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Chinese soccer fan pedals to Moscow for World Cup final

first_imgLiu’s social media posts on his journey have earned him the criticism of some netizens, because his journey has led to the closure of his restaurant, with his wife and son alone at home. He said he plans to start his business all over again and spend more time with his family after he flies home.“I’m not trying to prove anything to anyone,” he said. “I just want to do it, and I believe I can.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Cavs to make qualifying offer to Rodney Hood BEIJING — Restaurant owner embarks on journey of more than 11,000 km to ‘follow his heart’.On the night Liu Jinsong approached Yueyang in Hunan province, he admits he was a bit scared.ADVERTISEMENT The streetlights were dim and the road hilly and pebbly, with barely visible sections under repair looming here and there as he rode toward his first destination on a marathon mountain bike trip, his figure dwarfed by the trucks and tractors that roared past.Liu, 46, had set out that morning, on April 26, from his hometown in Changsha, the capital of Hunan, bound for Moscow, more than 11,000 kilometres away.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownWhy Moscow? The 2018 FIFA World Cup is being held in Russia, with the final in the capital on July 15, and Liu is a soccer fan.“I’ve always wanted to relate to the World Cup in my own way,” Liu said. “I can always show up in the stadium easily as long as I have money, but that’s not my way.” Cloudy skies over Luzon due to amihan Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Taal victims get help from Kalayaan town Bicol riders extend help to Taal evacuees Jury of 7 men, 5 women selected for Harvey Weinstein rape trial Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Liu fixed his eyes on his bike, bought a year ago but left in a corner because he was busy running his little barbecue restaurant. Cycling to Russia would be difficult, but also fun and unique, he thought.“I’m also a fan of rock music, and my understanding of rock is to follow you heart,” he said. “If I think about doing it, then I will do it. That way my heart remains the same, even if I fail to complete the task.”After three days repairing and preparing his bike, Liu left his business, wife and son behind and hit the road on a drizzly morning, with no prior physical training or route planning. Smiling and motivated, he took pictures in front of his barbecue restaurant and announced his departure on social media.Liu cycled past the Yangtze River and across vast canola plains, but the journey was far tougher than he expected. Five days after setting out he had serious bruises on his thighs and a strained tendon in his left leg, and he had to push his bike some of the time.He reached Beijing on May 8, planning to collect his passport, Russian visa and credit card while taking a brief rest. The two-day break in Beijing, sharing a few drinks with friends, rejuvenated him. He said his body had grown accustomed to long-distance cycling and it would be no problem to stay in the saddle for more than 10 hours at a time.ADVERTISEMENTcenter_img Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew In fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ MOST READ But the adventure beyond Beijing was a journey into the unknown.“I have no idea how and where I’ll stay next or if I will be able to find accommodation or food along the way, but it is these unknown things that make traveling most interesting,” he said.On May 12, Liu ran into heavy rain that later turned into hailstones, forcing him to stop and seek shelter. As the night wore on, his GPS guided him onto a narrow country road, with the nearest hotel 100 km away.A few dogs barked aggressively when he attempted to pitch his tent in a village, so he set it up in a clearing in front of an old temple, falling asleep with the chanting of monks as a lullaby.On day 28, with 3,300 km conquered, Liu reached the China-Russia border at Manzhouli, in the Inner Mongolia autonomous region, and crossed into a foreign country for the first time in his life.Siberia was vast, but not flat, and the rough roads posed a constant risk of punctures to his tires. Wild animals could have been lurking in the primeval forest and valleys, but Liu was too tired to think about the danger.“I’ve lost track of time,” he said. “I never want to stop, I’m just a bit tired and sleepy.”Luckily, the people Liu met on the way greeted him warmly, offsetting Siberia’s chilly winds. He was offered cosy bedrooms more than once by Russian villagers when he was about to pitch his tent in the cold. He was also offered a ride by a truck driver when the road was too bad for cycling in the dark. The time Liu spent with his new Russian friends forged memories as strong as the vodka they offered him.Liu is still heading to Moscow at full speed, averaging 160 km a day. He will make it to Moscow on July 15 if all goes as planned and will see if anyone is kind enough to give him a free ticket to the final.“At this stage watching the World Cup is no longer necessary,” he said. “I will be satisfied just to feel the World Cup vibes.” Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding Tim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown LATEST STORIES Christopher Tolkien, son of Lord of the Rings author, dies aged 95 View commentslast_img read more

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Video ref gets thumbs up on Bundesliga debut

first_imgThe controversial system came under the spotlight in the second-half in Munich when Leverkusen’s Charles Aranguiz pulled Robert Lewandowski’s shoulder to send the striker tumbling.The match referee Tobias Stieler signalled — outlining a television screen with his fingers — that the incident should be reviewed by the video assistant referee, Jochen Drees, who was watching 575km (357 miles) away at the project’s headquarters in Cologne.Drees quickly confirmed the foul verbally to Stieler via a headset and Lewandowski slotted home the resulting penalty to seal Bayern’s 3-1 win after Admir Mehmedi scored Leverkusen’s consolation goal.“I’m glad it worked so well, because what would have happened without the video assistant?” asked Stieler after the final whistle.“I would have returned to the changing room to hear that I had missed an obvious penalty.”The VAR system made its senior international debut at June’s Confederations Cup in Russia, but sparked controversy, receiving a mixed reception from fans after causing long delays and some confusion.It is being further tested in the German league this season before world football’s governing body FIFA decides whether to use it at next year’s World Cup finals in Russia.Behind the scenes, former FIFA referee Hellmut Krug, the German Football Association’s (DFB) referee manager and VAR project manager in Germany, was clearly relieved.“We are satisfied with the opening game,” said Krug.“Our intense preparations have paid off,” he added after the technology behind the system was tested in the Bundesliga last season, but was not made available to referees in the relevant matches.– System glitch –The system got off to a bad start in Germany a fortnight ago, malfunctioning when Bayern beat Borussia Dortmund to win the German Super Cup — the first time it was used for a top level match here — but did not influence the result as Munich won 5-4 on penalties after a 2-2 draw.And things did not go according to plan again when the Hawkeye system, which helps the VAR make offside decisions, failed to work in three Bundesliga matches on Saturday afternoon.In contrast, the VAR’s Bundesliga debut on Friday was a dream for German bosses – as it was a clear foul involving a high-profile player Lewandowski, the league’s top scorer in 2015/16, and there was barely a delay.“The communication between the referee and the video assistant was impeccable. They made a quick and precise decision when evaluating the relevant scenes,” enthused Ansgar Schwenken, the German league’s (DFL) director of football affairs.“This first example of a video decision in the Bundesliga is sure to help the spectators, both at home and in the stadium, understand the decision which will help to accept this new innovation.”The VAR system was only used once on Saturday afternoon when VfB Stuttgart called for a penalty in their 2-0 defeat at Hertha Berlin, but replays showed striker Anastasios Donis was fouled outside the area.Former DFB director of sport Matthias Sammer doubts the system will remove controversial decisions from the game.“I think it was justified,” said the ex-Germany midfielder of the Lewandowski penalty decision.“My belly and my footballer’s heart, however, tells me that there will be many standard situations in the future which will be discussed.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000German referee Tobias Stieler gestures for the video assistant referee to review a decision during the Bundesliga match between Bayern Munich and Bayern Leverkusen on August 18, 2017 © AFP / Guenter SCHIFFMANNBERLIN, Germany, Aug 19 – The historic debut of the video assistant referee in Germany’s top flight got a thumbs up from the relieved match referee after he spotted a penalty in Bayern Munich’s opening win over Bayer Leverkusen.Bayern were 2-0 up at home in Friday’s first game of the new Bundesliga season when the VAR, which is being trialled for the first time in the German league this season, made its first intervention.last_img read more

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More B.C. Firefighters heading to Alberta to help with forest fires

first_imgThe BC Wildfire Service recognizes the importance of sharing firefighting resources given the invaluable assistance that both Alberta and the Yukon provided to B.C. during the last two wildfire seasons, which were the worst in the province’s history. KAMLOOPS, B.C. – The BC Wildfire Service is sending additional personnel to Alberta to help respond to an increasingly challenging wildfire situation.Personnel will also be deployed to the Yukon to assist with an increasing wildfire threat.A total of 137 personnel will be deployed on Monday, June 3, and Tuesday, June 4, 2019, to help where needed throughout Alberta. A total of seven personnel will be deployed to the Yukon on June 2, 2019:- Advertisement -The previous 267 personnel who were sent to Alberta on May 22 and 23, 2019, will be concluding their 19-day deployment and returning to B.C. between June 6 and 8, 2019.The request for assistance was made through the Canadian Interagency Forest Fire Centre, which co-ordinates the mutual sharing of firefighting resources between B.C. and other jurisdictions. The jurisdiction that requested the resources cover all associated costs.Considering the current and forecasted fire situation in British Columbia, sufficient personnel and resources remain in the province to respond appropriately to any fire activity here. Crews can be deployed out of province for up to 19 days but can be recalled at any time.Advertisementlast_img read more

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Leicester in talks with French international defender over possible move

first_img Marseille defender Rod Fanni could join Leicester Marseille right back Rod Fanni is in talks with Leicester City about a move to the Premier League, according to reports in France.Leicester have already made five summer signings this summer and could be about to make their sixth if a move for the French international goes through.According to France Football, the player’s representatives are due to fly to England this week in an attempt to thrash out a deal for the 32-year-old.Fanni’s arrival would add experience to the Foxes’ back line, with the right back boasting 88 appearances for Marseille and five caps for France. 1last_img

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Former Donegal priest jailed for 9 months for sex assaults on girl

first_imgA former Donegal priest who indecently assaulted a young girl has been jailed for nine months.Con Cunningham, who served in a number of parishes across Donegal, had “simulated sex” with a young girl as he drove her to Dublin in his car. The 83 year old with an address at Glen Road, Carrick was sentenced to nine months in prison today at Donegal Circuit Court in Donegal Town.State Prosecutor Patricia McLaughlin had told the court how the former cleric kissed the girl, put his tongue down her throat and pushed her head down to his private parts while they were both clothed, as he sexually assaulted her in his car on a trip to Dublin in the mid-1970s.It later progressed to rubbing her breasts and getting on top of her in his car while both were clothed while making grunting noises and it was clear he was satisfying himself, the victim said.Cunningham pleaded guilty to two counts of indecent assault against the female on dates between January 1, 1976 and December 31, 1976 at a location in Donegal.The defendant also pleading guilty to a similar third count that occurred at an unknown location between Donegal and Dublin on dates between January 1, 1976 and June 30, 1977.He was led away in handcuffs from court to begin his sentence.Former Donegal priest jailed for 9 months for sex assaults on girl was last modified: November 5th, 2018 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Con CunninghamcourtgirlPriestsexlast_img read more

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Football the perfect release from politics for Frank McBrearty

first_imgFrank McBrearty is loving life at Raphoe Town FC – and says its the perfect release from the daily grind of political life. The outspoken and at times controversial public representative is the manager of Donegal Junior League outfit Raphoe Town.McBrearty was a talented sportsman in his teenage years, and was a brilliant boxer and excellent footballer. He played for Kildrum Tigers, Raphoe Town, and Finn Harps reserves, but he left Donegal in the mid 80’s to work in the UK.In London, he played for a number of top junior clubs in the region and has always shared a deep love and passion for football.However, he has now entered the managerial arena – his first gig in senior football, and says he’s relishing the challenge of propelling Raphoe into the Donegal Premier Division. McBrearty has assembled a talented squad that has a good blend of youth and experience, and feels that he could have a team capable of playing Intermediate football in the next couple of years.McBrearty told Donegal Daily, “It’s a great release from politics, it’s a difficult and stressful job, so I’m enjoying the new role.“I coached Raphoe U14’s and U16’s and Drumkeen United in the Donegal Youth League a number of years ago, but this is my first role in senior football.“I was approached by a number of players to take over at Raphoe, and I had worked with a lot of them at underage level, and I was happy to take them up on their offer.“We’ve had a good pre-season and we beat Drumoghill and Lagan Harps, and while we lost our opening league game away to Gweedore Celtic, it’s been an encouraging start.”McBrearty has his own son Frankie marshalling operations in the middle of the park, and the talented midfielder brings bags of experience to the Raphoe side. Frankie Jnr spent a year in Iceland, and was close to signing for Sheffield Wednesday as a teenager – only to see the move fall through at the last minute.He was an integral part of Peter Moran’s Bonagee United team, and is a key player for Raphoe Town.However, McBrearty says he’s got a side stacked with quality and experience and says the depth in his squad gives him confidence that his side can gain promotion.“Frankie has obviously operated at a high level in the past, but Ryan McCullagh is a huge player for us, he’s a top class player and again is vastly experienced at Intermediate level. “We’ve got David Craig who won an USL title at Kildrum, and we’ve also got Jamie Gallagher and Christy Bogle at are disposal who are brilliant players.“But look, it’s a tough, tough league, the two Gweedore sides are going to be hard to beat, Cappry are looking to bounce straight back up, Keadue are a physical side with good players and Donegal Town are also a difficult proposition, so it’s not going to be easy.“The attitude of the players has been first class, training has been excellent, and if the players continue to apply themselves, then we’ll be OK, I’m confident we can get promotion into the Donegal Premier Division.McBrearty says the addition of Shane Dolan to his backroom team as assistant manager has been a massive help to him – and also said he’s been extremely encouraged by the amount of talented young players coming through the youth set-up into his senior side.McBrearty said, “Shane Dolan is my assistant and he’s been a great help to me, he had a fine career in the Donegal League and brings a vast amount of experience to the project.“He’s knows the league inside out and the two of us compliment each other well, and both bring an array of experience and knowledge to the side.“One of the most pleasing aspects for me so far, is how well some of the young lads have performed – they’ve made the transition from youth football into the senior set-up seamlessly and it’s great to see the club producing so many top, top young players.”McBrearty’s side face Deele Harps in a local derby this weekend, and he’s expecting a feisty clash, but hopes his players can focus on their football.“Discipline is a hugely important thing for me as a manager, I don’t tolerate a lack of discipline, when I was boxer if you abused the referee you could be suspended for a year and rightly so.“I won’t accept any of my players getting involved with referees, it’s not on.“Sunday’s game will be tough, it’s a derby and it’s going to be feisty, it’s what you would expect in a derby clash, but I’m hoping my lads keep their heads and focus on playing football, that’s the one thing they can control, and if they do that they hopefully we can get a positive result.”It’s early days under the tenure of McBrearty at Raphoe, but there is an air of optimism around the club that they’re heading in the right trajectory and are making progressive steps in pushing themselves on as a club, and with the charismatic and experienced McBrearty at the helm he may be the man to lead them back to the Donegal Premier Division.Football the perfect release from politics for Frank McBrearty was last modified: September 14th, 2016 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Frank McBreartyManagerialnewsPoliticsRaphoe Town FCSportlast_img read more

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DONEGAL FANS MUST STOP HYPING UP TEAM SAYS MCHUGH AS HE TIPS KERRY TO WIN

first_imgDonegal GAA legend Martin McHugh has tipped Kerry to beat Donegal in this Sunday’s crunch quarter final match at Croke Park.And the Kilcar pundit says Donegal fans have a lot to answer for by building up their team’s chances.Writing in today’s Irish Daily Star newspaper, McHugh says he thinks Kerry have too much for Jim McGuinness’ side “My big fear for Donegal this weekend is the awful hype in the county. Donegal fans need to come down to the level of the players.“If hype is not controlled it’s very dangerous, but I feel the players are level-headed enough to cope with it,” he said.The All Ireland winning star said the present Donegal team are the fittest team ever to leave the county and will do everything they can against Kerry.But he says he still thinks the men from the Kingdom have too much football for his own son Mark and his fellow players. “I tipped Kerry to in the All Ireland form day one as they have the best footballers around.“And I just think that they will have too much for Donegal,” he said. DONEGAL FANS MUST STOP HYPING UP TEAM SAYS MCHUGH AS HE TIPS KERRY TO WIN was last modified: August 2nd, 2012 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:all-irelanddonegalKerryMartin McHughlast_img read more

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IN MEMORY OF GEMMA – RESULTS FROM THE GEMMA McHALE MEMORIAL 5K

first_imgHUNDREDS of people from both sides of the Border took part in a 5k last night in memory of Gemma McHale, the Aghyaran student who died a year ago in a road accident.Gemma, who was 21 and from Crillys Road, died after her Peugeot 306 car crashed on the Letter Road between Belleek and Pettigo on the night of Thursday, May 17 last year.The University of Ulster student was returning home after visiting her sister Joanne in Co Mayo when her car left the road and ended up nose-down in a field adjacent to Letter Bridge. More than 450 people attended the Gemma’s Memorial 5k in Aghyaran.Said Patsy McGonagle from Finn Valley AC: “We want to say thanks to everyone for your support. It makes it so worth while when an event like this gets such great support.“The Mc Hale/Dolan/Jordan families thank you all, with £3571 in so far and counting.”The funds will go to the The Coombe Childrens Hospital Dublin (Neo Natal Unit) where Gemma’s sister Joanne gave birth to twins Jack and Jemma. Here are the results from the race:Place Race No. Time First Name Surname Category Club1 163 16.38 Gerard Gallagher SM Finn Valley A C2 164 17.21 Kieran Carlin SM Finn Valley A C3 31 18.12 Patrick Penrose SM Finn Valley A C 4 176 18.30 Shay Gallagher SM Individual5 229 18.32 Kenny O’Donnell SM Finn Valley A C6 104 19.01 Michael Penrose Snr SM Finn Valley A C7 200 19.07 Clint Doherty SM Individual 8 120 19.11 Gerard Colton SM Finn Valley A C9 172 19.21 Noleen Porter SW Finn Valley A C10 451 19.35 Jack McBride SM Individual11 171 19.45 Tony Gallagher SM Finn Valley A C12 105 19.50 Eugene Gallen SM Individual13 170 19.52 Catherine Dooher SM Finn Valley A C14 181 20.08 Drew Doherty SM Finn Valley A C15 95 20.14 Shaun Boyce SM Individual16 159 20.19 Kieran Callaghan SM Individual17 103 20.24 Michael Penrose Jnr SM Finn Valley A C18 145 20.30 Conrad Kee SM Individual19 190 20.44 Brendan Harper SM Individual20 295 20.45 Eamon Connolly SM Finn Valley A C21 466 20.45 Conor McGonagle SM Finn Valley A C22 198 20.50 Sean Paul Byrne SM Individual23 222 20.57 Sean O’Leary SM Finn Valley A C24 206 21.07 Odhran O’Donnell SM Individual25 376 21.10 Dairmuid McHugh SM Individual26 27 21.11 Clare keenan SW Finn Valley A C27 193 21.23 Sean Cassidy SM Individual28 281 21.31 Ciaran McAlone SM Individual29 117 21.33 Kathleen McNulty SW Finn Valley A C30 113 21.36 Noreen Bonner SW Finn Valley A C31 321 21.37 Jamie Hegarty SM Individual32 221 21.39 Michael Gallagher SM Individual33 338 21.45 Karen Gallagher SW Lifford A C34 337 21.47 Paddy Gallagher SM Lifford A C35 33 21.53 Laura lee Penrose SW Finn Valley A C36 195 21.54 Colm McSorley SM Individual37 375 22.00 Kieran McHugh SM Individual38 386 22.17 Aine McGrath SW Individual39 177 22.19 Barry Gallagher SM Individual40 38 22.23 Jonathan Connolly SM Finn Valley A C41 29 22.25 Eoin Moss SM Finn Valley A C42 165 22.26 Mark Donaghey SM Lifford A C43 341 22.52 Mark Bates SM Individual44 28 23.08 Michelle Hunter SW Finn Valley A C45 54 23.08 James McGuire SM Finn Valley A C46 320 23.18 Duane Long SM Finn Valley A C47 537 23.25 an other SM Individual48 359 23.25 Andrew Dolan SM Individual49 32 23.29 Sean McMenamin SM Finn Valley A C50 100 23.30 Eimear Gallen SW Individual51 37 23.34 Ronan McLaughlin SM Finn Valley A C52 14 23.41 Thomas Gallagher SM Individual53 139 23.42 Samantha Wilkinson SW Finn Valley A C54 538 23.43 an other SW Individual55 210 23.43 Eunan Scanlon SM Individual56 199 23.50 Kieran Coyle SM Individual57 48 23.59 Sinead Kenny SW Finn Valley A C58 504 24.07 An Other SM Individual59 93 24.09 Cahir Moss SM Finn Valley A C60 311 24.10 Eamon McConnell SM Individual61 503 24.10 AN Other SW Individual62 26 24.11 Sharon Hamilton SW Finn Valley A C63 340 24.21 Liam Lynch SM Individual64 463 24.33 Conor Lynch SM Individual65 427 24.33 Dale (leaf) Cather SM Individual66 400 24.43 Iggy Houston SM Finn Valley A C67 398 24.43 Joe McNulty SM Finn Valley A C68 220 24.54 Carl Houston SM Individual69 118 24.57 Margaret Reid SW Finn Valley A C70 55 25.12 Bernie McMenamin SW Finn Valley A C71 533 25.15 an other SM Individual72 162 25.16 Paul Smith SM Individual73 194 25.19 Eamon McKenna SM Individual74 158 25.25 Joe Gallen SM Lifford A C75 372 25.33 Stacey Dolan SW Individual76 385 25.39 Cormac Dolan SM Individual77 219 25.40 Sinead McMenamin SW Individual78 156 25.42 Brendan Martin SM Finn Valley A C79 173 25.43 Caolan McGlinchey SM Finn Valley A C80 125 25.45 Alicia O’Donnell SW Finn Valley A C81 141 25.45 Leona Cronolly SW Individual82 52 25.49 Bernie McGuire SW Finn Valley A C83 108 25.49 Marion Murphy SW Individual84 136 25.50 Nichola McMenamin SW Finn Valley A C85 347 25.57 Bernie Peoples SW Individual86 346 25.58 Malachy Peoples SM Individual87 130 25.59 Raymond Doherty SM Finn Valley A C88 157 26.00 Bernie Martin SW Finn Valley A C89 53 26.01 Caroline Lynch SW Finn Valley A C90 310 26.03 Gaynor Hindley SM Individual91 224 26.03 Shauna McNulty SW Individual92 418 26.03 Gemma McSorley SW Individual93 227 26.05 Olivia Gillian SW Individual94 521 26.10 an other SM Individual95 60 26.21 Frankie Dolan SM Individual96 245 26.26 Chris McLaughlin SM Individual97 215 26.27 Pat Caterson SM Individual98 41 26.29 James Nash SM Finn Valley A C99 129 26.30 Gerardette McLaughlin SW Finn Valley A C100 367 26.32 Fiona Baird SW Individual101 369 26.37 Lucy McMenamin SW Individual102 366 26.46 Emmett Harper SM Individual103 294 26.49 Susan McGoldrick SW Individual104 140 26.56 Margaret Doherty SW Finn Valley A C105 412 27.02 Ronan McHugh SM Individual106 483 27.02 Oisin Lynch SM Individual107 410 27.05 David McHugh SM Individual108 332 27.08 Seamus Gallagher SM Individual109 36 27.09 Emer McLaughlin SW Finn Valley A C110 296 27.10 Claire Danley SW Individual111 312 27.11 Paul Maxwell SM Individual112 447 27.12 Irene McNulty SW Finn Valley A C113 144 27.14 Kevin Devlin SM Individual114 50 27.14 Barry Duffy SM Finn Valley A C115 355 27.15 Joseph Connolly SM Individual116 363 27.16 Clare Teague SW Individual117 24 27.17 Sinead Collins SW Finn Valley A C118 44 27.18 Sharon Duffy SW Finn Valley A C119 23 27.19 Deirdre Collins SW Finn Valley A C120 71 27.21 Paula Jansen SW Finn Valley A C121 174 27.22 Siobhan McGlinchey SW Finn Valley A C122 196 27.27 Melanie Penrose SW Finn Valley A C123 51 27.39 Kevin McHugh SM Finn Valley A C124 204 27.46 Maria McHugh SW Finn Valley A C125 501 27.48 AN Other SW Individual126 243 27.50 Eamon McHugh SM Individual127 42 27.51 Denise Moss SW Finn Valley A C128 122 27.51 Aidy McGuire SM Finn Valley A C129 16 27.57 Aine Cleary SW Individual130 246 27.58 Susan Young SW Individual131 35 27.59 Colleen O Brien SW Finn Valley A C132 225 28.04 Paul Gallagher SM Individual133 323 28.05 Candice Cathers SW Individual134 40 28.07 Hugo McGuire SM Finn Valley A C135 292 28.11 Michaela Morris SW Individual136 291 28.11 Catherine Morris SW Individual137 364 28.14 Martin McHugh SM Individual138 228 28.14 Francessca Patton SW Individual139 362 28.16 Dolores McGlinchey SW Individual140 336 28.27 Marie McDaid SW Individual141 353 28.29 Margaret McConnell SW Individual142 326 28.41 Kellie Meehan SW Individual143 138 28.43 Winnie McNamara SW Finn Valley A C144 450 28.45 Ronnie McBride SM Individual145 123 28.47 Anne Marie Reynolds SW Individual146 226 28.47 Rosemary Monaghan SW Individual147 247 28.51 Aaron Moore SM Individual148 449 28.51 Lisa McGlynn SW Individual149 34 28.52 Marie Gallaher SW Finn Valley A C150 155 28.56 Sharon Carlin SW Individual151 39 28.58 Eithne Browne SW Finn Valley A C152 205 28.58 Paula O’Donnell SW Individual153 133 29.02 Fiona Colreavy SW Individual154 201 29.31 Sheena Sproule SW Finn Valley A C155 102 29.33 Gesilda Connolly Penrose SW Finn Valley A C156 316 29.38 Aaron McGlinchey SM Individual157 333 29.40 Kathleen O’Mahoney SW Individual158 20 29.44 Thomas McHale SM Individual159 121 29.54 Rosemary Boggs SW Lifford A C160 390 30.00 Alana Carlin SW Individual161 25 30.11 Siobhan Byrne SW Finn Valley A C162 526 30.11 an other SW Individual163 527 30.11 an other SM Individual164 550 30.11 an other SW Individual165 389 30.11 Nicola Kee SW Individual166 549 30.11 an other SM Individual167 147 30.26 Caroline Britton SW Finn Valley A C168 175 30.37 Karen Carlin SW Lifford A C169 280 30.44 Grainne McAlone SW Individual170 240 30.44 Claire Kerrigan SM Individual171 3 30.47 Kieran McHale SM Finn Valley A C172 99 31.10 Bridgeen Gallen SW Individual173 556 31.38 an other SW Individual174 555 31.39 an other SM Individual175 394 31.47 Deirdre Browne SW Finn Valley A C176 197 31.55 Donna Curran SW Individual177 218 31.55 Loretta McNulty SW Individual178 134 32.20 Helen Doherty SW Individual179 202 32.23 Martin Dolan SM Finn Valley A C180 115 32.26 Maria Devlin SW Finn Valley A C181 287 32.29 Padraic Dolan SM Individual182 298 32.36 Pat O’Loughlin SM Individual183 300 32.37 Shay Gallagher SM Individual184 203 32.56 Jacinta Dolan SW Finn Valley A C185 216 33.10 Pauline McGoldrick SW Individual186 62 33.12 Darra Dolan SM Individual187 468 33.26 Ben Harper SM Individual188 285 33.27 Chloe Britton SW Individual189 283 33.32 Pearse Goan SM Individual190 303 33.34 Nigel Connolly SM Individual191 401 33.45 Marcus O’Donnell SM Individual192 116 33.45 Martin Anderson SM Finn Valley A C193 214 33.52 John Gallen SM Individual194 5 33.55 Kieran Jordan SM Individual195 178 33.56 Martin McFadden SM Individual196 286 34.00 Garbhan Connolly SM Individual197 324 34.09 June Cathers SW Individual198 47 34.14 Betty Gallen SW Finn Valley A C199 46 34.14 Mary Penrose SW Finn Valley A C200 343 34.41 Manus Crampsie SM Individual201 342 34.50 Rose Crampsie SW Individual202 513 35.04 an other SM Individual203 45 35.20 Teresa Crawford SW Finn Valley A C204 22 35.21 Leanne Lynch SW Individual205 180 35.38 Joan Colhoun SW Lifford A C206 278 35.40 Alicia O’Donnell SW Individual207 96 35.58 Michelle McDaid SW Individual208 182 36.14 Erin Duffy SW Individual209 183 36.14 Charlie Mooney SM Individual210 186 36.20 Tommy Kelly SM Individual211 529 36.44 an other SM Individual212 528 36.49 an other SW Individual213 91 37.12 Roisin Moss SW Finn Valley A C214 313 37.26 Joleen McHugh SW Individual215 98 37.28 Marietta Dolan SW Finn Valley A C216 21 37.29 Michael McHale (JUN) SM Individual217 293 38.00 Eilish McMenamin SW Individual218 207 38.12 Barry McLaughlin SM Individual219 305 38.19 Charlotte Sweeney SW Individual220 304 38.20 Michelle Bradley SW Individual221 317 38.21 Anne Marie Meehan SW Individual222 187 38.34 Alice Kelly SW Individual223 339 38.52 Pat Gallen SM Individual224 399 39.38 Emma Lynch SW Finn Valley A C225 315 39.40 Mary McGlinchey SW Individual226 257 39.40 M Rose SM Individual227 406 39.40 Bronagh Gallen SW Individual228 264 39.40 C Cairns SM Individual229 258 39.40 D Rose SM Individual230 88 40.00 Michaela Griffin SW Individual231 75 40.04 Charlie Griffin SM Finn Valley A C232 334 40.04 Daniel O’Mahoney SM Individual233 335 40.21 Emma O’Mahoney SW Individual234 345 40.21 Delaney McGuire SW Individual235 299 40.22 Philomena O’Loughlin SW Individual236 344 40.22 Maelisa Crampsie SW Individual237 325 40.23 Annetta Coyle SW Individual238 381 40.44 Annette McMenamin SW Individual239 309 40.44 Geraldine Penrose SW Individual240 413 41.03 Sharon McHugh SW Individual241 319 41.03 Fiona Carlin SW Individual242 234 41.30 Angeline McMenamin SW Individual243 289 41.30 Cormac McManus SM Individual244 137 41.30 Edel McManus SW Finn Valley A C245 179 41.30 Joan McHugh SW Lifford A C246 520 41.49 an other SW Individual247 392 41.52 Clodagh Greene SW Individual248 554 41.56 an other SW Individual249 391 42.00 Ciara Carlin SW Individual250 448 42.00 Nicole McNulty SW Finn Valley A C251 81 42.10 Darren Dolan SM Finn Valley A C252 82 42.23 Kevin McLaughlin SM Individual253 415 42.26 Paul Sweeney SM Individual254 387 42.26 Tiernan Byrne SM Individual255 90 42.30 Louise Doherty SW Individual256 86 42.31 Pauline Griffin SW Finn Valley A C257 279 42.36 Mary McHugh SW Individual258 239 42.36 Deirdre McCrory SW Finn Valley A C259 541 42.57 an other SM Individual260 542 42.57 an other SW Individual261 256 42.57 L McCurdy SM Individual262 262 42.57 Jack Boggs SM Individual263 30 43.17 Michelle Moss SW Finn Valley A C264 510 43.17 an other SW Individual265 368 43.27 Seamus Hamilton SM Individual266 248 43.27 Sinead McHugh SW Individual267 420 43.54 Marion McGrath SW Individual268 404 43.54 Briege McNamee SW Individual269 416 43.54 Mary Devenney SW Individual270 417 44.03 Joanne Devenney SW Individual271 146 44.03 Kerrie McDaid SW Individual272 64 44.03 Aine Connolly SW Finn Valley A C273 407 44.10 Charlene Patton SW Individual274 328 44.10 Lucia Kelly SW Individual275 329 44.10 Mary Kelly SW Individual276 67 44.10 Patrica Byrne SW Finn Valley A C277 69 44.10 Colleen Griffin SW Finn Valley A C278 188 44.30 Conor Collins SM Individual279 469 44.30 Cain Harper SM Individual280 402 44.38 Cormac Devine SM Individual281 77 44.39 Michelle McLaughlin SW Finn Valley A C282 80 44.40 Kirsty Dolan SW Finn Valley A C283 552 45.03 an other SW Individual284 551 45.03 an other SM Individual285 518 45.03 an other SW Individual286 517 45.03 an other SM Individual287 524 45.25 an other SW Individual288 110 45.25 Jackie Harvey SW Finn Valley A C289 109 45.25 Maeve McGrath SW Finn Valley A C290 58 45.25 Mathew Maxwell SM Individual291 284 45.25 Damien Goan SM Individual292 464 45.25 Bernie Hamilton SW Individual293 235 45.25 Helen McLaughlin SW Individual294 465 45.25 Mary Hamilton SW Individual295 153 45.40 Kathleen Anderson SW Finn Valley A C296 306 45.40 Betty Colton SW Individual297 403 45.40 Caroline Devine SW Individual298 330 45.40 Cathy Travers SW Individual299 152 45.40 Deirdre O’Shea Byrne SW Finn Valley A C300 395 46.00 Louis Browne SM Finn Valley A C301 396 46.00 Caoimhe Browne SW Finn Valley A C302 370 46.11 Caroline McHugh SW Individual303 371 46.11 Jonathan McHugh SM Individual304 373 46.11 Caoife McHugh SW Individual305 374 46.15 Ciaran McHugh SM Individual306 458 46.15 Roisin McSorley SW Individual307 460 46.15 Caitriona McSorley SW Individual308 238 46.15 Eamon McGarvey SM Individual309 253 46.15 Ryan Camble SM Individual310 379 46.15 Marion McHugh SW Individual311 87 46.27 Bridget Shields SW Finn Valley A C312 66 46.42 Jenny Foley SW Finn Valley A C313 154 46.46 Mairiosa Byrne SW Finn Valley A C314 230 46.54 Edel Cassidy SW Individual315 63 46.54 Stephanie Dolan SW Individual316 388 47.07 Denis Dolan SM Individual317 365 47.07 Collette McHugh SW Individual318 314 47.07 Pearse Bradley SM Individual319 378 47.07 Lauren Harper SW Individual320 169 47.07 Dolores Crowe SW Individual321 168 47.07 Heather Montgomery SW Individual322 167 47.21 Rene Montgomery SW Individual323 350 47.21 Patricia Leonard SW Individual324 166 47.21 Claire Montgomery SW Individual325 1 47.50 Dierdre Connolly SW Individual326 405 47.50 Michelle Lynch SW Individual327 327 47.50 Anita McGrath SW Individual328 357 48.17 Elaine Lynch SW Individual329 356 48.17 Gemma Connolly SW Individual330 358 48.17 Sharon Browne SW Individual331 540 48.22 an other SW Individual332 539 48.22 an other SM Individual333 534 48.30 an other SW Individual334 536 48.30 an other SW Individual335 217 48.33 Dessie Ramsey SM Individual336 242 48.33 Bob Glackin SM Individual337 244 48.33 Seamus Byrne SM Individual338 419 49.02 Mary McSorley SW Individual339 462 49.02 Maureen Orr SW Individual340 223 49.23 Peter Lynch SM Individual341 12 49.26 Conal Gallagher SM Individual342 351 49.26 Margaret Dolan SW Individual343 191 49.26 Caolan Harper SM Individual344 189 49.26 Matthew Collins SM Individual345 213 49.26 Ollie Doherty SM Individual346 560 49.26 an other SW Individual347 251 49.26 N Love SM Individual348 261 49.48 M Cairns SM Individual349 255 50.02 T Brennan SM Individual350 546 50.02 an other SW Individual351 547 50.06 an other SM Individual352 250 50.06 T McElwee SM Individual353 249 50.06 D Rock M Rock SM Individual354 249 50.06 bvguhg uhygyi SW Individual355 266 50.06 John Campbell SM Individual356 267 50.06 Sean McGinley SM Individual357 331 50.06 Margaret Lynch SW Individual358 297 50.06 Dympna Lynch SW Individual359 57 50.06 Amanda Duffy SW Finn Valley A C360 56 50.06 Teresa McMenamin SW Finn Valley A C361 553 50.15 an other SM Individual362 525 50.15 an other SM Individual363 514 50.20 an other SW Individual364 425 50.20 Vera Harvey SW Individual365 426 50.20 Sean Harvey SM Individual366 397 50.20 Gerard McMenamin SM Individual367 361 50.32 Rosanna Penrose SW Individual368 545 50.32 an other SM Individual369 509 50.39 an other SM Individual370 290 50.39 Brenda Morris SW Individual371 360 50.39 Sean Penrose SM Individual372 484 50.39 Aine O’Donnell SW Individual373 531 51.00 an other SM Individual374 532 51.00 an other SW Individual375 252 51.00 A Mullan SM Individual376 254 51.00 Paddy O’Kane SM Individual377 272 51.00 Mickey Brennan SM Individual378 184 51.00 Gleanoir Kelly SW Individual379 185 51.00 Olivia Kelly SW Individual380 318 51.14 Ann Marie Lynch SW Individual381 508 51.14 an other SW Individual382 411 51.14 Niamh McHugh SW Individual383 558 51.19 an other SW Individual384 559 51.19 an other SM Individual385 212 51.23 Aoife Doherty SW Individual386 535 51.23 an other SM Individual387 76 51.23 Carmel Dolan SW Finn Valley A C388 348 51.31 Tracey Peoples SW Individual389 502 51.31 AN other SM Individual390 516 51.31 an other SW Individual391 557 51.35 an other SM Individual392 409 51.38 John Rushe SM Individual393 408 51.38 Collette Rushe SW Individual394 414 51.38 Eamon Sweeney SM Individual395 127 51.38 Marie Monaghan SW Finn Valley A C396 519 51.38 an other SM Individual397 522 51.42 an other SW Individual398 523 51.42 an other SM Individual399 393 51.42 Caoimhe Browne SW Finn Valley A C400 43 51.42 Marie Moss SW Finn Valley A C401 383 51.46 Rosemary McSorley SW Individual402 382 51.46 Sadie McSorley SW Individual403 467 52.00 Karen Harper SW Individual404 470 52.00 Eimear Harper SW Individual405 457 52.00 Louise Quinn SW Individual406 515 52.00 an other SM Individual407 349 52.00 Karen Peoples SW Individual408 377 52.07 Claire O’Donnell SW Individual409 422 52.07 Briege Speer SW Individual410 421 52.16 Chris Speer SM Individual411 424 52.16 Adel Speer SW Individual412 512 52.16 an other SW Individual413 192 53.10 Sally Byrne SW Individual414 92 53.10 Marie Moss SW Finn Valley A C415 260 53.10 J Brennan SM Individual416 263 53.23 M Donnelly SM Individual417 265 53.23 B Duddy SM Individual418 18 53.23 Michael McHale SM Individual419 308 54.13 Clara Doherty SW Individual420 456 54.13 Gordon Speer SM Individual421 511 54.13 an other SM Individual422 461 54.13 Avril Speer SW Individual423 288 54.30 Margaret Collins SW Individual424 208 54.30 Jim McLaughlin SM Individual425 209 54.35 Bernie McLaughlin SW Individual426 429 54.35 May Dolan SW Individual427 428 55.00 Betty Dolan SW Individual428 276 55.00 Isobel O’Donnell SW Individual429 259 55.17 S O’Neil SM Individual430 270 55.30 T O’Neill SM Individual431 384 55.30 Mary McCrory SW Individual432 277 55.50 Elizabeth Connolly SW Individual433 273 55.50 Theresa McCrory SW Individual434 274 56.44 Natasha McCrory SW Individual435 269 56.44 Julie Gallagher SW Individual436 268 56.44 Carmel Coune SW Individual437 543 56.44 an other SM Individual438 544 56.44 an other SW Individual439 459 56.44 Geraldine McSorley SW Individual440 423 56.44 Maureen Moss SW Individual441 2 56.44 Siobhan McHale SW Individual442 15 56.44 Ciara Kane SW Individual443 4 56.44 Joanne Jordan/Mc Hale SW Individual444 453 57.18 Ann Dolan SW Individual445 452 57.18 Mary McMenamin SW Individual446 13 57.39 Margaret Gallagher SW Individual447 237 57.39 Mary McHugh SW Individual448 236 58.00 Kathleen Leegan SW Individual449 59 58.00 Dermot Dolan SM Individual450 548 67.54 an other SW Individual451 561 67.55 M McDevitt SM IndividualTotal Runners: 451IN MEMORY OF GEMMA – RESULTS FROM THE GEMMA McHALE MEMORIAL 5K was last modified: May 11th, 2013 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:IN MEMORY OF GEMMA – RESULTS FROM THE GEMMA McHALE MEMORIAL 5Klast_img read more

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KCCA FC draws Namibia’s African Stars in CAF Champions League

first_imgKCCA FC are the reigning champions of the StarTimes Uganda Premier League. (PHOTOS/File)KCCA FC have been drawn to face Namibian Champions, African Stars in the CAF Champions League preliminary qualifying round.This was confirmed on Sunday, July 20th 2019, when the qualifying draws were announced.The Kasasiros won the ticket to represent Uganda in Africa’s premier club competition following their StarTimes Uganda Premier triumph in the 2018/19 season.KCCA who won the CECAFA Kagame cup on the same Sunday, will play the first leg away from home.It was also confirmed that the first leg will be played between 9th and 11th August at the Sam Nujoma Stadium in Windhoek, Zambia.The second leg will then take place in Kampala, between the 23th and 25th of the same month (August).The winner between KCCA FC and African Stars will take on the winner of the tie between Metlama of Comoros and Angola’s Petro de Luanda in the first round of the qualifiers.The dates for the first round have also been confirmed with the first leg happening between the 13th and 15th of September while the return leg will take place between 27th and 29th of the same month.From there, the winners will qualify to the group stages of the 2019/2020 CAF Champions League.At the draws conducted on Sunday, only three teams were given a bye into the first round. The threw in question are DR Congo’s TP Mazembe, Wydad Casablanca of Morocco and Tunisia’s Esperance de Tunis.Esperance are one of the three teams that have recieved a by to the first round of the qualifiers.The winner of the 2018/19 competition is yet to be determined as Esperance and Wydad Casablanca will face off in the final later this month.Last year, Uganda was represented by Vipers SC who fell to Morocco’s CS Constantine in the first round of qualifying.Initially, the Venoms had eliminated El Merrikh in the preliminaries.For KCCA FC, they were in the CAF Confederations Cup where they fell at the playoff roundThe Kasasiros took care of Tanzania’s Mtibwa Suger in the first round before losing 2-3 to AS Otoho of Congo in the playoff.KCCA FC were the last Ugandan club to reach the group stages of the CAF Champions League. They achieved that fate in 2017/2018.Comments Tags: African StarsAS OtohoCAF Champions LeagueCAF Confederations Cup 2018/19CS ConstantineEsperance de TunisKCCA FCMike MutebiMtibwa SugerStarTimes Uganda Premier LeaguetopTP Mazembevipers scWydad Casablancalast_img read more

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Fatty Acid Synthesis: A Machine with “High Degree of Architectural Complexity”

first_imgAs Bruce Alberts said in 1998, the biology of the future was going to be the study of molecular machines: “the entire cell can be viewed as a factory that contains an elaborate network of interlocking assembly lines, each of which is composed of a set of large protein machines.”1  One of those machines is like a mini-factory in itself.  It’s called fatty acid synthase (FAS).  Three Yale researchers just published the most detailed description of this machine in the journal Cell.2  (cf. last year’s headline, 03/06/2006).  They remarked that its most striking feature is the “high degree of architectural complexity” – some 48 active sites, complete with moving parts, in a particle 27 billionths of a meter high and 23 billionths of a meter wide.    Despite our aversion to fat, fatty acids are essential to life.  It’s when fat production goes awry that you can become fat.  The authors explain:Fatty acids are key components of the cell, and their synthesis is essential for all organisms except archaea.  They are major constituents of cellular membranes and are used for posttranslational protein modifications that are functionally important.  Saturated fatty acids are the main stores of chemical energy in organisms.  Deregulation of fatty acid synthesis affects many cellular functions and may result in aberrant mitosis, cancer, and obesity.The chemical steps for building fatty acids appear in the simplest cells and remain essentially unchanged up to the most complex organisms, although the machinery differs widely between plants, animals and bacteria.  In plants, for instance, the steps are performed by separate enzymes.  In animals, a two-part machine does the work.  Which organism has one of the most elaborate fatty-acid machines of all?  The surprising answer: fungi.  The researchers imaged the fatty acid synthase enzymes of yeast and, despite their academic restraint, were clearly excited as the details came into focus:Perhaps the most striking feature of fungal FAS is its high degree of architectural complexity, in which 48 functional centers exist in a single … particle.  Detailed structural information is essential for delineating how this complex particle coordinates the reactions involved in many steps of synthesis of fatty acids…. The six alpha subunits form a central wheel in the assembly, and the beta subunits form domes on the top and bottom of the wheel, creating six reaction chambers within which each ACP can reach the six active sites through surprisingly modest movements.  This structure now provides a complete framework for understanding the structural basis of this macromolecular machine’s important function.Calling it an “elegant mechanism,” they proudly unveiled a new model that tells the secret inside: a swinging arm delivers parts to eight different reaction centers in a precise sequence.    Their dazzling color diagrams are, unfortunately, copyrighted inside a technical journal, but a Google image search shows one reasonable facsimile of the overall shape at a Swiss website: click here.  Some of the protein parts provide structural support for the delicate moving parts inside.  Taking the structure apart, it looks something like a wagon wheel with tetrahedron-shaped hubcaps above and below.  Picture a horizontal wagon wheel with three spokes, bisecting the equator of the structure.  Now put the hubcaps over the top and bottom axles.  The interior gets divided up into six compartments (“reaction chambers”) where the magic takes place.    In each reaction chamber, eight active sites are positioned on the walls at widely separated angles from the center.  Spaced nearly equidistant between them all is a pivot point, and attached to it by a hinge is a lever arm.  This lever arm, called ACP, is just the right length to reach all of the reaction sites.  From a tunnel on the exterior, the first component arrives and is fastened to the ACP arm (priming).  The arm then swings over to another active site to pick up the next part, then cycles through the next six reaction sites that each do their part to add ingredients to the growing fatty acid chain (elongation).  The machine cycles through the elongation step multiple times, adding carbons to the growing fatty acid.  When the chain reaches its proper length (16-18 carbons, depending on the fatty acid needed), it is sent to a final active site that stops the cycle (termination) and delivers the product through an exit channel to the cytoplasm.    The ACP hinged arm, then, is the key to the system.  Imagine a life-size automated factory with a roughly spherical interior.  Its task is to build a chain of parts in a precise order.  The first ingredient comes through a shaft and is attached to the robotic arm in the center.  The arm then follows a pre-programmed sequence that holds out the product to eight different machines on the walls that add their part to the product.  The final operation of the arm delivers the product to an exit channel.  In a cell, though, how does this arm actually move?  The answer: electricity.    Yes, folks, yeast cells contain actual electrical machines.  Don’t visualize wires of flowing current; instead, picture active sites with concentrations of positive and negative charges in precise amounts.  How does the lever arm use this electrical system?  Owing to the specific kinds of amino acids used, each active site has a net positive charge, while the ACP lever arm has a negative charge.  Each time a part is added to the product, it changes the overall charge distribution and makes the arm swing over to the next position.  Thus, a blind structure made out of amino acids follows a cyclic pattern that builds up a specific product molecule one carbon at a time, and automatically delivers it when complete.  After delivery, the system is automatically reset for the next round.  Clearly, the precision of charge on each active site is critical to the function of the machine.3, 4    Now that we have described one reaction chamber, step back and see that the yeast FAS machine has six such chambers working independently and simultaneously.  Another surprise is that the lever arm inside must be activated from the outside during assembly of the machine by a structure (PPT) on the exterior wall before it can work.  There’s a reason for this, too:The crystal structure of yeast FAS reveals that this large, macromolecular assembly functions as a six-chambered reactor for fatty acid synthesis.  Each of the six chambers functions independently and has in its chamber wall all of the catalytic units required for fatty acid priming, elongation, and termination, while one substrate-shuttling component, ACP, is located inside each chamber and functions like a swinging arm.  Surprisingly, however, the step at which the reactor is activated must occur before the complete assembly of the particle since the PPT domain that attaches the pantetheine arm to ACP lies outside the assembly, inaccessible to ACP that lies inside.  Remarkably, the architectural complexity of the FAS particle results in the simplicity of the reaction mechanisms for fatty acid synthesis in fungi.Maybe the activation step is a quality-control step, to ensure the system doesn’t cause trouble in the cytoplasm before the machinery is completely assembled.    The authors did not mention how fast the synthesis takes place.  But if it’s anything like the other machinery in the cell, you can bet the FAS machine cranks out its products swiftly and efficiently, and life goes on, one molecule at a time.  Baking a cake with yeast will never seem the same again.1See 01/09/2002 for citation.2Lomakin, Xiong and Steitz, “The Crystal Structure of Yeast Fatty Acid Synthase, a Cellular Machine with Eight Active Sites Working Together,” Cell, Volume 129, Issue 2, 20 April 2007, Pages 319-332.3In addition to electrical charges, some amino acids have side chains that attract or repel water.  These hydrophilic and hydrophobic side chains also contribute to the force fields that cause the conformational changes in the enzyme.4The diagrams in the paper show the details of each active site.  To the uninitiated, enzyme models appear like random balls of putty stuck together, but humans should not impose their propensity for straight lines and angles on the world of molecules.  The shape and folds of the structure are critical to the function because they control the charge distribution in the vicinity.  The active sites are recessed within tunnels.  The ACP lever arm tip is guided by charge into these tunnels where ingredients are “snapped on” to the molecule through precise chemical reactions.  Each reaction changes the charge distribution, leading to the next stage of the cycle.Reading this paper was almost a transcendent experience.  To imagine this level of precision and master-controlled processing on a level this small, cannot help but induce a profound sense of wonder and awe.  Here, all this time, this machine has been helping to keep living things functioning and we didn’t even know the details till now.  How would such revelations have affected the history of ideas?    The authors did not say a peep about evolution except to note five times that certain parts are “conserved” (unevolved).  They also assumed evolution (without evidence) in one astonishing reaction to the fact that certain folds in the protein parts of this machine are unique in nature: listen – “They consequentially represent new folds and may have evolved independently to tether and orient the multiple active centers of fungal FAS for efficient catalysis.”  OK, everyone, a collective rotten-tomato toss for that enlightened suggestion.    Remember that origin-of-life researchers are stumbling and fumbling trying to get even single amino acids to form (04/04/2007), let alone get them to join up in useful, functioning chains (see online book).    The fatty acids are useless without the amino acids, and vice versa (09/03/2004).  Even if some kind of metabolic cycle were to be envisioned under semi-realistic conditions, how did this elaborate machine, composed of amino acids with precise charge distributions, arise?  It’s not just the machine, it’s the blueprints and construction process that must be explained.  What blind process led to the precise placement of active sites that process their inputs in a programmed sequence?  What put them into a structure with shared walls where six reaction chambers can work independently?  All this complexity, involving thousands of precision amino acids in FAS (2.6 million atomic mass units) has to be coded in DNA, then built by the formidably complex translation process, then assembled together in the right order, or FAS won’t work.  But the storage, retrieval, translation and construction systems all need the fatty acids, too, or they won’t work.    We are witnessing an interdependent system of mind-boggling complexity that defies any explanation besides intelligent design.  Yes, Bruce Alberts, “as it turns out, we can walk and we can talk because the chemistry that makes life possible is much more elaborate and sophisticated than anything we students had ever considered.”  We have tended to “vastly underestimate the sophistication of many of these remarkable devices.”    Yeast.  Who could have ever imagined this simple little blob possessed a high degree of architectural complexity and robotic technology.  Many questions remain.  Why do plants and animals have different mechanisms, but the same chemical steps?  Why do fungi, of all things, have the most elaborate architectures?  Are the other architectures equally complex in their own ways?  What other factories regulate this one, and how does this factory regulate other downstream systems?  We have much more to learn about fatty acid synthesis, but the “biology of the future” – design biology – is shedding far more light than Darwin’s myths ever did.  The fact that life functions so well, from yeast to human, should spur us on to uncover the design principles that make it all come together as a finely tuned system, in a finely tuned world, in a finely tuned universe.(Visited 31 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more