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Huawei certain Messi will lead global take-over

first_imgBARCELONA, Spain:Having sold over 100 million smart phones last year, Chinese-based cell phone giants Huawei remains confident its partnership with Lionel Messi will now lead its organisation to the top of global phone sales soon. Messi is a five-time Ballon d’Or/FIFA World Player of the year winner and as the first player to achieve that historic feat, many consider him one of the all time football greats.Messi, who represents Spanish club Barcelona was recently named global brand ambassador for Huawei during a press conference held in the city.With Messi being born in Rosario Argentina in the same year as Huawei’s inception in 1987, the organisation has labelled the partnership as a “perfect fit”.long-term partnership”We are seeking a long term partnership. He is a win-win, look to see Huawei and Messi in the future,” Kevin Ho, president, Handset Business, Huawei Consumer BG said.The Messi and Huawei partnership is over a three year period, but no official figure was released on how much it will cost the Asian brand.Huawei is also the official Smart phone partner of London-based English football club Arsenal. It is set to launch their new P9 smart phone in London on April 6.Despite Huawei’s global sales last year, it remains one of the three top smart phone vendors in the world, behind Apple and Samsung.They, however, lead the Asian market by beating Xiaomi, Lenovo, Apple and Samsung to become the top smart phone vendor.The company hopes Messi can help raise its brand awareness in markets it has been making inroads in like Latin America, Asia and Europe where football enjoys a cult-like following.Meanwhile, according to Ho, five reasons which make Huawei devices stand out from others are, “design, craftsmanship, user experience, long battery life and excellent camera quality”.He stressed that Huawei is happy to be a sponsor of the Digicel Rising Star in Jamaica.last_img read more

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CAAE-Ebola Massive Awareness Campaign Ends in Lofa

first_imgA massive awareness and sensitization campaign against the deadly Ebola virus under the banner of Citizens Action Against Ebola (CAAE) has  ended in seven administrative districts in Lofa County.However, initial preparations for the Ebola virus awareness and sensitization activities were characterized by some serious challenges and constraints that ranged from financial and logistical constraints in Monrovia and the various districts of Lofa County.The Ebola virus awareness and sensitization initiatives were carried out during the height of the medical crisis for almost six weeks by volunteers of the CAAE’s leadership in Lofa County.Historically, CAAE-Lofa Focus was organized to respond to emergency situations in all parts of Lofa County.During the month-long Ebola virus awareness, the CAAE-LF leadership and its dedicated volunteers were able to distribute dozens of anti-Ebola materials in highly entrenched cultural and religious communities.In addition, during the awareness activities, community residents and citizens were taught the uses of the different kinds of anti-Ebola hygiene and sanitation materials in all the seven administrative districts in Lofa County.Besides, during the Ebola awareness encounters with the weary citizens and residents of Lofa County, the CAAE-LF leadership was able to partner with the Ministry of Health and the medical authorities provided some technical and logistical assistance.The CAAE-LF was also able to secure minimum funding from the Lofa County administration and other locally based non-governmental organizations in some of the administrative districts.The CAAE-LF leadership told the Daily Observer in Monrovia that most of the funds generated came from their personal pockets and other generous prominent citizens, residents and well-meaning Liberians associated with the group.“We worked under very difficulties circumstances and with scarce resources in all the seven districts owing to the fact that our primary goal was  to eradicate this deadly disease that really killed many of our good citizens and residents in our county,” CAAE-LF Chairman Daniel Mulbah indicated.In a related development, in order for the CAAE-LF group to be able to carry out other sustained Ebola awareness during the post-Ebola period, the group has sounded an SOS appeal to all Lofa citizens and residents to contribute funds and materials for the pending proposed process.The group also explained that the post-Ebola challenges and constraints are so enormous to the extent that it would require lot of financial support to help citizens and residents to resettle in their socio-economic and agricultural undertakings.The CAAE-LF has also underscored the urgent need for consideration by Lofa citizens, residents and other Liberians residing at home and abroad to contribute whatever they can for the post-Ebola challenges among Lofa citizens.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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United States EPA, Enbridge reach settlement over 2010 oil spills

first_imgThe governments complaint was that Enbridge did not act quickly enough when the incidents occurred.Advertisement Those measures are:•           Implement an enhanced pipeline inspection and spill prevention program•           Implement enhanced measures to improve leak detection and control room operations•           Commit to additional leak detection and spill prevention requirements for a portion of Enbridge’s Line 5 that crosses the Straits of Mackinac in Michigan.Advertisement “The government’s complaint alleges that Enbridge owned or operated a 30 inch-pipeline, known as Line 6B, that ruptured near Marshall on July 25, 2010, discharging oil into the environment. Although the Line 6B rupture triggered numerous alarms in Enbridge’s control room, Enbridge failed to recognize a pipeline had ruptured until at least 17 hours later. In the meantime, Enbridge had restarted Line 6B on two separate occasions on July 26, 2010, pumping additional oil into the ruptured pipeline causing additional discharges of oil into the environment. Ultimately, Line 6B discharged at least 20,082 barrels of crude oil, much of which entered Talmadge Creek and flowed into the Kalamazoo River which flows to Lake Michigan. Flooding caused by heavy rains pushed the discharged oil over the river’s banks into its flood plains, and accelerated its migration over 35 miles downstream before it was contained. Enbridge later replaced Line 6B, which originates in Griffith, Ind., crosses the lower peninsula of Michigan and ends in Sarnia, Canada, with a new, larger pipeline, also known as Line 6B. The rupture and discharges were caused by stress corrosion cracking on the pipeline, control room misinterpretations and other problems, and pervasive organization failures at Enbridge.The complaint also alleges that on September 9, 2010, another Enbridge pipeline, known as Line 6A, discharged at least 6,427 barrels of oil which Romeoville, Ill., much of which flowed through a drainage ditch into a retention pond in Romeoville.”Cynthia Giles, Assistant Administrator for EPA’s Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance says this settlement will make sure these incidents do not happen again in the future.“This agreement puts in place advanced leak detection and monitoring requirements to make sure a disaster like this one doesn’t happen again. This comprehensive program – including an independent third party to audit compliance – will protect our waterways and the people who depend on them.” •           Create and maintain an integrated database for its Lakehead Pipeline System•           Enhance its emergency spill response preparedness programs by conducting four emergency spill response exercises to test and practice Enbridge’s response to a major inland oil spill•           Improve training and coordination with state and local emergency responders by requiring incident command system training for employees, provide training to local responders, participate in area response planning and organize response exercises•           Hire an independent third party to assist with review of implementation of the requirements in the settlement agreement WASHINGTON, D.C. – Enbridge and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have reached an agreement regarding 2 oil spills back in 2010.The oil spills happened in Marshall, Michigan and Romeoville, Illinois.Under the settlement, Enbridge has agreed to pay at least $110 million in measures “to prevent spills and improve operations across nearly 2,000 miles of its pipeline system in the Great Lakes region.”- Advertisement -Enbridge will also be paying fines of $62 million for Clean Water Act violations and $61 million for million for spilling at least 20,082 barrels of oil in Marshall and $1 million for discharging at least 6,427 barrels of oil in Romeoville. They will also be paying $5.4 million in non-reimbursed costs that were paid by the government to cleanup the Marshall spill, they will also pay any costs that occur from that spill in the future.In a statement, the EPA says Enbridge must also now adhere to strict guidelines.“Today’s settlement includes an extensive set of specific requirements to prevent spills and enhance leak detection capabilities throughout Enbridge’s Lakehead pipeline system – a network of 14 pipelines spanning nearly 2,000 miles across seven states. Enbridge must also take major actions to improve its spill preparedness and emergency response programs. Under the settlement, Enbridge is also required to replace close to 300 miles of one of its pipelines, after obtaining all necessary approvals. Enbridge’s Lakehead System delivers approximately 1.7 million barrels of oil in the United States each day.”Advertisementlast_img read more

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West Ham duo deserve England call, says Slaven Bilic

first_img1 Mark Noble Slaven Bilic says West Ham duo Aaron Cresswell and Mark Noble should be playing for England.Neither of the Hammers pair have been capped by the Three Lions and look unlikely to be included in Roy Hodgson’s squad for Euro 2016.But Bilic claims left-back Cresswell and midfielder Noble have been as good as any players in their respective positions this season and deserve international recognition.“I was manager of a national team for six years,” said former Croatia boss Bilic. “People would say this and that from the other clubs, and I didn’t mind it, but I don’t like to interfere like that.“But what I can say is that I haven’t seen many midfielders who are having a better season than Mark Noble is having.“And it’s not only Mark Noble. I haven’t seen a better left-back than Aaron Cresswell. So they should at least be mentioned.”Noble will lead West Ham out against Norwich at Carrow Road for his 24th Premier League start of the campaign.The Hammers, who won a thrilling FA Cup replay against Liverpool after extra time on Tuesday night, will be looking to get their European push back on track following last week’s defeat at Southampton.Norwich, by contrast, have lost their last five matches to slip into the relegation zone.West Ham lost three key players – Winston Reid, Joey O’Brien and Cheikhou Kouyate – to injuries against the Reds and are still without James Tomkins, Manuel Lanzini and Diafra Sakho.Bilic said: “It’s a big blow but I think we are going to put a strong team out. We have enough players.“We lost our last league game at Southampton and we have a good game to bounce back.“To stay up there we need to get something out of the game. Norwich lost five in a row but five games ago they were in a good situation.“They had a good transfer window. They are fighting and they need a result like crazy so I expect a tough game. But we are confident and if we play like we did against Liverpool we will have a good chance.”last_img read more

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DONEGAL SFC: BRAVE NAOMH MUIRE GIVE NAOMH CONAILL A FRIGHT

first_imgPaul ‘The Yank’ Boyle was sent off as Naomh Muire were narrowly defeated on their return to the Donegal SFC against Naomh Conaill.Naomh Muire returned to senior championship action for the first time since 2000 and gave a great account of themselves pushing Naomh Conaill all the way in their Donegal SFC clash at The Banks. Naomh Muire won the Intermediate championship last season and in doing so ensured a return to senior championship football.However, Naomh Conaill were expected to power past the challenge of the men from the Lower Rosses, but that didn’t materialize as a young Naomh Muire side delivered an accomplished performance. Naomh Conaill in truth were glad to hear the final whistle in the end up as 14 man Naomh Muire rallied late on with a succession of scores.In what was an absolutely bruising championship game, scores were hard to come by in the opening half.Dara White scored a couple of lovely points in the opening period, but a spate of points from Dermot Molloy and Dara Gallagher gave Naomh Conaill a three point advantage at the break.Half time score Naomh Muire 0-03 Naomh Conaill 0-06 The second-half followed a similar theme to the first, it was physical, and there were bruising challenges exchanged by both sides all over the pitch.However, Naomh Muire were dealt a hammer blow ten minutes into the second-half when Paul ‘The Yank’ Boyle was sent off.The talismanic captain is a crucial player for Naomh Muire, and Naomh Conaill used that one man advantage to stretch their lead out to six midway through the second half.Naomh Conaill looked like they would cruise to victory, but a spirited fight-back from Naomh Muire almost earned them a draw.Two cracking scores from Padraig McCafferty reduced the deficit to four 0-12 to 0-08. Then scores from Shaun ‘The Yank’ Boyle and Harry Harden reduced the arrears to just two with a few minutes left.Naomh Muire continued to put Naomh Conaill on the back foot, but the Glenties men showed their experience at this level, and just managed to get over the line.They’ll be delighted with the win, but they were made to fight for it by a spirited, well-organised and determined Naomh Muire side.Final score – Naomh Muire 0-10 Naomh Conaill 0-12 Next up for Naomh Muire is St. Eunans in O’Donnell Park, but they’ll look forward to that challenge after proving they can hold their own with the best in the Donegal SFC.Naomh Conaill now face Malin in their next Donegal SFC fixture next weekend.DONEGAL SFC: BRAVE NAOMH MUIRE GIVE NAOMH CONAILL A FRIGHT was last modified: September 27th, 2014 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Donegal SFCNaomh ConaillNAOMH MUIREnewsSportlast_img read more

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Man City respond to claims they hid millions to avoid breaking FFP rules

first_imgA year later, Der Spiegel claims, the club had to fill a £9.9million hole in their budget to meet FFP’s ‘break even’ requirement because of severance payments to sacked manager Roberto Mancini.The club’s solution, according to the German magazine, was to get three of its main backers – investment firm Aabar, the Abu Dhabi tourism authority and airline Etihad – to make up-front payments totalling £7.5million for increases in their sponsorship deals.And in a series of emails quoted from by Der Spiegel, dated between 2010 and 2015, club directors appear to state that Sheikh Mansour is the real source of a large chunk of the money that is purportedly flowing to East Manchester from Aabar, the tourism authority, Etihad and telecoms firm Etisalat.Der Spiegel’s report referred to an internal email which it says was sent by director Simon Pearce, who is quoted as saying that Aabar’s contribution is £3million, with £12million coming from “alternative sources provided by His Highness”.In December 2013, Pearce is reported by the German magazine to have written in an internal email that Etihad’s contribution “remains constant at 8m” despite it being officially listed at £35million.Der Spiegel reports that by 2015, the “supplement” had grown to a staggering £59.5million, according to an email it claims to have seen from City’s chief financial officer Jorge Chumillas. 3 Manchester City broke a host of records as they won the Premier League title last season – but could a transfer ban halt their period of dominance? City said at the time the original magazine article was published that they would not be commenting and that the attempt to damage their reputation was “organised and clear”.On Monday, Der Spiegel published a new article on what it alleges are City’s attempts to deceive UEFA by channelling millions of pounds of their owner Sheikh Mansour’s immense wealth into the club via their Abu Dhabi-based sponsors.City repeated the statement they issued last week, defending their position and referring to “out of context materials purportedly hacked or stolen from City Football Group and Manchester City personnel and associated people”.The club are likely to face more questions throughout the week.Citing emails between City bosses that it claims to have obtained, Der Spiegel alleges that Sheikh Mansour, a senior member of Abu Dhabi’s royal family, has been topping up City’s already lucrative sponsorship deals with Emirati companies with his own money – which if true would be a clear breach of FFP’s rules against “related parties” pumping cash into clubs.According to the emails, Sheikh Mansour had “supplemented” City’s “Abu Dhabi partnership deals” by £149.5million by the time the club won the first of three Premier League titles under his ownership in 2012. City recently celebrated the 10-year anniversary of Sheikh Mansour’s takeover Manchester City have again defended themselves from accusations they have tried to cheat Financial Fair Play rules, by hiding millions of pounds of owner Sheikh Mansour’s private fortune from their books.Last week, German magazine Der Spiegel published a story which claimed the Premier League champions struck a secret deal with European football’s governing body UEFA in 2014 to avoid a potential Champions League ban for breaching FFP regulations.center_img Manchester City owner Sheikh Mansour 3 3 A spokesperson for Etihad denied the airline was not the real source of the money it paid to City.“The airline’s financial obligations, associated with the partnership of the club and the broader City Football Group, have always been, and remain, the sole liability and responsibility of Etihad Airways,” the statement said.“This is reflected in the airline’s audited accounts. Our partnership with Manchester City and the broader City Football Group continues to deliver important ongoing and accumulative returns on our investments.”The second part of Der Spiegel’s series was released on Tuesday and alleged that City set up a project group to circumvent FFP rules. City responded to Der Spiegel with the statement issued last week.UEFA said it “cannot comment on specific cases due to confidentiality obligations” but the governing body is certain to come under pressure in the coming weeks to reopen its FFP investigation into City’s finances.last_img read more

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CATHAL’S GAA BLOG: DONEGAL KINGS DEFEAT STUDENTS FROM QUEEN’S

first_imgCATHAL Mac Suibhne’s Donegal GAA Blog: Dún na nGall Kings Defeat Students From QueensAnother win recorded for Donegal tonight in Ballybofey against Queens University and whatever about the epitaphs of this year’s McKenna Cup as regards qualification and the blooding of players, Jim McGuinness can look back on a tournament where he’s trebled his win rate. He again picked a strong side for this encounter with the Belfast students; the Neils, McGee and Gallagher, in from the start after seeing second half action in Armagh on Sunday.The team knew a big score was essential if they were to have any chance of a semi-final spot and Michael Murphy and Colm McFadden didn’t waste time in getting scores on the board. Donegal ran incessantly at the Queens defence and drew plenty of frees in the process. It can be taken for granted at times but it is such a huge advantage the team possesses in having two of the games deadliest free-takers; and better again having one on either side of the field.The hosts registered 1-7 in the first half including another thunderbolt of a goal from Murphy, this time from even further out than his effort against Tyrone in O’Donnell Park. The students managed to net two goals in the opening period and that is something that won’t please McGuinness or indeed Damian Diver, who was brought on board this year for his expertise in defence. Moments into the second half Ryan Rafferty bagged his third goal of the night for the visitors.It became fairly clear early on that Monaghan were going to have things much their own way against Fermanagh and in turn pip Donegal to the best runner-up spot – Tyrone, Derry and Cavan all qualified safely as group winners.Jim again used his bench at half time with Rory Kavanagh, David Walsh and the returning Christy Toye entering the fray; Christy hadn’t pulled on a Donegal jersey since that wonderful day sixteen months ago in the All-Ireland Final. He also endured a long spell away from the action from 2009 to 2011 with an Achilles problem so unfortunately the St Michael’s man is no stranger to long injury lay-offs; hopefully he’ll get a good run at training over the next few months as he always does a job for his side and is a key member of the squad. Murphy got things going again for his team after the resumption, this time a point off his ‘weaker’ left foot – that is if there is anything weak in his repertoire. This of course was Michael’s first McKenna Cup campaign for Donegal in a number of years having previously been tied to playing with his college, DCU. He looks as sharp as ever and if he can keep this form and fitness up it should be another big year for the maestro.Stephen McLaughlin saw some more action tonight after making a brief cameo at the Atheltic Grounds at the weekend and he got his name on the score sheet with a point midway through the second period. That just leaves Kilybegs’ Hugh McFadden as the last of newcomers to the panel who has yet to see some action so expect him to be given a run at some stage in league.The black card was much talked about prior to the McKenna Cup but it didn’t have as big an impact as many had anticipated; it did rear its head more conspicuously in tonight’s game though with students receiving their marching orders and having to be replaced.Donegal made a good fist of things in the second half as regards racking up a high score, finishing with 3-17; with Monaghan though posting 2-20 in Brewster Park and having a superior points difference coming into tonight, they were always in the driving seat and they go on to meet Cavan this weekend; Tyrone and Derry make up the semi-final quartet.The one worry on the night was a knock picked up by Rory Kavanagh; we don’t have the strongest of panels but this is especially true around midfield – Kavanagh and Gallagher fully fit are a must for Donegal so that will certainly be a headache for the management team if it turns out to be anything more than just a knock. So pre-season is done with and next up its National League and O’Moore Park in Portlaoise is the first port of call for green and gold supporters. In theory at least the players should hit the ground running in the league and be well in contention having got some game time into the legs in the last ten days. While undoubtedly Division One is a higher standard, once you go beneath the top three or four teams the rest are on a par with those in the second tier so there’s no such thing as easy games.Winning the league is a realistic target for McGuinness but it will be anything but straight forward. It worked well in 2011, when we last played in Division Two, losing just one game out of eight and getting better and better as the Championship went on after that. There’ll be no such luxuries available this year – Derry in Celtic Park in our Ulster Championship opener will be a huge challenge and the team must be firing on all cylinders for that.That tough fixture makes the league even more important; despite getting relegated with the draw against eventual All-Ireland winners Dublin in the last game last season, McGuinness’ men played well that day and it set them up for the battle against Tyrone a few weeks later; and no doubt Jim will be hoping that an appearance on league final day in Croke Park in April could set the boys up nicely for Derry.CATHAL’S GAA BLOG: DONEGAL KINGS DEFEAT STUDENTS FROM QUEEN’S was last modified: January 16th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:CATHAL’S GAA BLOG: DONEGAL KINGS DEFEAT STUDENTS FROM QUEEN’Slast_img read more

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Donegal League clubs, members warned over social media remarks

first_imgThe Donegal League has said it will take disciplinary action against members who are posting what they have referred to as ‘inappropriate’ and ‘unacceptable’ comments on social media.Clubs had previously been warned about their members’ social media activities.However, at the weekend, all clubs were sent a fresh reminder by the League. The League Executive has become concerned that some registered Donegal League players have posted ‘inappropriate comments regarding recent matches and discipline matters’.The league advised clubs to inform players and members that they face the wrath of the League’s Disciplinary Committee should they be found to bring the game into disrepute with their comments.Donegal League clubs, members warned over social media remarks was last modified: April 30th, 2018 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Donegal Leaguesocial medialast_img read more

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Stargazer UV Neon Hair Gel : ABSOLUTELY AMAZING!

first_imgI used this on my dark haired daughter when she dressed up for school as an oompa loompa and even on her dark hair this was very bright green. I probably wouldn’t recommend this if you have longer hair, it worked in that it turned my hair green but it didn’t look great. Having said that if you have shorter hair i think it would do the trick perfectly. Great for joker costume, washed out easily, it did get into my shirt collar quite a bit, but washed out fine. Brilliant for my sons oompa loompa costume.So much better than sprayAmazing colour. Great if you want to change your hair colour.ABSOLUTELY AMAZING!Stargazer UV Neon Hair Gel, RedStargazer Neon Hair GelUV ReactiveEasy to Apply ApplicatorEasily Removed with ShampooPerfect for Clubs, Parties and Festivals Does the job very well, vibrant colour and washes out easily. (but don’t get caught out in the rain). I find this is very sticky, does not brush out well, i know it’s a gel colour but i have used gels before to keep my hair in place, brushes out easy. It’s very easy to apply and remove. Highly recommendedplease be aware that after a while of continuous usage, it will make your hair go stiff. If you found this review helpful, please tick the helpful box below. I used this on my beard along with baubles for an xmas party. I was looking for something that could be washed quickly and this ticked the box and performed perfectly. I managed to apply without issue and it lasted well. 5 stars for the fact that one tube managed to actually cover my dark, past-shoulder length hair. I only did the top layer, so not all my hair was pink, but it was enough. Be aware that a) the pink will transfer easily from your hair to anything else, and b) the gel dries slightly hard. A fair trade off for the colour you get though, at least for me. It colours the hair so well. It’s so bright and easy to use. The delivery was extremely fast as well. I had serious doubts as i have very long and thick hair but this gel thing was insanely easy to apply, i could even style my hair with it. It dried in no time and it looked so so good. Does exactly what it says on the tin. It doesn’t go very far if you are applying it relatively liberally, but seems to be very reactive to uv. I was using the product in a recent production with uv lighting and the result was fantastic. My daughter got this for her hair. It lasts a surprisingly long time and gives a good neon effect. It washes out easily afterwards. Used this for my joker costume. I could not believe the results. I’m no make up artist and never coloured hair, yet everyone thought ingot it done by someone who knows what theybare doing. Got loads of compliments through out the night on the hair. People could not believe it was only coloured gel. Was slightly concerned about it coming out, but was pleasantly surprise, that it came out easily with just normal shampoo after 2 washes. Would highly recommend and will definitely use it again. Never found anything this good. Usually neon temporary hair products come out significantly better on blonde/light hair than on dark hair. But this product works so well on all hair colours. Easy to apply, however we found applying it using the brush nozzle straightened out the curls in our hair and made it set straight. And it is very chalky, so it would be difficult to style hair after applying this. Other than that, it’s amazing. Easy to apply, stayed on all night. Hair goes a bit stiff, but that’s to be expected. I have blonde, thin hair, but it washed out easily with no color left. Kids love these, nice and bright and wash out easily. Only downside is they dry stiff and flake everywhere if you brush your hair. Well this stuff is amazinga few tips – use gloves to apply. It’s does wash off but it’s easier with gloves. Once you’ve put it on, brush through, style and try not to touch your hair lots. It will come off on your hand. After you’ve applied, use a little hair serum to smooth it as it looks a but frizzy – or maybe that’s just my hair:). I got loads of compliments just wearing a little in strands through my hair. I’m off to buy more colours?. Bright and colourful on my pony’s mane for a festive competition. Omg this stuff is sooooo green. Bought for my son to be the hulk, it was perfect. Easy to apply, didnt come off, rub off on anything. It is the brightest green you can imagine.Washed out easily with shampoo and no risidual colouration. Worked really well in dark hair, great stuff for fancy dress. SummaryReviewer Nathalie DuboisReview Date2018-05-05 18:30:56Reviewed Item Stargazer UV Neon Hair Gel, RedRating 5.0 / 5  stars, based on  104  reviewsPrice£3.29last_img read more

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Part one: A virologist’s tale of Africa’s first encounter with Ebola

first_imgPeter Piot grew up in Belgium dreaming of exotic adventures and helping the poor. He saw medicine as the passport to both goals. But at one point in his medical education, Piot recalls in his 2012 memoir No Time to Lose, a professor offered a bit of advice:“There’s no future in infectious diseases,” he stated flatly, in a tone that bore no argument. “They’ve all been solved.” But I wanted to go to Africa. I wanted to help save the world. And it seemed to me that infectious disease might be just the ticket and full of unresolved scientific questions. So I ignored him.Piot would become one of the world’s most respected epidemiologists because of his work on the viruses that cause AIDS and Ebola—he is a former under secretary-general of the United Nations, former president of the International AIDS Society, and now director of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. In part one of this edited excerpt from his memoir, Piot describes how he and colleagues, with what now seem crude and risky methods, became co-discoverers of the deadly virus now on the rampage again.A Blue Flask of VirusesAll this work was done with no more precautions than if we had been handling a routine case of salmonella or tuberculosis. It never occurred to us that something far more rare and much more powerful might have just entered our lives.On the last Tuesday in September 1976 my boss at the microbiology lab was alerted that a special package was on its way to us from Zaire. It was flying in from Kinshasa: samples of blood from an unusual epidemic that seemed to be stirring in the distant Équateur region, along the river Congo.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Nothing quite like this had happened in the two years I had so far been working in a junior position at a lab at the Prince Leopold Institute of Tropical Medicine in Antwerp, Belgium. But I knew it was part of the job. We sometimes took in strange samples of bodily fluids and tried to work out what they were. Our lab was certified to diagnose all kinds of diseases, including arbovirus infections like yellow fever, and the working hypothesis for this epidemic was reported to be “yellow fever with hemorrhagic manifestations.”I never actually worked with any suspected yellow fever. It wasn’t every day we received samples from as far away as equatorial Zaire. And it was clear this was an unusual sample, and that something pretty curious had occurred, because several Belgian nuns apparently died of the disease even though their vaccinations were completely up to date.The next day—September 29—the package arrived: a cheap plastic thermos flask, shiny and blue. I settled down with Guido Van DerGroen—a shy, funny, fellow Belgian aged about thirty, a few years older than I—and René Delgadillo, a Bolivian postdoc student, to open it up on the lab bench. Nowadays it makes me wince just to think of it. Sure, we were wearing latex gloves—our boss insisted on gloves in the lab but we used no other precautions, no suits or masks of any kind.We didn’t even imagine the risk we were taking. Indeed, shipping those blood samples in a simple thermos, without any kind of precautions, was an incredibly perilous act. Maybe the world was a simpler, more innocent place in those days, or maybe it was just a lot more reckless.Unscrewing the thermos, we found a soup of half-melted ice: it was clear that subzero temperatures had not been constantly maintained. And the thermos itself had taken a few knocks, too. One of the test tubes was intact, but there were pieces of a broken tube—its lethal content now mixed up with the ice water—as well as a handwritten note, whose ink had partially bled away into the icy wet.It was from Dr. Jacques Courteille, a Belgian physician who worked at the Clinique Ngaliema in Kinshasa. He described the thermos’s contents as two vials, each containing 5 milliliters of clotted blood from a Flemish nun who was too ill to be evacuated out of Zaire. (Once a Belgian colony known as the Belgian Congo, the country was named Zaire in 1971, before being renamed the “Democratic Republic of Congo” in 1997.) She was suffering from a mysterious epidemic that had so far evaded identification, possibly yellow fever.I was still trying to find my way in the labyrinth of infectious diseases research, and this kind of thing made my heart beat faster. Guido and René picked out the one remaining test tube of blood from the thermos and set to work. We needed to look for antibodies against the yellow fever virus, and other causes of hemorrhagic or epidemic fever such as typhoid. To isolate any virus material, we injected small amounts of the blood samples into VERO cells, an easily replicable cell lineage that is used a lot in labs. We also injected some into the brains of adult mice and newborn baby mice. (I never liked this aspect of the work. Sometimes we needed to inject patient tissue into the testicles of rats, to isolate Mycobacterium ulcerans, the cause of Buruli ulcers, and it made me cringe.)All this work was done with no more precautions than if we had been handling a routine case of salmonella or tuberculosis. It never occurred to us that something far more rare and much more powerful might have just entered our lives.In the next few days, the antibody tests for yellow fever, Lassa fever, and several other candidates all came up negative, and it seemed likely that the samples had been fatally damaged by their transportation at a semi-thawed temperature. We bustled nervously around the mice and checked our cell cultures four times a day instead of two. On the weekend, each of us popped in to check the samples. All of us,I think, were hoping something would grow.Then it happened. On Monday morning, October 4, we found that several adult mice had died. Three days later all the baby mice had also died—a sign that a pathogenic virus was probably present in the blood samples that we had used to inoculate them.By this time our boss, Professor Stefaan Pattyn, had also gleaned a little more information about the epidemic in Zaire. It seemed to be centered on a village called Yambuku, where there was a mission outpost run by Flemish nuns—the Sisters of the Sacred Heart of Our Lady of s’Gravenwezel. (S’Gravenwezel is a small town north of Antwerp.) The epidemic had been raging for three weeks, since September 5, and at least 200 people had died. Although two Zairean doctors who had been to the region had diagnosed the malady yellow fever, the patients suffered violent hemorrhagic symptoms, including extensive bleeding from the anal passage, nose, and mouth as well as high fever, headache, and vomiting.Hemorrhagic manifestations are quite unusual in yellow fever. Although Pattyn could be a bit of a bully, he was hardworking and knew his stuff. He had worked in Zaire for six or seven years, and exotic viral illnesses were right up his alley, though his specialty was mycobacteria—tuberculosis and leprosy. I recall him telling us that this had to be that strange and lethal phenomenon: a hemorrhagic fever.I was just a recently graduated physician; none of the rare hemorrhagic fevers had ever crossed my path. Nor had they featured at all during my medical training. So I made a quick run to the institute’s library to try to absorb as much as I could. It was a small but diverse group of viruses, from mosquito-borne dengue to exotic, recently discovered rodent-borne South American viruses with names like Junin and Machupo. All, by definition, caused high fevers and massive bleeding, and their fatality rate was often in excess of 30 percent.Previously I had been excited about the work we were doing; now I was inflamed. If we were hunting for signs of a hemorrhagic virus, this was outbreak investigation of the most stirring variety. I truly loved the detective thrill of working in infectious disease. You came in and figured out what the problem was. And if you managed to figure it out quickly enough—before the patient died, basically—then you could almost always solve it, because, just like my medical school professor of social medicine had said, solutions had by this time been found for almost every kind of infectious illness.On September 30, the Flemish nun who was the source of the original blood samples died in Dr. Courteille’s clinic in Kinshasa. He sent us some fragments of her liver for pathologic examination. (Again, the samples were flown to Belgium on a passenger aircraft.) To add to the diagnostic confusion, microscopic examination of the samples showed swollen “Councilman bodies”—lesions considered typical of yellow fever. However, as Pattyn knew, they may also feature in Lassa virus, an African hemorrhagic fever whose transmission by rats is either gastrointestinal or respiratory. So although Pattyn’s hypothesis that the samples from Kinshasa contained a hemorrhagic virus was not confirmed, it was not disproven either.By this point for him to keep us working on those samples was sheer folly; he knew we were not equipped to do the work in safety. In 1974 there were only three labs outside the Soviet Union that could handle hemorrhagic viruses: Fort Detrick, a military lab in Maryland that did high-security bioterrorism work on anthrax and other highly lethal diseases; the Army High Security Laboratory in Porton Down, in England; and the so-called hot lab at the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), in Atlanta.Nonetheless, we continued to bustle around like amateurs in our cotton lab coats and latex gloves, checking our VERO cell lines. The cells began detaching from the glass sides of their containers: it was either a toxic effect or an infection, but either way, cytotoxicity had kicked in. That meant we might be close to isolating a virus, and we began extracting cells to cultivate them in a second line of VERO cells. And Pattyn had been told we should expect more samples from Zaire in the next few days.But just as we were beginning to cultivate the second VERO cell line, Pattyn intervened. He had received instructions from the Viral Diseases Unit of the World Health Organization (WHO) to ship all samples and biological material from the new mystery epidemic to Porton Down in Britain. (In fact, a few days later Porton Down sent them on to the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta, which was the world’s reference lab for hemorrhagic viruses.)Pattyn was furious, and I too was upset. It looked as though our outbreak investigation was over before it had even begun. Glumly, we prepared to pack everything in tightly sealed containers: the patient serum, the inoculated cell lines, and the autopsied mouse brains and samples. But then Pattyn told us to keep some of the material back. He claimed that we needed a few more days to ready it for transport. So we kept a few tubes of VERO cells, as well as some of the newborn mice, which were dying. Perhaps it was a stubborn rebellion against the whole Belgian history of constantly being forced to grovel to greater powers. That material was just too valuable, too glorious to let it go. It was new, it was exciting—just too exciting to hand it over to the Brits or, in particular, to the Americans.Pattyn was a colorful character, with a razor-sharp brain. He didn’t have the smug, colonial attitude of so many men of his generation; he wore funky eyeglasses and collected contemporary art. And although he could be contemptuous I never felt his scorn was connected to skin color or social class—only to stupidity. But he certainly had an outsized ego.There was a rack of secondary tubes in the lab, which we had inoculated after the first VERO cell line was killed. We knew there was something in there—something that was trouble—but still, we had taken out the rack so we could examine the tubes under the microscope. Doing that kind of work wasn’t Pattyn’s job. He was a micro-manager but he wasn’t a technician, and in fact he could be rather clumsy. But impulsively he reached for one of the precious tubes, to check it out himself under the scope, and as he did so it slipped from his hand and crashed on the floor.Little René Delgadillo was the one who got his shoes splashed. They were good, solid leather shoes but René bleated, “Madre de Dios” (Mother of God!) while Pattyn swore, “Godverdomme” (Goddamn!)—and there was a moment, just a beat, of blank fear. Immediately we whisked into action: the floor was disinfected and the shoes removed. It was just a small incident. But it struck me only then how lethal this thing really might be and the huge risks we had been taking in handling it so cavalierly.On October 12, our semiclandestine secondary cell line was ready for analysis. Guido took a sample and treated it so an ultrathin slice could be examined under an electron microscope. Then we took it over to Pattyn’s friend Wim Jacob, who handled electron microscopy in the university hospital lab. A few hours later he came over to our lab with the photographs.“What the hell is this?” said Pattyn.There was a long pause as he glared at the photographs, at us, at the walls of the corridor. I peered over his shoulder and saw what were by virus standards very large, long, wormlike structures: nothing like yellow fever. Pattyn’s excitement, or irritation, was rising. “This looks like Marburg!” he exploded. I didn’t know much about Marburg. Everyone else in the lab seemed to know about Marburg, and today of course all you’d need to do to find out would be to check the Internet. But back then I needed an atlas of infectious diseases. So I went to the institute’s library and sure enough our virus did look like Marburg. In those days Marburg was the only known virus that was this long—up to 14,000 nanometers, or 0.000014 millimeters. Huge. (In comparison, polio is up to 50 nanometers.) It had been identified just nine years before, in Germany, when a number of pharmaceutical workers became infected by a batch of monkeys imported from Uganda. It appeared to be extremely virulent and swiftly lethal. Seven of the 25 people infected by direct contact with the monkeys died with hemorrhagic fever, and six more individuals fell ill following contact with those primary infections.Marburg was clearly a very scary illness, and as we did not have Marburg virus–specific antibodies, we could not definitely conclude whether our isolate was Marburg. Perhaps it was a different virus with similar morphology.Pattyn was not suicidal. Once he had established that “our” virus was—at the very least—closely related to the terrifying Marburg, he had the sense to shelve all further work on it and sent the remaining samples directly to the high-security lab at the CDC.I was still very excited. It felt as though my childhood fantasy of exploration was almost within my reach. I kept arguing that we had to follow up our work, go to Zaire and check out the epidemic. I felt strongly that we shouldn’t hand this world-class discovery over to some other team. We had identified this virus, after all, so we should be the ones to establish its lethality and its real effects on the ground.Pattyn was not immune to this line of argument himself, but our lab had no budget to pay for anything so bold and unscripted as an expedition to Zaire. He went to the Ministerial Department for Development Aid, and was told they funded programs to help poor people, not programs to assist medical research. It was my first encounter with the sobering reality of fund-raising: how crucial it is and how difficult it can be to raise money when you wait until the crisis arises. It was also the first of a long series of confrontations with bureaucracies, a major lifelong source of irritation.Even if safety demanded that all the research had to be done in an expensively equipped, high-security lab, why should we leave it to the Americans and WHO to do the epidemiological work on the ground, where the epidemic was certainly still underway? How often does a small research institute in Belgium have the opportunity to make medical history? It’s not often that a twenty-seven-year-old comes within reach of the discovery of a new virus, and it looked as though the virus we cultivated had a fighting chance of being just that.On Thursday October 14, the answer came by telex: it was indeed a new virus. Karl Johnson, chief of Special Pathogens at the CDC, reported that his team had isolated a similar virus from other samples of blood from the same Flemish nun in Kinshasa. Pushing our information one step further, he added that this virus did not react with Marburg antibodies. Therefore it was different from Marburg, though we did not know how different it was.As for my impossible dream of taking our outbreak investigation to Zaire, I figured it was over. It was time to go back to looking for salmonella in the stool samples of patients with a nonspecific bellyache. I was crestfallen.But Pattyn was not a bad guy. I think he saw how despondent I was, and on Friday, October 15, he sent me to Paris for the weekend to a conference organized by Beecham, the pharmaceutical company, about some new antibiotic they were bringing out. However, when I walked into the conference room at the Hotel Nikko on that Friday afternoon, my name was on a screen, with a message: I should urgently contact a phone number in Brussels. What the heck?Before doing anything, I called Pattyn, who was still at the lab. He said the Department for Development Aid and the Ministry for Foreign Affairs had been ringing his phone off the hook: we had to get to Kinshasa. The Americans were going there to take a look at the epidemic, and there was some kind of French delegation already in place; even a South African was on his way. Also, Belgian expatriates in Kinshasa had begun panicking, sending their children to Europe because of the epidemic.“The Belgian government is under pressure to do something,” he told me. I thought, surely that “something” can’t be just me, a recent graduate from medical school? But I kept my mouth shut.“This is now a political priority!” Pattyn continued, and I thought: So, that’s how it goes. Unless something is a political priority, figuring out how to save lives is not a big issue.“It’s our Congo, you know,” he said, and I had no idea whether he meant it ironically or straight up, no ice.So I phoned a Dr. Kivits at the Department of Development Aid. There was minimal discussion. He said I should leave the next day on a 10-day mission. I asked if it would it be OK if I waited untilSunday, and Dr. Kivits said fine. So I said yes. I didn’t think about it for a second but asked my then-wife Greta, who was three months’ pregnant and immediately agreed.In a sense, it would be a voyage of self-discovery as much as discovery. In that classic way of the Grand Tour, I was leaving my home, at the age of twenty-seven, to discover myself. Leaving the plain, hard-headed Flemish world of no bullshit—head down, nose clean, hard work, low profile—and heading to a place of big, apocalyptic emotions: despair and exuberance and tragedy and fear. A place that was really coming apart at the seams; a slow-moving disaster scene that had just once again hit a new catastrophe. It was my dream: I was going to the heart of Africa—Zaire—to explore the outbreak of a new virus.Next, part two: ZaireI examined her blood, and it was a catastrophe. The platelet count was terrifyingly low. As green and unimaginative as I was, the real lethality of this virus began to sink in, and my hands shook a little as I handled her blood. Who knew how this virus was transmitted—by insects, or body fluids, or dust … .Adapted from No Time to Lose: A Life in Pursuit of Deadly Viruses by Peter Piot. Copyright © 2012 by Peter Piot. With permission of the publisher, W. W. Norton & Company Inc. 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