s to experience a new culture or simply explore the rich academic heritage of the region, there are plenty of new options to choose from in Europe today.advertisementPolandOne of the youngest members of the European Union, Poland serves as a geographical and cultural crossroads between Eastern and Western Europe. With over 1 lakh international students coming to pursue various degrees here, the Polish education system has quickly been expanding over the last few years. The number of higher education institutes in the country has quadrupled in the last ten years.Interestingly, the Polish education system dates back to over 650 years ago. The magnificent Jagiellonian University in Krakow, for example, was founded in the 14th century, and today is recognised as one of the oldest universities in Europe. Similarly the University of Warsaw can trace its roots back to 1795. Today the university has been consistently ranked as one of the top 100 higher education institutes of the world by QS and the University Web Ranking system. “When I visited universities in England, I felt as if I was back in India because of the large number of students from back home. Having to study with such large concentrations of international students was not my idea of higher education. I wanted to be someplace where I could truly experience European culture and history. Poland was a perfect choice.The professors are warm and helpful and universities are not overcrowded. You get time to really enjoy the country and experience a relaxing yet stimulating approach to academics. It is also much cheaper to study here than in other European countries,” says Abhijeet Patel, student from Warsaw University. “My parents were skeptical at first because they didn’t know much about the country. After visiting the university, they too were bowled over. The campus is so picturesque and facilities for students are of top quality.The libraries and architecture in particular are phenomenal both because of their history and design,” he adds. Currently there are over 400 courses offered in English in Poland, many of them at the undergraduate and postgraduate level. Poland’s medical schools, in particular, have been attracting the attention of many international students. “Many students are now looking towards foreign countries to study courses that are difficult to get through in India.Engineering and medicine have both witnessed an increase in interest over the last five years, especially as these programmes are now being taught in English,” adds Singh. The Polish higher education system is generally divided into three levels: the undergraduate level (Licencjat, Inynier), postgraduate level (Magister), and doctorate (Doktor). This system applies to all fields of education in the country except for law, pharmacy, psychology, veterinary medicine, medicine and dentistry, which involve only a two-stage system (postgraduate and doctorate).Top institutes1. Warsaw University,2. Wroclaw University of Technology,3. Jagiellonian University,4. Medical University of Warsaw,5. Wroclaw School of EconomicsAverage cost of living: Euro500 – 600 per monthAverage tuition fees: Euro2000 – 3000 per yearadvertisementFranceWhether its infrastructure, social life, affordability or heritage that you are looking for, French universities have something to offer every international student. Here students are guaranteed to enjoy themselves both inside and outside the classroom. The country’s standing in global rankings reflects its commitment towards education with a total of 35 French universities making it to the 2012-13 edition of the QS World University Rankings; 22 of which were ranked in the top 500. “Universities frequently organise conferences, seminars, field trips, projects and outdoor activities.There really never is a dull day when it comes to living here. Speaking of academics, there is little to complain about either. Professors here are all extremely knowledgeable and always willing to help you gain access to the best resources and infrastructure. They also encourage a lot of independent thinking and never dissuade you from trying your hand at a new topic or sub-discipline,” says Vineet Mehra, 26, a student at Institut Superieur de l’Aeronautique et de l’Espace (ISAE) in Toulouse.Small tutorial sizes and heavy instructor intervention are additional highlights of pursuing your studies here. The smaller class sizes and involved instructors seek to ensure that every student has the time and the attention needed to learn, ask questions and clear their doubts. “It’s common to find students and teachers catching up after lectures are over. It actually helps you perform better as a student when you have such a high level of interaction and engagement with your professors,” he adds.Nuclear, space and aviation programmes in particular are very popular amongst Indians. Those who attend universities in France often do so because of the technology they offer. “The emphasis laid on university infrastructure and resources is admirable. No matter what subject you choose to study, you will be guaranteed the best reading material, lab resources and equipment for your studies. Some institutes even go out of their way to procure special books and journals for their students,” adds Mehra.Other upcoming disciplines include teaching, languages, art, history, medicine and law. Today international students in France also have the chance to study a wide number of courses in English. Universities also offer add-on courses in French for those looking to learn the language alongside their studies. “It’s not compulsory to learn but it will make living here easier. Also, if you want to work in France after your studies, you will need to know the language.Fortunately when you are living here, it is much easier and faster to pick up the language because you always get a chance to practice,” says Mehra. With special Campus France offices across India ready to help students with their applications alongwith a number of attractive scholarship opportunities and visa benefits being extended to Indians, it’s little wonder then that student interest in French institutes has steadily been on the rise.Top institutesl. Ecole Polytechnique,2. Ecole Normale Superieure,3. ParisTech,4. Institut superieur de l’aeronautiqueet de l’espace,5. INSEAD, HEC Paris, Sorbonne UniversityAverage cost of living: Euro1000 – 1200 per monthAverage tuition fees: Euro170 – 2500 per year( Euro3000 – 10,000 for business and management programmes)advertisementIrelandAll it took was one trip to the University College Cork for Sanya Kapoor, 19, to fall in love with Ireland. From the ornate Tudor Gothic quadrangle to the variety of specialisations available in the field of law, Kapoor could think of no better institute to attend for her undergraduate degree. “My only criteria was to study at an institute where my choice of programme was available. But when I visited Cork I realised how important quality of life is as well. From the food to the living conditions to the various extra-curricular opportunities, students here have just about nothing to complain about. You need to have a fun and comfortable life in order to focus on your studies,” she explains. The anticipated growth to over 2,000 students from India in Ireland over the next 18 months, coupled with a dramatic 120% increase in Indian student visa applications last year, is evidence enough that Ireland is rapidly growing its share of the huge Indian education market.This mission coincides with the various Education in Ireland fairs conducted over the last few years in Chennai, Bangalore, New Delhi and Mumbai. These fairs have all focused on promoting the country’s various education qualifications and rich cultural experience amongst prospective students in India. “Ireland’s education institutions are already making a name for themselves in the Indian market, and are successfully building a very strong brand under the Education in Ireland banner.The overall aim is to position Ireland as a quality and respected education destination for Indian students,” explains Kevin Sherry, Enterprise Ireland, Head of International Sales and Partnering. Education in Ireland is the international brand promoted by Enterprise Ireland for the Irish international education sector. Nearly 17 different Irish higher education institutions and colleges attend the fair each year to enhance their links and partnerships with India.”International students have a significant impact on the Irish economy. In the short term they deliver fee income, local expenditure and job creation in Ireland, and in the medium-to-long term, they build strong strategic relationships with future key influencers in India which can deliver major benefits in the form of trade and investment over future years,” says Richard Bruton TD, Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation, Ireland. “On the jobs front, we can anticipate over 650 new jobs on the basis that approximately 13 new jobs are estimated to be created for every 100 international students that come here. These Indian students also play an important role in deepening the business, cultural, education and research ties between India and Ireland,” he adds.Top institutesl. University of Cork,2. Trinity College Dublin,3. University of Limerick,4. Dublin Institute of TechnologyAverage cost of living: Euro800 – 1000 per monthAverage tuition fees: Euro9000 – 20000 per yearScotlandWith a population of around five million, Scotland retains its own, distinctive culture within the UK. The country is famous around the world for its breathtaking Highlands scenery, tartan, whisky and friendly inhabitants. It is also home to a number of cosmopolitan cities, international festivals and a thriving education scene. With 19 universities, Scotland is credited for having more world class institutes per head of population than any other country in the world. Additionally, all these institutes have embedded employability into their learning and teaching strategies.As a result of which graduates from Scottish universities have the highest rate of employment and enjoy high starting salaries six months after graduating than anywhere else in the UK (according to HESA, 2011). Today there are over 4,000 international students at Scottish universities and together they represent 180 different countries. “I was keen to live and study in a country where I felt right at home but at the same time would have exposure to different cultures and people from various walks of life.Scotland was the right choice for me because it offered all this and at the same time I was able to gain admission in a programme and university of my choice,” says Mihir Pathak, 27, a graduate of Edinburgh University. Scots are also quickly making a niche for themselves in the fields of medicine, engineering and science, politics, history, arts and sport.Scotland’s legacy of great innovators includes John Logie Baird, an alumnus of Scotland’s universities, who invented the television and Professor Higgs, who first posited the existence of the Higgs Boson particle while a professor at the University of Edinburgh. Interestingly, Scotland was the first country in the world to introduce universal school education and was one of the first European countries to establish a quality assurance system for its educational institutions. “While universities in Scotland have long been recognised for their excellent academic facilities and quality of research, it’s still taken a while for Indians to realise their potential.This is mostly because access to information used to be limited five or ten years ago. Today there are offices and centres of various Scottish universities in India itself who are available to help students with their applications, living arrangements and visas,” says Pradeep Sra, an education consultant from Delhi. “Many institutions have also tied up with their Indian counterparts for various student and faculty exchanges.This has also helped familiarise students with the various programmes and support available at Scottish universities,” adds Sra. With its significantly lower cost of living than the rest of the UK, strict student safety measures and plans for reintroducing a poststudy work visa for students, this is one country certainly worth checking out for your higher studies.Top Institutesl. Edinburgh University,2. University of Glasgow,3. University of Aberdeen,4. Robert Gordon University,5. Queen Margaret University,6. University of Dundee,7. University of St. AndrewsAverage cost of living: Euro800 – 1000 per monthAverage tuition fees: Euro13000 – 25000 per yearGermanyAfter completing his PhD studies in the UK, Avinash Patel had no doubts about which country he wanted to pursue his post-doctoral studies in. “I really admire both the German passion for research as well as the support given to academics in the country. I knew for a fact that I wasn’t ready to go back to India. Germany was the best choice for me,” says Patel, who is currently a postdoc at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology. “The institute feels like home. You are encouraged to interact and engage with your colleagues and everyone is very approachable.The facilities are of the highest quality. Furthermore, living in Dresden, one of the most picturesque and historic cities in the country, is an additional bonus,” adds Patel. Be it medicine, science, humanities or management, German institutes have a wide variety of programmes to offer international students. Interestingly, both national as well as international students are charged nominal tuition fees at all public universities here. Students and researchers can also apply for scholarships and grants from various German funding organisations such as the German Academic Exchange Service and the DFG, German Research Foundation.”There are some great opportunities for pursuing your higher studies and research here. Institutes do take the application round very seriously. It’s important to find a research group or programme that matches your interest and to demonstrate long term interest in your application,” says Dipthi Somesh, who is pursuing her doctorate from the Berlin Bradenburg School for Regenerative Therapies. The number of foreign students in Germany has doubled since 1995, from 140,000 to 280,000 at the start of the 2013 academic year and that number is only set to increase in the years ahead. “Students are quickly realising the potential of studying in Germany.Not only are the living costs and tuition fees more affordable but the country is also home to some of the best research institutes and universities in the world. Additionally these days one no longer needs to know the native language to study in Germany. There are several programmes that are taught in English,” says Naveen Chopra, Director, Chopra Consultants.Top institutes1. Max Planck Institutes,2. Heidelberg University,3. Free University of Berlin,4. University of Cologne,5. University of Munster,6. Dresden University of Technology,7. University of BonnAverage cost of living: Euro600 – 1000Average tuition fees: Euro200 – 15,000last_img read more

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Cristiano Ronaldo, Alvaro Morata help Real Madrid earn comeback win vs Sporting Lisbon

first_imgLate strikes from Cristiano Ronaldo and Alvaro Morata gave Real Madrid a last-gasp 2-1 win over Sporting Lisbon as the European champions came from behind to win the first game of their Champions League defence.Ronaldo denied his Portuguese boyhood club a famous win by scoring an equaliser from a free-kick in the 89th minute just when it seemed Madrid could, sensationally, lose their opening game in Group F. (Sergio Aguero hat-trick helps Manchester City trounce Moenchengladbach)Morata then headed home deep in injury time to complete the fightback.”We didn’t start the game well but Real Madrid are famous for comebacks like these and we leave here very happy,” said Morata.”We always believed in ourselves and we proved that you can always win a game until the referee blows the final whistle. Football is not always fair but it was fundamental to win and that’s what we’ve done.”SPORTING LISBON TAKES SURPRISE LEADBrazilian Bruno Cesar had earlier given the visitors a surprise yet deserved lead in the 47th minute as he pounced on indecision in the Real back line.Real took their time to respond to going behind with Ronaldo missing a gilt-edged chance to level when he struck the near post from a couple of yards out.Real had gone into the game on top of La Liga after a convincing 5-2 win over Osasuna but met a well-drilled Sporting side who flooded the midfield with bodies and frequently won possession back, launching quick and dangerous breaks.advertisementThe first of these breakaways came early in the game and led to Cesar trying his luck from the edge of the area, firing narrowly wide of Kiko Casilla’s right-hand post.Real struggled to find solutions to Sporting’s strategy and were limited to shots from distance, like one stinging effort from Ronaldo which Rui Patricio tipped over the bar.ZIDANE’S DOUBLE SUBSTITUTIONGareth Bale had looked Real’s liveliest player in the first half but was on the wrong end of a painful challenge from Sebastian Coates, who kneed the Wales international in the midrift.Bale was taken off in the second period along with Karim Benzema, who looked far from peak fitness.Zidane’s double substitution had a tangible impact on the game, however, with Lucas Vazquez giving Real extra energy while Morata added extra power in the area.And it was the local striker’s tenacity that won the points at the death as he leapt to head James Rodriguez’s cross home.last_img read more

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Cricket South Africa postpones T20 Global League

first_imgCricket South Africa’s (CSA) troubled T20 Global League has been postponed to 2018 in an embarrassing climb-down for the organisation which launched the tournament amid great fanfare in London in June.Failure to secure a suitable broadcast package and a title sponsor meant CSA stood to lose about $25 million, representing roughly half of the organisation’s cash reserves.”We have not come to this decision lightly,” acting CSA CEO Thabang Moroe said in a statement on Tuesday.”Having discussed it with all our stakeholders including the franchise owners, we believe that the interest of the league should be our first priority. We have re-assessed our strategy and believe that postponing the first edition of the T20 Global League to next year will serve us well.”A number of top international players had been signed for the 2017 competition, including England one-day captain Eoin Morgan and former England batsman Kevin Pietersen.The six-week tournament, due to feature eight teams, was scheduled to run from Nov. 3-Dec. 16.Former CSA CEO Haroon Lorgat left his job suddenly last month citing a clash with the organisation’s board, widely reported in South African media to be about his role in setting up the T20 Global League.last_img read more

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India vs Australia: Michael Hussey backs Hardik Pandya to play in Melbourne Test

first_imgFormer Australia batsman Michael Hussey on Friday said that conditions for the third Test in Melbourne will be a lot different from those in Perth and India should consider drafting in all-rounder Hardik Pandya to bring balance to their attack.The third Test begins in Melbourne on December 26 and the MCG pitch has come under sharp focus after it hosted a drab draw against England during last year’s Ashes and the ground received a warning from the ICC.”Conditions in Perth were quite unique and in Melbourne conditions will be totally different. I thought the Indian fast bowling unit has bowled beautifully in this series. They bowled a lot of overs in Adelaide and Perth in hot conditions, but had to work hard [for Australian wickets].”He [Pandya] is a bit like Mitchell Marsh, when he is in form. You get an extra bowling option that can take a little load away from the pacers particularly as the four-match series wears on. So this [bowling all-rounder] is something for both sides to look at,” Hussey told PTI.Hussey said bowlers of both sides have really worked hard so far in this series and a lot will depend on how the two attacks recover.India used a four-bowler attack in both the Adelaide and Perth Tests. While they won the first Test by 31 runs with a well-balanced bowling unit, including a spinner, the four-pacer plan backfired in Perth as Australia levelled the series with a 146-run win.Hussey said that India missed Ravichandran Ashwin in Perth while Nathan Lyon bowled his side to victory, but also added that the four-pacer strategy was not totally wrong given the state of the pitch pre-match. Instead, he credited Australia for making good use of best batting conditions on day one.advertisement”Looking at the conditions, you cannot really say anything against it [four pacers]. At the start, you just thought there was plenty in it for the pacers and there were lots of cracks. I just think it was a good toss to win and in the first innings, on day one, the pitch played at its best and enabled Australia to get a decent first innings score. Then, we saw that the score came down as the match went on.”So it was not necessarily what India did wrong. It was just good quality Test cricket in difficult conditions. India certainly missed Ashwin [as the game went on] and this is something for them to look into. Lyon is a quality bowler and he bowled from one end, allowing Tim Paine to rotate his pacers from the other end. India could have done that as well,” Hussey said.The 43-year-old Hussey, who played 79 Tests between 2005 and 2013 with 6235 runs to his kitty, also said that Indian batting was imbalanced with too many tail-enders, and the poor form of their openers was starting to show in contrast with what the Australian openers were able to achieve.He said if the if poor starts of the openers continue, then Cheteshwar Pujara and Ajinkya Rahane need to take on more responsibility to balance the reliance on Virat Kohli.”Day one was the easiest time to bat but the Australian openers did a great job. And they were under pressure as well. Certainly with Aaron Finch, there was a lot of talk whether he should be opening and I thought he played brilliantly. Australia getting off to that 100-run opening partnership certainly did put them in the box seat and a strong position to win the game.”Both the Indian openers are fine players, but they are obviously not getting going. Sometimes it happens and things are not just going your way,” he said.Asked if India were relying too much on the performance of Kohli, Hussey said, “Kohli is the best player in the world, so India do rely on him and that is not wrong. For Australia, when Steve Smith and David Warner were playing, there was a heavy reliance (on them).”For India, Pujara was outstanding in Adelaide, and Rahane is looking good in patches. You always rely on your best batsmen, but in this second Test, with that extra fast bowler the Indian tail was too long and it upset the batting balance,” he said.Also Read | Hardik Pandya takes 5 wickets on Ranji Trophy return Also Read | Hardik Pandya to join Team India in Australia, likely to play Boxing Day TestAlso Read | Hardik Pandya determined to stay in shape for Boxing Day Test vs Australiaadvertisementlast_img read more

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Thousands gambol, cavort, frolic and prance all around Merseyside

first_img Wretched football, erroneous boasts: Sam Allardyce was an Everton misfit Send your letters to the.boss@theguardian.com. And if you’ve nothing better to do you can also tweet The Fiver. Today’s winner of our prizeless letter o’the day is … Rollover.THE RECAPGet the best of Big Website’s coverage sent direct to your inbox every Friday lunchtime (BST). Has the added bonus of being on time. Sign up here.BITS AND BOBSMiddlesbrough defender George Friend has placed the blame for the club’s failure to beat Aston Villa in the Championship play-offs firmly at the door of the side’s attack. “We’ve not scored over the two legs so we can’t expect to go through,” he sniffed.Following Chelsea’s WSL and FA Cup double, Eni Aluko – who played her final game for the club in the title-sealing win at Bristol City – has paid tribute to manager Emma Hayes, 35 weeks pregnant with twins. “Her spirit was here, we Facetimed her as soon as we could and she was in bed, very excited,” cheered Aluko.Thibaut Courtois reckons José Mourinho will have a string of scarves up his FA Cup final suit when Chelsea face Manchester United on Saturday. “He always has surprises up his sleeve,” yelped the goalkeeper.Diego Maradona has signed a three-year contract to be chairman of Dynamo Brest in the Belarusian Premier League.And Saudi Arabia have banned referee Fahad Al Mirdasi from football for life for a match-fixing attempt, weeks before he was due to fly to Russia 2018 and officiate.STILL WANT MORE?Shrewsbury’s Omar Beckles on mental health.Suzanne Wrack on Chelsea’s double. Yes, on Wednesday morning Big Sam was bundled out of the door marked Do One and sent bouncing down the road on the seat of his trousers. He came to a halt on the corner of Gwladys Street and Bullens Road, not far from the stadium’s trade exit, which was just as well as he’d left something in his desk. “You forgot this!” screamed majority shareholder Farhad Moshiri, launching what appeared to be a large tin bucket down the street. As it deflected off Big Sam’s noggin with a dull clank, it became clear in the bright morning sun of a glorious new epoch that it was in fact his personal silver jigger. Sam – whose 24-match interregnum gives Ronald Koeman that Thomas H McIntosh sheen – sighed, upturned the bespoke beverage-measuring device, and sat on it to sulk awhile in the style of Oor Wullie. Help Sam’s boab!“Sam was brought in at a challenging time last season to provide us with some stability and we are grateful to him for doing that,” began a statement later issued by Everton’s incoming chief suit, Professor Denise Barrett-Baxendale MBE, whose stately handle registers an impressive 8.7 on The Fiver’s patented Sir Chips Keswick-o-meter. “However, we have made the decision that, as part of our longer-term plan, we will be appointing a new manager this summer and will be commencing this process immediately.” That process would appear to involve reclaiming the scrunched-up bit of paper from the waste bin with Marco Silva’s name on it, and employing the man they wanted in the first place back in November, if only Watford hadn’t gotten so shirty about it.So in absence of an interesting list of alternative candidates, let’s conclude this story with a roll-call of something else: Butland (Stoke), Pickford (Everton), Pope (Burnley); Jones (Man Utd), Cahill (Chelsea), Walker (Man City), Trippier (Tottenham), Rose (Tottenham), Alexander-Arnold (Liverpool), Young (Man Utd), Stones (Man City), Maguire (Leicester); Dier (Tottenham), Henderson (Liverpool), Delph (Man City), Loftus-Cheek (Chelsea), Morris-Dancing Fiver (Fiver Towers), Lingard (Man Utd), Alli (Tottenham); Kane (Tottenham), Rashford (Man Utd), Vardy (Leicester), Sterling (Man City), Welbeck (Arsenal).CAN’T YOU FEEL A BRAND NEW DAY? (REPRISE) Facebook West Ham target Manuel Pellegrini after David Moyes decides to walk Andy Hunter on Everton.Jonathan Wilson on Big Vase final.Proper Journalism’s David Conn on Swansea.The Knowledge on woodwork.Martin Laurence on Premier League clubs’ best players.Oh, and if it’s your thing … you can follow Big Website on Big Social FaceSpace. And INSTACHAT, TOO!‘THE THING IS, I DON’T EVEN LIKE BOUNTIES THAT MUCH’ The Fiver Facebook Share on Facebook Pinterest Topics Share on WhatsApp Get tapping, please. Photograph: Ross M Horowitz/Getty Images Chelsea celebrate the double. Photograph: Chelsea FC via Getty Images The cull of superannuated British managers continues apace: West Ham have decided against extending the contract of 2005’s David Moyes. As breaking news goes, it’s all a bit meh, given this outcome was pretty much expected back on 7 November, which was the day Moyes was given the job in the first place. Still, he kept them in the Premier League, which is an improvement on his performance at Sunderland. Sigh. It’s a long time since he could be spotted, bronzed and gleaming, swanning down the stairs of the Hotel Maria Cristina, his palatial digs in San Sebastián, isn’t it.Anyway, unlike at Everton, a long list has been cobbled together in search of a successor. And here it is: Manuel Pellegrini, Rafa Benítez, Sean Dyche, David Wagner and Paulo Fonseca of Shakhtar Donetsk. Good luck, Gollivan! Good luck, everyone!RAY WILSON (1934-2018)The rampaging left-back Ray Wilson, one of England’s World Cup winning heroes of 1966, has died at the age of 83. Wilson was the oldest member of the XI that played in the final at 32; it didn’t stop him hoisting Bobby Moore on to his shoulder during the post-match celebrations, captured forever alongside Geoff Hurst and Martin Peters in a tableau that has come to define English football’s greatest day. He won the FA Cup while at Everton, and enjoyed a lengthy spell with Huddersfield, remembered by fans of both clubs as one of their greats. RIP. Share on Messenger Twitter Twitter center_img Facebook Pinterest Football Share on LinkedIn A BRAND NEW DAYUnder normal circumstances, the announcement of the England squad for Russia would be our lead story. But Tranmere have just been promoted back to the Football League, while Liverpool are in the final of Big Cup. So it’s only fair that Evertonians should get the chance to trumpet some good news too. And they finally have some, as thousands gambol, cavort, frolic and prance all around Merseyside, to the tune of A Brand New Day from The Wiz, in celebration of Sam Allardyce’s sacking. Now admittedly England only name a World Cup squad once every four years, while lately Everton have been binning managers at such a lick, they’re in danger of making Mike Walker’s stint look like the era of Harry Catterick. But folk at Goodison have been really suffering for the last five months, give them their moment will you. They deserve this. Read more Read more Share via Email Share on Pinterest Share on Twitter features Pinterest Twitter Reuse this content LIVE ON BIG WEBSITEJoin Scott Murray from 7.45pm BST for hot MBM coverage ofRotherham 2-0 Firewall FC (agg: 4-2) Marseille 1-2 Atlético Madrid in Big Vase final.QUOTE OF THE DAY“The balance of the squad is good, both in terms of its experience, its character and also the positional balance. We have a lot of energy and athleticism in the team, but players that are equally comfortable in possession of the ball” – Gareth Southgate kindly gives us something to refer back to when a knackered-looking, lopsided England are knocked out of the Ethics World Cup having broken all records stretching back to 1930 for misplaced passes.THE FIVEЯYes, it’s our not-singing, not-dancing World Cup Fiver. Out every Thursday lunchtime BST, here’s the latest edition, on VAR.SUPPORT THE GUARDIANProducing the Guardian’s thoughtful, in-depth journalism – the stuff not normally found in this email, obviously – is expensive, but supporting us isn’t. If you value our journalism, please support us by making a one-off or recurring contribution.FIVER LETTERS Ray Wilson, pictured with the World Cup trophy. Photograph: PAlast_img read more

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Volunteer Grants Program

first_imgFunding of $16 million is available to eligible not-for-profit community organisations to assist their volunteers and encourage volunteering.Volunteer Grants 2011 provides funding of between $1,000 and $5,000 to not-for-profit organisations to:Purchase portable, tangible, small equipment items to help volunteers;Contribute to the reimbursement of fuel costs for their volunteers who use their own car to transport others to activities, deliver food and assist people in need;Contribute to the reimbursement of transport costs incurred by volunteers with disability who are unable to drive;Contribute to the costs of training courses and/or undertake background screening checks for volunteers.For more information, please visit the FaHCSIA website:http://fahcsia.gov.au/sa/volunteers/funding/Pages/volunteer_grants2011.aspxlast_img read more

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Michael Carmody, Elite 4-Star Offensive Tackle, Announces Commitment

first_imgA general view of Notre Dame's football stadium.SOUTH BEND, IN – AUGUST 31: A general view of Notre Dame Stadium as the Notre Dame Fighting Irish take on the Temple Owls on August 31, 2013 in South Bend, Indiana. Notre Dame defeated Temple 28-6. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)Michael Carmody, one of the top offensive tackles in the 2020 recruiting class, announced his commitment today.The four-star offensive lineman, ranked the No. 16 player at his position for 2020, has committed to Notre Dame.The 6-foot-6, 285-pound offensive lineman chose the Fighting Irish over Ohio State, Texas A&M, Michigan and Penn State, among other programs.Carmody announced his commitment on Twitter. God. Country. Notre Dame. 🍀 #IrishBoundXX pic.twitter.com/YMghYbzIoj— Michael Carmody (@michaeltcarmody) June 16, 2019Carmody is the No. 134 overall recruit in the 2020 class, per 247Sports’ Composite Rankings.Notre Dame now has 13 commitments in the 2020 class, which is becoming one of the four or five best classes in the country.You can view the Fighting Irish’s full class here.last_img read more

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Algonquin concerned over Canadas first rare earth metal mine plan

first_imgAPTN National NewsThey’re used in everything from light bulbs, to smart phones to the screen you’re watching right now.Rare earth metals are fast becoming one of the world’s most sought after resource.But extracting rare earths from the ground is proving to be anything but environmentally friendly.And with demand increasing, mining companies are casting their eyes around the world to find it, including in Alqonquin territory in northwestern Quebec.APTN’s Tom Fennario has this story.last_img

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BJP govt has taken over all premier institutions Mamata

first_imgKolkata: In an apparent reference to Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s announcement of DRDO’s recent space achievement, Trinamool Congress (TMC) supremo Mamata Banerjee Sunday said the BJP government has taken over all premier institutions in the country. On March 27, the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) successfully conducted Mission Shakti, an anti-satellite missile test, from Dr APJ Abdul Kalam Island launch complex, paving the way for the country to join an elite space club comprising the US, Russia, China with such specialised capability. Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss bank a/c details Opposition parties have slammed the prime minister, saying the BJP government was trying to take credit for the DRDO’s achievement. Claiming that the people’s liberty was at stake under the BJP’s rule, Banerjee said “an atmosphere of fear” was prevailing in the country. “The BJP government has taken control of all premier institutions in the country. People here live in fear. They do not have the right to speak freely under an autocratic government,” the West Bengal chief minister said. Also Read – Tourists to be allowed in J&K from Thursday Earlier, too, the chief minister had taken a jibe at Modi, terming his announcement of the DRDO mission as “yet another limitless drama to reap political benefits” ahead of the Lok Sabha polls. “India’s Mission Programme is world-class for many many years. We are always proud of our scientists, @DRDO_India, other research & space organisations,” she had tweeted, adding that “Modi, as usual, likes to take the credit for everything.” Talking to reporters at the Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose airport here before leaving for Visakhapatnam in Andhra Pradesh to participate in a Telugu Desam Party (TDP) rally, Banerjee said a “dictatorial government” is pulling the strings at the Centre using force and intimidation, “trampling democratic norms”. “Disinvestment has been done in public sector companies. Some workers are not getting salaries. The lives of farmers and labourers are under threat under the current dispensation. “I feel that everyone will come forward, keeping aside their petty interests to collectively vote against the Modi government,” said Banerjee. The CM said she would extend her support to TDP chief Chandrababu Naidu, who pulled out his party of the NDA in March 2018, alleging injustice was being done to Andhra Pradesh by the Narendra Modi government. “I am going to Visakhapatnam at the invitation of Chandrababu Naidu to extend my solidarity and participate in a public meeting,” she said. Giving details of her itinerary, Banerjee said she will visit Cooch Behar in north Bengal on April 4 and Assam the following day to address rallies. In Bengal, Banerjee claimed, she would be holding as many rallies as possible over the course of the next two weeks. “I will address nearly 100 meetings in Bengal,” the Trinamool chief said. Election to 42 Lok Sabha seats in Bengal will be held in seven phases from April 11 to May 19.last_img read more

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Japans new Emperor Naruhito ascends the Chrysanthemum Throne

first_imgTokyo: Japan’s new Emperor Naruhito formally ascended the Chrysanthemum Throne on Wednesday, a day after his father abdicated from the world’s oldest monarchy and ushered in a new imperial era. Naruhito officially became emperor at the stroke of midnight but the process was formalised with a 10-minute ritual on Wednesday morning that was off-limits to female royals — even his wife Masako. It took place on the first day of the new imperial era of Reiwa, meaning “beautiful harmony”, which will last throughout Naruhito’s reign. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince Salman ‘snubbed’ Pak PM Imran, recalled his private jet from US: ReportAt a solemn ceremony in the Imperial Palace’s Room of Pine, the 59-year-old was presented with the items his father Akihito relinquished a day earlier: sacred imperial treasures of a sword and a jewel, as well as the seal of state and his personal imperial seal. The sole woman allowed to attend was the only female member of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s cabinet. Shortly afterwards, joined by Masako and other royals, Naruhito was to address the nation for the first time as its 126th emperor. Also Read – Iraq military admits ‘excessive force’ used in deadly protestsHe will also make a public appearance on Saturday when he will again speak to the people of Japan. But the pomp and ceremony will wait until October 22 when he and Masako will appear in elaborate traditional robes for a ceremony in the palace before parading through the streets of the capital to be congratulated by a host of world leaders and royals. Naruhito will greet his first foreign head of state as emperor later this month, when US President Donald Trump visits Japan to meet the new monarch. The Oxford-educated Naruhito faces the delicate balancing act of continuing his father’s legacy of bringing the monarchy closer to the people while upholding the centuries-old traditions of the Chrysanthemum Throne. Like his popular father Akihito, he has warned of the need to remember World War II “correctly,” without downplaying Japan’s early 20th-century militarism. He has also spoken of the need to modernise the royal family, and vowed when he married Masako — who left behind a promising diplomatic career — to protect her “at any cost”. She has struggled however to adjust to palace life, including being subjected to enormous pressure to produce a male heir, and has suffered stress-induced “adjustment disorder” for much of their marriage. The couple have one child, a 17-year-old daughter called Aiko, who cannot inherit the throne because she is female. In a statement released on her birthday in December, Masako pledged to do her best despite feeling “insecure” about becoming empress. In the candid statement, she said she was recovering and could “perform more duties than before”, crediting the “powerful support” of the public. Naruhito is ascending the throne in a very different Japan to the one his father took over when he became emperor in 1989. Then, Japan ruled the world economically, its technology was the envy of every industrialised nation, and its stock market was at highs unlikely to be matched again. At the height of the bubble, Japanese investors were snapping up paintings like Van Gogh’s “Sunflowers” and US landmarks including the Rockefeller Center in Manhattan as “money was dripping off trees” — in the words of one former banker. But following a “lost decade” after the bubble burst, Japan is still locked in a battle against deflation and sluggish growth while its population ages rapidly and many rural areas suffer from depopulation as young people move to cities. Akihito’s abdication, the first in 200 years, has resulted in an unprecedented 10-day public holiday for the famously hard-working Japanese, with many taking advantage of the break to travel. But despite the holiday exodus, and steady driving rain on Tuesday night, crowds still gathered at Tokyo’s famous Shibuya crossing at the clock struck midnight to welcome the Reiwa era. “The emperor was a good person… He was the symbol of Japan,” said Rika Yamamoto, a 24-year-old company employee sheltering under an umbrella on the crossing. “I hope the new emperor will carry on the kindness the old emperor had.” Political parties across the spectrum also welcomed the new emperor — including the Communist Party, whose official platform considers the monarchy incompatible with democracy.last_img read more

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Nuwan sent on compulsory leave following ICC allegations

Article 2.1.1 – being party to an effort to fix or contrive or to otherwise influence improperly the result, progress, conduct or other aspect of an International match.Article 2.1.4 – directly soliciting, inducing, enticing or encouraging a player to breach Code Article 2.1.1.Article 2.4.4 – failing to disclose to the ICC’s Anti-Corruption Unit full details of any approaches or invitations he received to engage in corrupt conduct under the Code.Zoysa has 14 days from 1 November 2018 to respond to the charges. (Colombo Gazette) The Sri Lanka Cricket board has sent Sri Lanka’s fast bowling coach Nuwan Soyza on compulsory leave after he was charged by the International Cricket Council (ICC) with three counts of breaching the ICC Anti-Corruption Code.The charges are as follows:

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More names linked to treasury bond scam to be revealed

He said that once the list is released the public will be able to find out who else was involved in the scam.Lakshman Yapa Abeywardena said that the public who have been supporting the United National Party (UNP) will begin to withdraw their support once the list is made public. (Colombo Gazette) The Government says more names linked to the Central Bank treasury bond scam will be released soon.United People’s Freedom Alliance (UPFA) Parliamentarian Lakshman Yapa Abeywardena said that the list will be released within a week.

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World Bank names law enforcement expert to fight fraud and corruption

In a statement issued today in Washington DC, the World Bank said it had appointed Maarten de Jong, a Dutch national, as Director of its Department of Institutional Integrity. “I am confident that Mr. de Jong will ably carry out the mission of ensuring rigorous, prompt, and objective investigation of all allegations of fraud or corruption or misconduct either by Bank staff or in Bank-financed projects,” said World Bank President James Wolfensohn. In his new post, Mr. de Jong who is currently Managing Director of the European Institute for Law Enforcement Cooperation (EULEC), will advise senior management on corruption issues, and further develop the Bank’s investigative strategies and procedures, contributing to policy initiatives and programmes that will strengthen the Bank’s anti-fraud and corruption efforts.Since late 1997, the World Bank has undertaken more than 600 specific anti-corruption programs and governance initiatives in 95 borrower countries. According to the Bank, its investigations have so far resulted in a permanent ban of 58 firms and individuals from future Bank-financed contracts. The Bank is the first multilateral development institution to publish on its external web page the names of firms and individuals found to have committed some form of fraud or corruption. read more

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Canadian businesses hope for marketing boost from TIFF celebrity gifting suites

Canadian businesses hope for marketing boost from TIFF celebrity gifting suites Alongside the movies, the red carpets and the press conferences at the Toronto International Film Festival there are the gifting lounges – suites where celebrities sample an array of products and take a few home for themselves, such as this gift bag seen in Toronto, on Sept. 9, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Diana Mehta by Diana Mehta, The Canadian Press Posted Sep 18, 2015 9:34 am MDT Last Updated Sep 18, 2015 at 12:20 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email TORONTO – Alongside the movies, the red carpets and the press conferences at the Toronto International Film Festival there are the gifting lounges — suites where celebrities sample an array of products and take a few home for themselves.The exercise, showering the rich and famous with treats, may seem unnecessary to some, but for the Canadian businesses at the lounges, the venues can be a marketing bonanza.“It’s an opportunity for me to be able to showcase my brand on a global stage,” said Lisa Mattam, founder of Toronto-based skin care line Sahajan, whose products only hit the market two weeks ago.“It provides the opportunity to have celebrities interact with and hopefully fall in love with your brand.”Mattam, whose participation in the Tastemakers Lounge is her first such experience, said a celebrity leaving with a gift bag containing her products may translate into a shout-out on social media, which can make “a significant difference.”The company’s Facebook page now features snapshots of Tom Hardy, “Property Brothers” stars Drew Scott and Jonathan Scott, and “Corner Gas” star Tara Spencer-Nairn posing alongside Mattam’s booth.The impact a celebrity can have on a product’s image can’t be understated, added Nick Sutcliffe, whose Caledon, Ont., company brews a cider called Pommies.“We’re a relatively young company, we don’t have the backing of millions of dollars, we’re family-owned” he said. “If we got the exposure of let’s say Ethan Hawke that likes our cider, it would be a game changer.”Those who put together the lounges emphasize that the venues are about far more than “swag” for the stars.“You really have to understand the platform that you have at your availability here,” said Leesa Butler, co-founder of the Tastemakers Lounge, presented by Rock-it Promotions. “All eyes are on Toronto at this time. Here’s an opportunity to really leverage the awareness.”The lounges are also looking to ensure they give celebrities a boost, said Natasha Koifman, president of NKPR, which puts on the IT Lounge, a venue which attracted the likes of Natalie Portman and Naomi Watts so far this year.“We want to genuinely connect the brand with the celebrity, but also we want them to love it, we want them to have a good time,” she said, adding that at times, a lounge experience could lead to an enduring relationship between a star and a product. Actress Abigail Spencer fell in love with a product from British Columbia-based Saje Natural Wellness and went on to list it amongst her favourite things in a magazine.“It’s the kind of publicity you really can’t buy.”Note to readers: This is a corrected story. A previous version misspelled the company name of Saje Natural Wellness read more

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Nominations open for Teaching Awards

Great students are the result of hard work and great teachers, and Brock wants to recognize those who stand out.The deadline for nominations is fast approaching for two annual teaching awards including the Brock University Award for Excellence in Teaching for Early Career Faculty and the Don Ursino Award for Excellence in the Teaching of Large Classes.The Early Career Faculty award recognizes the contributions to teaching undertaken by a new faculty member who is in the first five years of a tenure-track position.The Don Ursino award recognizes an outstanding teacher who demonstrates commitment to the improvement of student learning in a large class.Submissions for both awards are due November 8. Award details and criteria are available online and hard copy. Nomination packages can be submitted in either electronic format to cpi@brocku.ca or hard copy, Attention: Centre for Pedagogical Innovation (CPI), TH 136.For additional information about teaching awards or the nomination process, contact CPI at 905.688.5550 x 3933 or cpi@brocku.ca. read more

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Ohio State mens hockey swept by Providence off to programworst start

OSU then-sophomore goalie Christian Frey (30) during a game against Omaha on Nov. 8 at the Schottenstein Center. Credit: Lantern File PhotoStarting out the season 0-4 is never a good thing. But trying to find the first win against the defending national champion proved to be a task too tall for the Ohio State men’s hockey team. OSU (0-6) traveled to No. 3 Providence (4-0-1) to take on the Friars for a weekend series and were beaten twice by scores of 2-1 on Friday and 6-4 the following day.In front of a crowd of 3,033 on Friday night — the first time the Buckeyes and the Friars faced off in Rhode Island’s capital city — Providence jumped ahead 15:24 into the first period when senior defenseman Tom Parisi filtered in his first goal of the season assisted by freshman Erik Foley and junior defenseman Anthony Florentino.Florentino found the back of the net himself 6:22 into the middle period to swell the Friar’s lead to 2-0. Senior forward Steven McParland and freshman forward Ryan Tait assisted on the play.Just five minutes later, OSU cut the deficit in half when sophomore forward Matthew Weis scored on the power play.Junior forward David Gust had the assist on the Weis tally. Gust leads the team in points through six games with a goal and five assists.OSU junior netminder Matt Tomkins made 28 saves on 30 shots while the junior guarding the other cage, in Nick Ellis, had 26 saves on 27 shots.The Scarlet and Gray went 1-of-4 with the man advantage, while Providence didn’t score on any of its four opportunities.In the series finale, 2,764 fans checked into Schneider Arena to watch six goals by six different Friars overpower four goals by four different Buckeyes. Providence held a 6-2 lead in the third period following senior forward Mark Jankowski’s third goal of the season at the 6:15 mark, but OSU did try and climb back into it.Weis notched his second lamp-lighter of the weekend with 7:54 left in the game and freshman forward John Wiitala scored his first collegiate goal a mere 31 seconds after that.The two quick tallies were a nice spark for the Buckeyes, but the hole they dug themselves into was too deep to dig out of. OSU, despite taking the loss, outshot Providence 34-32 in the contest.Tomkins and Ellis were again the starters, as Tomkins made 26 stops while Ellis made 30.Penalties cost the Buckeyes dearly in game No. 2. OSU took 10 penalties, three of which were cashed in on by the Friars. Two of the Buckeyes’ goals came via the power play, as OSU went 2-of-6 on the night.Five of OSU’s six losses this season have come by two goals or less. The six losses mark the worst start in program history.The Scarlet and Gray will look for that elusive first win next weekend as they are set to take on Mercyhurst at the Schottenstein Center on Friday and Saturday. Friday’s puck drop is set for 7 p.m. while Saturday’s face-off penciled in to begin at 4 p.m. read more

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Teachers should be able to job share because they work too many

The strategy includes introducing a new one-stop system to make applications easier for would-be teachers.Plans involve helping school leaders to reduce teachers’ workload by stripping away unnecessary tasks such as data entry.Schools will be helped with introducing flexible working practices through a new match-making service for teachers seeking a job-share, with additional incentives to work in challenging schools.Mr Hinds said: “I think teachers work too many hours – aggravated by unnecessary tasks like excessive marking and data entry, spending more than half their time on non-teaching tasks.”But those who choose to become teachers chose to do so to inspire young people, support their development and set them up for a bright future – not stay late in the office filling in a spreadsheet. Talking specifically about job sharing, he said: “What we are keen to do is to find a way for people who don’t have a background together to find a partner to apply for a job with, hence the Match.com terminology.”Speaking to The Guardian, he said: “There’s a lower proportion of both men and women in teaching working part-time than the equivalent proportion in the economy as a whole. For women, it’s 28% in teaching v 40% in the economy as a whole. Why is it? There isn’t a single definitive answer, but I’m confident part of it is cultural.””This ambitious strategy commits to supporting teachers – particularly those at the start of their career – to focus on what actually matters, the pupils in their classrooms.”In a competitive graduate labour market we must continue to ensure that teaching is an attractive profession so we can train and retain the next generation of inspirational teachers.” Teachers work “too many hours” and should be encourage to job-share, according to the Education Secretary, who has unveiled plans to boost numbers in the profession.Damian Hinds has set out measures he hopes will attract – and retain – the next generation of teachers who he says currently have to carry out “unnecessary tasks” as part of their job.The strategy comes after data from a National Association of Headteachers survey suggests that 77% of its school leaders found recruitment a struggle last year.Plans include a new entitlement to a two-year training package and a reduced timetable, backed by at least £130 million a year, the Department for Education said.Bursaries will be reformed to include retention-based payments for those who stay in the profession by staggering additional payments throughout the first years of their career. Mr Hinds said: “I think teachers work too many hours – aggravated by unnecessary tasks like excessive marking and data entry, spending more than half their time on non-teaching tasks.”Credit: Tolga AKMEN / AFP Damian Hinds leaves Downing Street Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

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Farmers 18000 useless horses must be slaughtered to help end crisis

first_imgHorses in worst case scenarios are been dumped out on waste ground cutaway bogs and waste ground, country wide, left to starve or freeze often in an emaciated miserable state. Animal welfare organisations and facilities are at breaking point.The UFA described it as “nothing short of outrageous that the Department of Agriculture through its political heads continues to insist that there is no crisis”.UFA national president Bernie Wall said that the stamping of all horse passports as ‘not fit for human consumption’ is exacerbating and magnifying the horse welfare crisis.Following meetings with UFA members, the association has estimated that there are around 25,000 “useless” horses in Ireland, whose owners are struggling financially to care for them. Due to the ‘unfit for human consumption’ stamp on their horse passports, they cannot bring the horses to be slaughtered and exported to countries where there is a market for horse meat.The UFA believes that up to 18,000 of these horses must be slaughtered in order to bring an end to the crisis. Wall said that he believes a great number of these horses would not have been injected with bute, and so would be fit for human consumption.To determine this, the association suggests that Agriculture Department vets could carry out blood tests “paid for as a once off gesture by the Department”.“We need to find a solution,” said Wall. “I’m sure the owners are quite distressed to do this for their animals.” Wall said that the estimated 25,000 horses are not from the racing industry but instead owned by small breeders, sports people, hunters and others.“This is the first time this section of the horse industry has sought and really needs some help,” said the UFA.Wall is writing to both Coveney and Hayes to ask for a meeting on this issue.Read: Over 3,000 horses seized over welfare concerns last year> AN IRISH FARMERS’ group is refuting the Agriculture Minister’s claims that there is “no major welfare problem” in the horse sector – and calling for the slaughter of 18,000 ‘useless’ horses.The United Farmers Association (UFA) has said today it is “demanding to know” why the Minister for Agriculture Simon Coveney and the junior Minister Tom Hayes “continue to insist in the face of all public and common knowledge that there is no crisis in the Irish horse industry”.MeltdownAccording to the UFA, the small breeders’ section of the industry “is in total melt down”, with an estimated 25,000 horses “with no future, no monitory value, no market and whose owners cannot afford to keep them”.last_img read more