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Air stagnation persists so Burn ban is expandedNewhouse among GOP lawmakers urging

first_imgThe National Weather Service says strong high pressure is expected to intensify over the Pacific Northwest into next week.  An Air Stagnation Advisory is posted in Chelan Douglas and The Washington Department of Ecology issued a press release that said stagnant weather conditions are expected to continue in Central and Eastern Washington. Ecology is expanding and extending the Stage 1 burn ban.Starting today, the burn ban will be expanded to include Ferry, Pend Oreille, and Stevens counties, and the burn ban will continue in Chelan, Douglas, Kittitas, and Okanogan counties.   In an effort to prevent poor air quality, the burn ban will remain in effect until further notice.Under a Stage 1 ban, all outdoor burning is prohibited including residential, agricultural and forest burning. Use of uncertified wood stoves, fireplaces, inserts, and other uncertified wood-burning devices is prohibited unless they are a home’s only adequate source of heat.  Certified wood stoves, pellet stoves and other certified wood-burning devices are allowed.Call 866-211-6284 if you think someone is illegally burning or you are impacted by smoke.Up-to-date burn ban information is available at www.waburnbans.net.Ecology’s burn bans do not apply on tribal reservations, where the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has jurisdiction. Call 800-424-4372 for tribal burn ban information or visit EPA’s Washington Burn Banpage on their website.last_img read more

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Mothers diet during pregnancy may impact babys gut microbiome shows study

first_img Source:https://www.biomedcentral.com/ Jul 5 2018A mother’s diet during pregnancy may have an effect on the composition of her baby’s gut microbiome – the community of bacteria living in the gut – and the effect may vary by delivery mode, according to study published in the open access journal Microbiome.Sara Lundgren, lead author of the study said: “Our study demonstrates an association of a readily modifiable factor, maternal diet, with the infant gut microbiome. This knowledge may be key for developing evidence-based dietary recommendations for pregnant and lactating women.”Lundgren and colleagues at Dartmouth-Hitchcock medical Center, USA found that the gut microbiome in infants six weeks after delivery was composed mostly of Enterobactericeae (~20%), Bifidobacterium (18.6%), Bacteroides (10.44%) and Streptococcus (8.10%).The authors identified three distinct clusters of microbes in the guts of the 97 babies included in this study that had been vaginally delivered. Cluster 1 was characterized by a high abundance of Bifidobacterium, cluster 2 showed a high abundance of Streptococcus and Clostridium, while cluster 3 had a high abundance of Bacteroides. These clusters were different for the 48 babies delivered by caesarian section, where cluster 1 showed a high abundance of Bifidobacterium, cluster 2 was characterized by high Clostridium but low Streptococcus abundance, and cluster 3 showed a higher abundance of Enterobactericeae.The authors also observed what appear to be effects of certain aspects of the mothers’ diets on the babies’ gut microbiome. In babies delivered vaginally, the odds of being in cluster 2 were 2.73 times higher for each additional serving of fruit consumed by the mothers per day. Bifidobacterium was found to be decreased in vaginally born infants if mothers ate more fruit, but increased in babies born by caesarian in relation to the mothers’ consumption of red and processed meat. In babies delivered by caesarian section, the odds of being in cluster 2 were 2.36 higher for each additional maternal serving of dairy per day.Related StoriesConcurrent use of benzodiazepine and opioids complicates neonatal abstinence syndromeOpioids are major cause of pregnancy-related deaths in UtahExercise during pregnancy can promote bone health of both mother and childLundgren said: “We analyzed infants delivered vaginally and by cesarean section in separate groups due to our previous knowledge of the transfer of maternal microbiota to the infant that occurs during vaginal delivery, but not with cesarean section delivery. We expected results to differ based on delivery mode, but we were surprised to find that the abundances of some microbes were increased in association with maternal intake of a food group in one delivery mode group, but decreased in the other delivery mode group.”To shed further light on the mechanisms by which maternal diet may affects children’s health via the gut microbiome the authors used stool samples from 145 infants enrolled in the New Hampshire Birth Cohort Study, a research project that investigates how various factors affect the health of pregnant women and their children. Most infants whose data was used in this study were born vaginally (66.9%) and exclusively breast fed (70.3%) at six weeks of age. Information on the mothers’ diets during pregnancy at 24 to 28 weeks gestation was obtained via food frequency questionnaires.The authors caution that as their sample only included mothers and infants from Northern New England which has a relatively homogenous population, the generalizability of the findings may be limited. The authors also point out that the effects observed in this study may be due in part to maternal diet during lactation. The observational nature of the study does not allow for conclusions about cause and effect or the directionality of the observed association between maternal diet and the baby gut microbiome.last_img read more

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Genesys Spine announces FDA clearance of AISC StandAlone System

first_img Direct anterior approach – Allows for a smaller, mid-line incision. Non-screw-based fixation. Quick, simple, non-impacting anchor insertion – Does not need an awl or drill. Zero-step locking mechanism – Contains a locking feature that provides visual confirmation of engagement, but allows for anchor removal when desired. Easily revised or removed – Use of the removal instruments allows the locking mechanism to be defeated so the anchor can be extracted. No drilling is required. Related StoriesNew robotic technology increases the safety and precision of spinal fusion surgeriesCleveland Clinic surgical team performs its first in utero fetal surgery to repair birth defectMice study suggests potential treatment approach for MS in humansDr. Matthew Philips, board-certified neurosurgeon and Director of the Brain and Spine Center at SouthCoast Health in Massachusetts says, “The ease of application of the AIS-C Stand-Alone will reduce both my surgical times and the morbidity associated with plate and screw constructs. This advantageous technique has made this my implant of choice for ACDFs.””The most significant aspect of the AIS-C design is its simplicity to implant. From a surgeon’s perspective, there’s only one extra step compared to a standard cervical fusion. Once everything is loaded, they simply squeeze the trigger of the inserter and detach from the implant.” -J. Landon Gilkey, Senior Principal Design Engineer, Genesys Spine.”The AIS-C Stand-Alone system works great from insertion to removal and I think it will remain one of Genesys’ flagship products for years to come.” -Benjamin Keller, Product Development Engineer, Genesys Spine.Source: www.genesysspine.com Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Sep 11 2018Genesys Spine is pleased to announce the FDA clearance of our latest product line, the AIS-C Stand-Alone System.The AIS-C Stand-Alone system is a first of its kind, non-screw based, zero-profile, direct-anterior stand-alone interbody system for the cervical spine. It was designed to provide the greatest ease of use to the surgeon at every step of the procedure.Advantages of the AIS-C Stand-Alone System include:last_img read more

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Weighing a hot Mars

first_imgBecause we live on a small world, it’s natural to think intelligent life elsewhere does, too, but small planets orbiting other stars are tough to study. Now, for the first time, astronomers have measured the approximate mass and density of an extrasolar planet smaller than Earth. Earlier work indicated the planet blocks so little of its sun’s light—a red dwarf named Kepler-138—that it must be only the size of Mars. In this artist’s conception, the small world is in the foreground at left, its position shifted by gravitational tugs from two other planets, one of which is shown at lower right. As astronomers report online today in Nature, this gravitational interaction reveals that the little world is roughly 6.6% as massive as Earth—intermediate between Mercury (5.5%) and Mars (10.7%)—and roughly 2.6 times denser than water. That’s two-thirds as dense as Mars, which might suggest it has more rock and less iron than the Red Planet. In fact, the numbers are so uncertain that no firm conclusion about its composition is yet possible, but future observations should yield tighter constraints. In any event, the planet lies so close to its sun—revolving every 10.3 days—that its climate probably resembles hostile Mercury’s, making it an unlikely abode for alien life.last_img read more

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Ultraprocessed foods may make you eat more clinical trial suggests

first_img HALL ET AL./CELL METABOLISM By Kelly ServickMay. 16, 2019 , 11:00 AM ‘Ultraprocessed’ foods may make you eat more, clinical trial suggests Researchers tracked how much people ate on “ultraprocessed” (left) and “minimally processed” (right) diets that were matched for calories and nutrients. Something about the industrial processing of food makes us more likely to overeat, according to a new study. Volunteers ate more and gained more weight on a heavily processed diet than an unprocessed one, even when the two diets had the same available calories and nutrients.The study is “a landmark first,” and a “shot over the bow” in a debate over the health of processed food, says Steven Heymsfield, an obesity researcher at Louisiana State University’s Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge who was not involved with the work. But some experts question whether the study controlled for important differences between the diets.The definition of “processed food” is controversial. Nearly all the food at grocery stores is subject to some processing: It’s pasteurized, vacuum sealed, cooked, frozen, fortified, and mixed with preservatives and flavor enhancers. Some of these processes can change its nutritional qualities. And some studies have found associations between processed diets and increased risk of obesity, cancer, and even earlier death, but none has shown a causal link. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Still, some health officials and national governments have seized on processing as a culprit in the global epidemic of obesity and related diseases. The official dietary guidelines of Brazil, for example, recommend that people “limit consumption of processed foods.”Kevin Hall, a physiologist at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases in Bethesda, Maryland, suspected that processed foods were linked to poor health simply because they were likely to contain lots of fat, sugar, and salt. So in the new experiment, he and his team tried to rule out those factors. They recruited 20 healthy people and gave each about $6000 to surrender some freedoms, dietary and otherwise. Participants spent 28 straight days in a National Institutes of Health facility—with no excursions. They wore loose-fitting scrubs to make it harder for them to guess whether their weight was changing. Each was restricted to an “ultraprocessed” diet or a “minimally processed” diet for 2 weeks, and then switched to the other diet for 2 more weeks.The study used a food classification system called NOVA developed by a team of researchers in Brazil. It describes “ultraprocessed” foods as ready-to-eat formulations with five or more ingredients, often including flavor-enhancing additives, dyes, or stabilizers. To be considered “minimally processed,” foods can be frozen, dried, cooked, or vacuum packed, but they can’t include added sugar, salt, or oil. Meals in the ultraprocessed arm of the study included packaged breakfast cereals, sweetened yogurt, canned ravioli, and hot dogs. Those in the unprocessed diet included oatmeal, steamed vegetables, salads, and grilled chicken. Dietitians carefully matched the processed and unprocessed diets for calories, sugar, sodium, fat, and fiber.The captive participants did enjoy one big freedom: They chose how much to consume. Once they ate their fill, Hall’s team calculated their intake by painstakingly weighing the leftovers, down to every dollop of ketchup that didn’t make it onto a hot dog. The researchers found that by the second week of each diet, people were eating, on average, about 500 more calories per day when the fare was ultraprocessed. That extra consumption led to a weight gain of about a kilogram during the 2 weeks on the ultraprocessed diet, versus a loss of about a kilogram on the unprocessed diet, they report today in Cell Metabolism.“They showed that the effect [of processing] goes beyond nutrients,” says Carlos Monteiro, an epidemiologist at the University of São Paulo in São Paulo, Brazil, who helped develop the NOVA classification system and supports government interventions to limit processed food consumption. Simply reformulating packaged foods to contain less sugar, salt, or fat—as many large companies are now attempting—won’t eliminate their risks, he says.If participants continued eating those extra 500 calories, they would “gain a lot of weight—a lot —over time,” says Heymsfield, though he notes that their gusto for the ultraprocessed diet might have waned if the study had gone on a few weeks longer. He suspects people overate processed food because it was more appealing. “The ultraprocessed foods look like foods I might overeat also, given the chance,” he says.Yet on surveys, the participants rated the processed meals as no more pleasant than the unprocessed ones. If they weren’t enjoying the food more, why were they eating more of it?One possibility is that industrial processing produces softer foods that are easier to chew and swallow—and thus easier to scarf down. The participants ate faster on the ultraprocessed diet, and studies have found that people tend to eat more when they eat faster. Blood tests also revealed that, while on the unprocessed diet, people had higher levels of an appetite-suppressing hormone called PYY and lower levels of the appetite-stimulating hormone ghrelin, though it’s not clear how these changes relate to food processing.And despite the researchers’ efforts to perfectly match the nutrition of the diets, there were some differences that may have influenced how much people ate. The ultraprocessed meals contained slightly less protein, and some research has found that people tend to eat until they reach a certain protein target. If that protein is more diluted, those studies hint, people will consume more calories to hit the same target.Ultraprocessed foods also tend to be more energy-dense—they have many more calories per gram, notes Barbara Rolls, an obesity researcher who studies eating behavior at Pennsylvania State University in State College. (Although Hall’s team concluded the two diets were roughly equal in energy density, the measurements included low-energy-density beverages added to the ultraprocessed diet to boost fiber via dissolved supplements.) Rolls’s team has found that more energy-dense foods lead people to eat more calories because they tend to eat a consistent weight or volume of food day to day.Hall and his colleagues are now planning a similar-size study with a few tweaks: They’ll bump up the protein in the ultraprocessed diet and swap fiber-enriched beverages for soups, which may encourage people to eat more slowly.For now, some researchers aren’t convinced that processing itself is a menace. “A lot of … the ultraprocessed foods in this study are perhaps ones that we [shouldn’t] to be eating too often,” Rolls says. And most people don’t have the time or resources to prepare farm-to-table meals, she adds. “If we had to live without processed foods, I don’t think we would be able to feed the population—nor would people like it.”last_img read more

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Powerful CRISPR cousin accidentally mutates RNA while editing DNA target

first_imgJoung, a pioneering developer of base editors, was startled by the RNA changes, which had cytosines being converted to uracil, an RNA base that’s related to thymine. “When a postdoc first showed me the results and we saw tens of thousands of RNA cytosines being edited, I was like, ‘Wait a minute, what are we looking at here?’”Jia Chen, who does genome editing research at ShanghaiTech University in China and was not involved in the new work, was not as surprised, noting that deaminases were originally described as having the ability to alter RNA. But he says the new work will push the field to solve the problem. “The finding will [lead to] developing novel base editors with higher editing precision,” Chen says.Joung says his lab’s recent discovery of the old deaminase literature is what led his lab to do these experiments. And they’ve already engineered deaminases that substantially reduce the number of inadvertent RNA edits. “That was very encouraging to us,” Joung says. “We’re ultimately protein engineers, and we want to figure out if we can engineer the system to make the mutations go away.”David Liu, a Harvard University chemist who created the first base editor and co-founded two companies based on the technology with Joung, notes that deaminases naturally edit cellular RNA, stressing that the biological consequences of such editing are unclear. He adds that his own lab’s studies of base editors have also found RNA off-target edits, but at far lower levels. The differences between their results, says Liu, likely have less to do with the amount of off-target RNA editing that takes place than the different way Joung’s group sorted its cells and analyzed the results.Both Liu and Joung stress that their labs have found deaminases that work only on either DNA or RNA, which makes them confident that they can decouple the off-target effects seen with the current base editors. “Base editors are still incredibly powerful tools,” Joung says. “This is just another parameter we need to understand.” Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe When researchers first reported 3 years ago that they had created base editors, a version of the powerful genome-editing tool CRISPR, excitement swirled around their distinct powers to more subtly alter DNA compared with CRISPR itself. But the weaknesses of base editors have become increasingly apparent, and a new study shows they can also accidentally mutate the strands of RNA that help build proteins or perform other key cellular tasks. Researchers say this could complicate developing safe therapies with the technology and hamper other research applications.Human diseases from sickle cell to Tay-Sachs are caused by a single mutation to one of the four DNA bases—adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine—and CRISPR has often had difficulty swapping out the bad actors. That’s in part because CRISPR cuts double-stranded DNA at targeted places and then relies on finicky cell repair mechanisms to do the heavy lifting of inserting a corrected DNA sequence for a mutation. Base editors, in contrast, chemically change one DNA base into another with enzymes called deaminases, which doesn’t require a cut or help from the cell.Base editors, which adapt key components of CRISPR to reach targeted places in the genome, have been shown to have many off-target effects on DNA. But until now, its effects on RNA, which contains three of the same bases as DNA, had escaped scrutiny. So J. Keith Joung, a pathologist and molecular biologist at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, led a team that put base editors into human liver and kidney cells. Their finding: Deaminases can also alter RNA, the group reports today in Nature. The enzyme that gives a powerful tool known as a “base editor” the ability to change DNA also has an off-target effect on RNA (above). Email By Jon CohenApr. 17, 2019 , 4:10 PMcenter_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Powerful CRISPR cousin accidentally mutates RNA while editing DNA target Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) nobeastsofierce Science/Alamy Stock Photo last_img read more

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ScarJo Whitesplains Any Role Comments After Backlash

first_img Morehouse Students Take To Social Media And Claim Sexual Harassment Complaints Were Ignored It’s long been evident that Hollywood has a major diversity problem. And with the film industry’s history steeped in racism, it definitely does not help when white actors continue to feel entitled to play roles meant for Black people as well as other people of color.On Sunday, actress Scarlett Johnansson came under fire for comments she made during a recent interview with As If Magazine about being “allowed to play” any role.“You know, as an actor I should be allowed to play any person, or any tree, or any animal because that is my job and the requirements of my job,” Johansson said. “I feel like it’s a trend in my business and it needs to happen for various social reasons, yet there are times it does get uncomfortable when it affects the art because I feel art should be free of restrictions.” More By Megan Sims Jamaican Republican Who Is Running Against AOC Supported Her A Year Ago In 2018, Johansson faced backlash from the LGBTQ community for agreeing to play a transgender man in the movie “Rub & Tug.” She went on to reluctantly remove herself from the role. One year earlier in 2017, she faced another controversy for playing an Asian character in the movie “Ghost In The Shell.”Many people called the actress out for her comments on social media: White Tears! Former Meteorologist Files Lawsuit Claiming He Was Fired Because Of Diversity Scarlett Johansson: I can play anything I want. Actors can play anything they want.White cis men: yeah!Female POC: I am Bond, J…White cis men: not like that— Delaney King (@delaneykingrox) July 15, 2019 Blackface , Scarlett Johansson , White actors playing Black characters center_img Johansson tried to walk back her comments claiming media outlets edited them for “clickbait.” Then she went on to pretty much say the same thing again:“An interview that was recently published has been edited for click bait and is widely taken out of context,” Johansson said in a statement. “The question I was answering in my conversation with the contemporary artist, David Salle, was about the confrontation between political correctness and art. I personally feel that, in an ideal world, any actor should be able to play anybody and Art, in all forms, should be immune to political correctness.”While one of the main issues that came to light following her comments was the lack of representation of transgender actors in film, there is also the lingering topic of Black representation, as well.And though Johansson went on to claim that she does support and fight for diversity, if white actors, who are usually preferred over Black and brown actors, can play anyone, how is that diverse?Over the years, many white actors and actresses have played Black people in movies, such as Angelina Jolie, who played a real-life Black woman in “A Mighty Heart;” Joseph Fiennes, who played Michael Jackson in “Elizabeth, Michael and Marlon;” and Jeanne Elizabeth Crain, who played a mixed-race Black woman in “Pinky.”Johansson’s logic could also be applied to the too-many-to-count incidents where actors like Judy Garland, Fred Astaire, Bing Crosby, Robert Downey Jr. and more have donned blackface in films that continued to perpetuate stereotypes of Black people. The Common Good Forum & American Spirit Awards 2019 Scarlett Johansson preparing for her upcoming roles: pic.twitter.com/YFUK7T1R1f— hannah lee (@hannahleewrites) July 14, 2019 And as Johansson continues to believe she should be able to play anyone, Black actors continue to struggle for opportunities in film that are all too often given to white people.SEE ALSO:State Department Releases Statement On A$AP Rocky Being Jailed In Sweden R. Kelly Alleged Sex Slaves Post A Video From The Singer’s Condo In Trump Tower No one:No one in the world:No one in the universe: Scarlett Johansson: pic.twitter.com/cPNMiZj2s3— Chris ︽✵︽ (@ChrisScavenger) July 14, 2019 Twitter Destroys Mia Love For Defending Trump’s Racist ‘Go Back’ Tweetslast_img read more

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Robocall Defends Woman Who Killed A Black Man

first_imgHannah Payne, accused murderer of Kenneth HerringSource: WSB-TV Screenshot / WSB-TV ScreenshotWhite supremacists have emerged to defend the 21-year-old woman who witnessed a hit-and-run accident before hunting down the driver, a Black man, and shooting him to death in Georgia last week. Hannah Payne was not involved in the hit and run but apparently felt the need to try to police 62-year-old Kenneth Herring before she made herself his judge, jury and executioner. Meghan McCain Whines That She Can’t Attack llhan Omar Because Trump Is Too Racist AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisMoreShare to EmailEmailEmail More By NewsOne Staff Clayton County Police Department , Hannah Payne , hit-and-run , Kenneth Herring On May 7, Herring reportedly hit another vehicle with his car before driving away. Payne, who was reportedly not involved in the collision, was compelled to drive after Herring for about a mile before she blocked his car with hers, got out and confronted him in what turned out to be a fatal encounter. It was unclear if Herring even realized he had been in an accident.Herring’s estranged wife said she thought Payne murdered her husband. She wondered why Payne, who had called 911, got out of her vehicle to confront Herring before police arrived. “If they told you to stay in the car, why would you get out? That means you weren’t in no danger if you got out of your car to go to his car,” Christine Herring said to WSB-TV. “I think she needs to go to jail because she committed murder. You need to go to jail.”Payne’s lawyer said his client was simply trying to do the right thing.“It just seems like an unfortunate situation of a good Samaritan trying to stop a person on a hit-and-run,” Matt Tucker said. He also said that she went to Herring’s car with her gun “to keep him from leaving again.”A witness described Payne as the aggressor who immediately claimed after Herring was shot that he was the one who pulled the trigger.Payne was charged with murder without malice and was being held in the Clayton County Jail without bond.Rest in peace, Kenneth Herring.SEE ALSO:Social Media Says It Has Identified The Texas Cop Who Shot And Killed Pamela TurnerCrystal Mason Speaks Out For The First Time Since Being In Federal Custody Now, residents of Clayton County have reportedly begun receiving a racist robocall after Payne was charged with murdering Herring.“Negroes aren’t American,” the call, which appeared to be paid for by the hate group Road To Power, says in part. “They aren’t really fully human. It’s time to send them all to Africa. She’s been cast as the criminal when in fact it was the negro.”The call continued, “Hannah Payne did nothing wrong. Tell the District Attorney of Clayton County, Georgia, free Hannah Payne.”Listen to the disturbing call below. A$AP Rocky Being In A Swedish Prison Will Not Stop Her From Going To The Country That Showed Her ‘So Much Love’center_img Gov. Cuomo Slams Mayor Bill De Blasio For The Eric Garner Case But He Also Failed The Family @ClaytonCountyPD, @ClaytonCountyGa I just received the most vile, insensitive robophone call concerning the Hannah Payne Case. CC should investigate this matter. I am not even a resident of CC and I received this phone call. #Absolutedisgustandwearegoingbackwards— c_way (@c_way) May 13, 2019 White criminals' mugshots So this was sent to my voicemail at my parents home in Fayetteville please retweet so we can bring awareness to exactly how vile Hannah Payne’s crime was, she has hate groups supporting her pic.twitter.com/LJK5VDrPVz— Simone Jones (@SllMMO) May 15, 2019 White People Who Committed Heinous Crimes And Didn’t Go To Prison LISTEN TO THIS RACIST ASS MESSAGE THAT WAS LEFT ON MY HOME ANSWERING IN FAYETTEVILLE GEORGIA REGARDING HANNAH PAYNE WHO KILLED A BLACK MAN. @TheShadeRoomm @cnn pic.twitter.com/FhN4CsR7ht— G A B (@gabxo_) May 14, 2019Other social media users claimed to have gotten the same robocall.last_img read more

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Uber and Lyft may be making San Franciscos traffic worse

first_img Uber and Lyft may be making San Francisco’s traffic worse It’s no news to San Francisco, California, residents that traffic is getting worse. Now, a new study suggests the biggest culprit, from 2010 to 2016, were cars driving for the ride-sharing companies Uber and Lyft, which are both headquartered in San Francisco. The new findings, based on a computer model that simulated the speed of traffic with Uber and Lyft vehicles removed, echo those of another study of New York City.A comparison of traffic speeds from 2010, before ride-sharing apps were widely used, with 2016 shows the time cars spent sitting in San Francisco traffic increased by 69%. To find out how much of that was caused by ride-sharing vehicles, researchers used the model to forecast what traffic might have been like in 2016 without Uber or Lyft.To do this, the authors needed to know how many additional cars Lyft and Uber were putting on the streets. When the companies refused to share this information, researchers used a program that had thousands of “ghost users” ping the Uber and Lyft apps every 5 seconds for 6 weeks in 2016, revealing the locations of nearby drivers—and how many were on the streets at any given time. iStock.com/nycshooter The model closely predicted the real-life traffic seen in 2010 and, after plugging in the Uber and Lyft driver data, 2016. The researchers then used the model to envision 2016 traffic minus the cars driving for Uber and Lyft.Without those cars, the model estimated just a 22% increase in traffic delays from 2010–16, suggesting ride-sharing companies were responsible for more than half of San Francisco’s real-world traffic increase, the authors report today in Science Advances. The remainder of San Francisco’s traffic increase was accounted for by growth in population and employment, which grew by roughly 70,000 people and 150,000 jobs respectively.Uber and Lyft have long said their services may relieve urban congestion by facilitating access to public transit or even by so overwhelming customers with convenience that they ditch their personal vehicles altogether. Uber did not respond to a request for comment, but a spokesperson for Lyft said the study—which has the potential to affect transportation policy decisions from San Francisco to New York City—does not adequately account for traffic growth because of tourism or delivery services like Amazon. 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Country By Alex FoxMay. 8, 2019 , 2:00 PM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

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To Resist Manipulation Ask One Question

first_imgThe op-ed The New York Times published last week spotlights a presidency in crisis — so much so that apparently there is an internal “resistance” trying to make sure the president doesn’t screw up. I’ve worked in a lot of companies and the idea of having a group of executives and assistants working to keep the CEO from doing something stupid isn’t as unusual as you might think. This is likely something Elon Musk should have in place before he gets himself fired.The new Bob Woodward book does suggest the White House is a bit of a mess. That shouldn’t be a huge surprise, even if you only look at the unprecedented turnover rate of cabinet members.The book is pretty damning, and it appears to be well written and well researched — but it doesn’t really cover that much new ground. The New York Times op-ed doesn’t really add much to the book, or to other recent books, except for the idea of an organized “resistance.”The result of an op-ed like this typically would not be a change in behavior. Rather, it would trigger an all-out effort to find and fire the writer, not to mention pretty much render the “resistance” moot.Can you imagine an op-ed in a French newspaper during the Second World War talking about how the French Resistance was secretly blocking German efforts to govern France? The person who wrote it likely would be shot by the French Resistance.If your effectiveness as a group is predicated on your secrecy, why would you break secrecy, unless you wanted to torpedo the group or someone in it? We are a few months from a critical election. If you could get one party to go on a witch hunt inside itself, you likely could distract it enough so that it would be far more likely to lose.This would be an important question for The New York Times, because these things tend to come out, and the Times trying to manipulate an election would be problematic for that publication, regardless of whether it knew this or not.Another answer to the “why” question might involve a disgruntled employee who was passed over for a promised raise. (Money is a lousy motivator when you add it, according to Maslow, but if you take it away it works incredibly well at motivating employees against you.) The president effectively just took raises off the table for all federal workers (which should result in a huge number of them wanting him gone).The op-ed could be a play to tarnish someone else with Mike Pence the seemingly obvious target, given some unusual wording. (But why target Pence?)A scarier thought is that the Times op-ed was designed specifically to do what it is doing. However, instead of influencing the upcoming mid-term elections, its purpose might be to eliminate the effort to keep the president from doing something massively stupid.In other words, the op-ed’s goal might be to render ineffective any effort to prevent a catastrophic presidential decision. Now whether that is the intention or not, that is the likely outcome. That doesn’t bode well for the United States, if the president’s judgment is massively compromised, as Woodward’s book and the op-ed suggest.The actual “why” behind this op-ed may be far more important than what it says. It should be pretty clear by now that the level of effort devoted to manipulating our opinions is unprecedented at the moment. Granted, a lot of this has to do with the fact that most of the “free” online services we use aren’t free at all. They are trading our ability to make measured opinions for advertisers’ money, and some of these “advertisers” are foreign governments.With all of these attempts to manipulate us into doing things we otherwise don’t want to do — many of which are surprisingly successful — there is one question we should be asking of any inflammatory story: Why?We focus on the what, where, and when almost exclusively, but it’s become increasingly important for us to know the motive behind the news. Last week’s op-ed in The New York Times is a good example, because the “why” is likely far more interesting than what is said in the piece.I’ll close with my product of the week: Cinego, an impressive head-mounted streaming video system. I get really bored when I have my teeth cleaned. I have to sit in the chair for up to an hour (my tartar likely could be used in building construction, it is so hard), and I get really bored watching the ceiling fan and waiting for surprise pains.My last appointment wasn’t so bad, however, as I brought my Goovis G2 Cinego headset with me. Rather than watch the fan, I watched the sci-fi movie Serenity, and I was disappointed the appointment didn’t last longer. The Trump Resistance Op-Ed What makes the difference with Cinego is the combination of high resolution displays for each eye. You can adjust for the distance between your pupils and for focus individually. This result is a crystal-clear high-resolution image that is impressive in use.I ordered my Goovis G2 Cinego through Indiegogo when the product was first launched and got a decent deal — under US$500. Currently they are on Amazon for close to $800, but for those of us who like to enjoy high-quality personal video in tight places, this is still a decent product for the money.Cinego isn’t without issues. For instance, I can’t seem to raise support to save my life. The software update function currently is not working, and I can’t log into Google or Amazon from the device at the moment. (Issues such as these often arise with the initial run of a product.)When Cinego does work, mostly with Netflix, it is brilliant. Navigation is pretty easy, as is streaming content. Viewing downloaded content is a bit more difficult. Both the picture and sound are wonderful. Battery life is about two movies, suggesting that you’ll want a charging cable (micros USB) or a portable battery backup product for long trips.Except for poor support and the inability to use Amazon or sign into Google, I really am impressed with the performance of this product. As a result, the Goovis G2 Cinego headset is my product of the week.I’ll add this cautionary advice, though: Before you buy one, I suggest you send a note to Goovis to see if you get a response. The lack of support is troubling.The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of ECT News Network. Wrapping Up Rob Enderle has been an ECT News Network columnist since 2003. His areas of interest include AI, autonomous driving, drones, personal technology, emerging technology, regulation, litigation, M&E, and technology in politics. He has an MBA in human resources, marketing and computer science. He is also a certified management accountant. Enderle currently is president and principal analyst of the Enderle Group, a consultancy that serves the technology industry. He formerly served as a senior research fellow at Giga Information Group and Forrester. Email Rob. Understanding Manipulation Goovis Cinego VR Headset We are under an almost constant barrage of companies and people who are trying to get us to do things we otherwise wouldn’t do. From scamming us for money or information to scamming us to vote against our own best interests, the level of effort going into manipulating us is unprecedented.What concerns me about The New York Times op-ed is that, regardless of whether it is true or not, it will disable efforts to prevent a presidential mistake. In the future, anyone who should attempt to play that role likely would be fired.The “why” is always important. In this case, the answer to “why” may be that someone wants to do the country harm. I doubt this will end well at all. In any case, to protect ourselves from the increasing waves of manipulation, we need to channel our inner 3-year-olds and ask “why” far more often. Sales, marketing and politics — in governments, companies and a lot of family dynamics — are all about manipulation. Understanding the need to manipulate and being able to identify it are critical skills to becoming successful in most any field. Both confirmation bias and argumentative theory have at their cores an inbred programmed foundation of needing to manipulate others, which often overcomes good sense and even self-preservation.The ability to manipulate is a form of power and status, and it currently revolves around an ever-changing but still growing group of people we call “influencers,” which is just a nice way to say “manipulators at scale.” You can profit handsomely from this, particularly if you are good at it, but if you allow yourself to be manipulated by someone who doesn’t have your best interests at heart, the results can be personally damaging.One of the painful trends now is the ramped-up activity of folks who attempt to manipulate you — a less kind term is defraud you — into sending them money. Facebook seems to be up to its armpits in folks like this at the moment. It has a reporting structure in place. Email and, particularly, the age-old scam phone calls are variants of this game.The defense is to simply ask “why” they are calling you. In most cases, they want your money or your information. For instance, you get a note on Facebook from someone you’ve never met who wants a relationship. The person doesn’t know you, probably hasn’t even read your profile, and really doesn’t care what you look like. Chances are the “why” is they want you to send them money. Knowing this you don’t engage. last_img read more

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Apple Boosts Performance in New iPad Air and Mini

first_imgThe mini also benefits from the A12 chip, which delivers three times the performance of its predecessor and nine times faster graphics, according to Apple.Its Retina display is 25 percent brighter than previous models, and it has the highest pixel density of any iPad.Both units have an 8-megapixel rear-facing camera and a 7MP front-facing camera.The f/2.4 rear camera supports autofocus, panoramas, HDR for stills, exposure control, burst mode, tap to focus, timer shots, auto image stabilization and photo geotagging.It also supports 1080 HD video recording, slow motion at 120 fps, time-lapse video with image stabilization, a 3x video zoom, and video geotagging.The f/2.2 front camera supports many of the same features as the rear camera, including HDR, exposure control, and burst and timer modes.The Air and the mini are available to order online immediately, and they will be in stores next week. Both will be offered in gold, silver or space gray.”Today the iPad family takes two big leaps forward with an all-new 10.5-inch iPad Air that brings high-end size, features and performance at a breakthrough price, and a major upgrade to the 7.9-inch iPad mini, which also brings Apple Pencil, Retina display and the A12 Bionic chip to the many customers that love its compact size,” said Phil Schiller, Apple’s senior vice president of worldwide marketing. Big Leap Forward Smartphone Cannibals Teen Appeal The A12 boosts overall performance of the new Air by 70 percent and doubles graphics performance, according to Apple.The Air’s screen — now 20 percent larger with half a million more pixels — also has been upgraded to a 2224 x1668 pixel Retina display with True Tone technology.True Tone dynamically adjusts the screen’s white balance based on the light around it, so it’s easier to view in any conditions. John P. Mello Jr. has been an ECT News Network reportersince 2003. His areas of focus include cybersecurity, IT issues, privacy, e-commerce, social media, artificial intelligence, big data and consumer electronics. He has written and edited for numerous publications, including the Boston Business Journal, theBoston Phoenix, Megapixel.Net and GovernmentSecurity News. Email John. The new iPad Air is an “uptick in technology” over previous models, noted David McQueen, a research director at ABI Research, a technology advisory company headquartered in Oyster Bay, New York.”It has a larger screen, better processor, lighter weight, eSIM — all while nudging up the processing power to that of the iPad Pro, but at a markedly cheaper price than the Pro,” he told TechNewsWorld.”It has also adopted technology like the Smart Keyboard and Apple Pencil, which was initially just the preserve of the iPad Pro,” McQueen added.The 10.5-inch Air seems to be a replacement for the 10.5-inch iPad Pro, which has been discontinued.”It looks like a refresh of that previous generation of iPad Pro without including all the bells and whistles on the latest version,” said Paul Gagnon, director of technology analysis and research at IHS Markit, a research, analysis and advisory firm headquartered in London.”The focus is to hit a $500 price point. The 2018 iPad Pro was meant to be a notebook PC replacement, so the typical configuration is well over $1,000,” he told TechNewsWorld.”This is Apple’s way of maintaining some volume at a mid-range price point, especially to compete with some of the cheaper offerings that have come from Samsung and others,” Gagnon added.center_img A major upgrade brings Apple Pencil support, Retina display and the A12 Bionic chip to theiPad mini. iPad Pro Substitute The mini refresh also seemed puzzling to Lauren Guenveur, a senior research analyst at IDC, a market research company based in Framingham, Massachusetts.”I heard rumors of the launch of a new iPad mini for many months before today, and for the life of me, I couldn’t figure out why they would bring back a small screen tablet when they have a smartphone with a screen that approaches the same size as the iPad mini,” she told TechNewsWorld.That said, Guenveur’s anecdotal experience suggests there may be some potential for the new mini.”I do a lot traveling for work, and I do consistently see the iPad mini being the tablet that most teenagers and children have for media consumption,” she observed.”The mini seems to be for either technology laggards, or for those who need a device purely for consuming media,” Guenveur added.Although the tablet market is generally in decline, Apple has been able to buck the trend, for the most part. It may continue to do so with its latest iPads.”The second quarter, third quarter, fourth quarter is going to look pretty good for Apple tablets,” Guenveur said, “but I don’t how much growth they have left in the iPad after that.” Apple on Monday announced a new 10.5-inch iPad and a refresh of the iPad mini.The 10.5-inch iPad Air, which will sell for US$499 ($629 with cellular), provides 64 gigabytes of solid state storage and WiFi support. It has Apple’s latest mobile processor, the A12 Bionic chip, and supports Apple Pencil and the company’s smart keyboard.”The Bionic A12 is a cut above the processors used in all other tablets on the market,” Tim Bajarin, president of Campbell, California-based Creative Strategies, told TechNewsWorld.The new 7.9-inch iPad mini, which will sell at a base price of $399 with WiFi support ($529 with cellular), also has an A12 chip, as well as Apple Pencil support. Apple appears to be focusing the iPad on creative work, like note-taking and sketching, observed San Jose, California-based Kevin Krewell, principal analyst at Tirias Research, a high-tech research and advisory firm.”The iPad mini could be a replacement for a reporter’s notepad now that there’s Pencil support” he told TechNewsWorld. “It does seem that these products will undercut the demand for the iPad Pro, especially the 11-inch version.”Although the rationale behind the Air refresh seemed apparent, the upgrade of the mini puzzled some analysts.”I don’t quite get the point of it,” Gagnon said.”At $400 for an 8-inch tablet, it is much more expensive than the typical small tablet, which is usually in the $100 to $200 range,” he pointed out.”There’s some overlap with larger smartphones that have been introduced,” Gagnon said, “so we’ve seen a dropoff in shipment volumes of tablets with those smaller screen sizes in the last year or so.”Worldwide shipments of tablets in the 7- to 9-inch category dropped from 84 million units in 2017 to fewer than 60 million units in 2018, he noted. The same is true for the tablet market, generally, with worldwide shipments slipping from 176 million units in 2017 to just over 140 million in 2018.”It’s a declining category,” Gagnon said, “but most of that decline is coming from the smaller screen sizes, which are being cannibalized by the much larger smartphones.”last_img read more

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TARGET PharmaSolutions and Bristol Myers Squibb partner to advance IBD research

first_imgTARGET-IBD continues to make tremendous progress by enrolling a diverse patient cohort – including adult and pediatric patients – from a network of academic and community sites.  The meticulously detailed real-world data it is collecting from these patients, such as severity of disease, is valuable for TARGET-IBD industry partners like BMS as they work to develop treatments to enhance patient outcomes.  Our partnership demonstrates a shared vision of advancing IBD research and builds on our current partnership with Bristol-Myers Squibb for TARGET-NASH and TARGET-HCC.” Meg Powell, Pharm.D., CEO of TARGET PharmaSolutions, stated: Dec 5 2018TARGET PharmaSolutions, Inc., a company focused on real-world evidence, is pleased to announce that Bristol Myers Squibb has entered into a strategic partnership for TARGET-IBD.TARGET-IBD is a longitudinal observational study that evaluates patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease, including adult and pediatric patients with ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease and in determinate Colitis. TARGET-IBD has enrolled over 1,850 patients to date at 30 investigative sites.  TARGET-IBD is led by an academic steering committee co-chaired by Bruce Sands, MD (Mount Sinai), David Rubin, MD (University of Chicago), and Millie Long, MD (University of North Carolina).Dr. Millie Long explained: The TARGET-IBD study design is disease focused, not treatment-specific, allowing for continuous acquisition of natural history and outcomes data, including patient reported outcomes (PROs), as new treatments continue to enter the market and clinical programs evolve.It also includes a biorepository which its stakeholders can access for translational studies of viral resistance, genomics and biomarkers to further their research of inflammatory bowel disease.TARGET PharmaSolutions provides regulatory grade data and analysis that can be used throughout the pharmaceutical development and commercialization process.  The TARGET model organizes a community of stakeholders, including key scientific leaders, regulatory agencies, pharmaceutical manufacturers, and patient advocacy groups, around a specific disease to generate real world evidence about the natural history of the given disease, current treatment paradigm, and patient outcomes.  This model enables TARGET’s stakeholders to answer critical strategic and planning questions.  center_img TARGET-IBD continues to collect valuable real-world data which enhances our understanding of the natural history of inflammatory bowel disease and the impact of different treatment paradigms on patient populations over time. The outcomes from real-world evidence can help doctors as they work to provide treatments to individual patients in real-life settings. This is particularly important given the ongoing innovation in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.” Source:https://www.targetpharmasolutions.com/news/target-pharmasolutionsr-announces-partnership-bristol-myers-squibb-advance-inflammatory-bowellast_img read more

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Naturebased antibiotic molecules for treatment of infections

first_img Source:https://benthamscience.com/ Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Jan 2 2019New developments in antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with antibiofilm properties are rapidly materializing. ABP works by inhibiting antibiotic resistant bacteria in the biofilm through nucleotide signaling molecules.Antimicrobial peptides and antibiofilm peptide (ABP) are new antibiotic molecules derived from microorganisms for the treatment of infections. The authors have discussed significance, limitations and trials of these antimicrobial peptides from bacteria, fungi, protozoa and yeast.Related StoriesNew methods to recognize antimicrobial resistant bacteria and how they workAntibiotic combination effective against drug-resistant PseudomonasCurved shape of bacteria can make it easier to find foodThese antimicrobial peptides are small, cationic and amphipathic polypeptide sequences with a wide range for Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, viruses and fungi with 6-100 amino acids in length. These sources are reviewed in detail showing characterization of these antimicrobial peptides and their respective classes.The APD3 database showed 333 bacteriocin and peptide antibiotics from bacteria, 4 from archaea, 8 from protists, 13 from fungi are reported. Bacterial AMP are characterized according to their amino acid numbers and are so small in size with 1-5 kDa mass as compared to Class II AMPs are longer with amino acid number is about 25-50.Class II bacteriocins are composed of homogeneous amino acids and classified into different groups based on their secondary structure. Class II Lactococcin produced by Lactococcus lactis is Lactococcin B. This AMP is involved in changes of membrane potential.The reported fungal AMP compounds are more than bacterial AMP and found to be a good source of antimicrobial compounds discovery against infections due to similarity in features and responses to infections.The in silico cDNA scanning method is widely used for determining the sequencing of Defensin like peptides and more than 100 AMP’s are revealed with the help of genome screening approaches.Fungal AMP’s Peptaibols isolated as secondary metabolites from possesses anti-microbial and anti-fungal activities. They have short amino acid chains.last_img read more

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Immune responses that prevent fungal infections may eliminate Trichinella spiralis

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Apr 18 2019Scientists from Lancaster University in the UK have discovered that immune responses originally found to prevent fungal infections are also important in eliminating Trichinella spiralis, a round worm and the causative agent of Trichinosis.People acquire trichinellosis by consuming raw or undercooked meat infected with theTrichinellaparasite, particularly wild game meat or pork.Consumption of contaminated meat contains “nurse cells” of the parasite. Once in the stomach the “nurse cells” hatch releasing infective larvae which then bury themselves within the lining of the small intestine.Previously immune responses to expel the parasite have been shown to rely on white blood cells called T-helper 2 cells, specialised for eliminating gastrointestinal parasites.However, scientists at Lancaster discovered that following this T-helper 2 response, a second T-helper 17 response, previously shown to be specialised for eliminating fungal infections and certain bacterial infections occurred.In collaboration with Professors Mark Travis and Richard Grencis from the University of Manchester, they were able to identify how these T-helper 17 cells arose and that they were key in maintaining the intestinal muscle contractions needed to flush out the worms.The findings have been published in the journal PLOS Pathogens and show that mice lacking the ability to activate a key signalling molecule important in producing T-helper 17 cells have a reduced ability to expel the parasite. Interestingly, they saw a delayed transit time in the small intestine hinting at alterations in muscle contraction. In isolating the small intestine they demonstrated that a key molecule produced from T-helper 17 cells, termed IL-17, could increase intestinal contraction and restoring levels of this IL-17 in their mice rescued their ability to expel the parasite.Dr John Worthington from the Department of Biomedical and Life Science at Lancaster led the research: “We were quite surprised by what we found during this study. Normally, these immune responses are thought of as acting quite distinctly depending on what type of infection you may have. It’s well established that the T-helper 2 response is beneficial during gastrointestinal worm infections, so traditionally any other response would be thought of as hindering worm expulsion. So, it was quite surprising to see that this late acting T-helper 17 response was actually beneficial to the mouse’s ability to resolve an infection and get rid of the worm.”Dr Worthington continues: “Our study provides novel insights into how the immune system interacts with muscle contraction during intestinal inflammation. Although the occurrence of this infection is very rare in the developed world, we hope it will help us to design new treatments for the many millions of people who suffer from intestinal parasitic infections worldwide and may even inform other intestinal diseases involving altered muscle function.” Source:https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/news/new-immune-pathway-involved-in-resistance-to-parasite-worms-found-in-undercooked-porklast_img read more

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CBOs report on singlepayer health care holds more questions than answers

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)May 1 2019Progressive Democrats have rallied around “Medicare-for-all,” a single-payer health plan popularized by Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.). Now, some of Washington’s official bean counters are trying to add a new framework around what it might look like. The picture they offer highlights just how complicated that shift might be.A report released Wednesday by the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office outlined a veritable laundry list of options and technicalities lawmakers would need to consider if they are serious about such a proposal.”The conversation about single-payer is getting more in the weeds, more detailed, which is a good thing because it’s such a complicated issue,” said Jodi Liu, an associate policy researcher at the Rand Corp. who studies single-payer proposals.The takeaway: There’s a lot left to be answered about the concepts of Medicare-for-all specifically and the more broad category of single-payer before policymakers and voters can come close to understanding what it would mean in practice. The term “single-payer” generally refers to a system in which health care is paid for by a single public authority.”Even single-payer systems around the globe vary from each other in many, many ways,” said John McDonough, a Harvard health policy professor who helped draft the Affordable Care Act. “There’s just so many aspects of it that differ from a Canada to a Sweden to a Taiwan — and those are all intensely consequential.”The report comes as this once-lefty pipe dream becomes officially mainstream.Medicare-for-all has been name-checked by Democrats running for president. On Tuesday, Democrats and Republicans alike put the proposal under the microscope at a House Rules Committee hearing. And that won’t be the last time that happens. House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Richard Neal (D-Mass.) said he, too, intends to hold a hearing on the issue this session. Meanwhile, Sanders’ latest Medicare-for-all bill, reintroduced in the Senate in April, and a similar House bill, have 14 and 108 co-sponsors, respectively.Let’s break down the most crucial issues raised by the CBO report — what single-payer might cover, why “what it would cost” isn’t easy to determine and what it could mean for how Americans get their health care.Medicare-for-all backers say the program would cover all medically necessary services. But what does that truly mean? What may seem obvious — the notion of medical necessity — isn’t so easy to distill into policy rules. And different single-payer systems around the world handle the benefits question differently, the CBO noted.For instance, Canada doesn’t cover prescription drugs, but the United Kingdom and Sweden do. Of those three, only Sweden fully covers long-term support services, according to the report.There are two questions at the heart of it, said Robert Berenson, a health policy analyst at the Urban Institute, a left-leaning think tank.What benefits would be covered? Would it include dental care or prescription drugs or vision, as Sanders’ bill would? And, how does one determine the discrete services included within those benefits categories?Single-payer architects could look at existing standards, such as the so-called essential health benefits that govern Obamacare health plans, to determine what’s covered. They could be more generous by including long-term care, which isn’t currently covered by Medicare or most private insurance plans.Even the two “Medicare-for-all” bills in Congress have slightly different takes. Though both provide for long-term support and services, they diverge on how to pay for it. Sanders’ bill covers only at-home long-term care and keeps Medicaid intact for services provided in institutions. The House bill by Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-Wash.) covers both.Related StoriesHuman contact plays major role in the spread of some hospital-acquired infectionsStudy estimates health care costs of uncontrolled asthma in the U.S. over next 20 yearsSupplements claiming to boost brain health are ‘too good to be true’, warn expertsAnd there are questions about new medical treatments, and how to determine whether they provide added value. The CBO report suggested some kind of “cost-effectiveness criterion” could determine what the government is willing to cover. In practice, though, that standard could be difficult to develop and fall victim to political lobbying or trigger contentious debate.Separately from the CBO report, McDonough noted, controversial medical services could bring up different kinds of political baggage — whether this plan would cover abortion, for instance, likely would change the single-payer debate.Next: Single-payer health care would probably require new taxes. Just what level of taxes, though, and whom they’d hit hardest remain open questions.Notably, the single-payer report avoids a question that critics frequently surface: How much would this cost? How would you pay for it?That’s because there’s no uniform cost estimate for single-payer and no easy formula to apply.For one thing, the price tag depends on what services are covered — something like long-term care would make the idea much more expensive.There’s also the question of cost sharing. In some single-payer systems, people must pay a copay, meet a deductible or pay a premium as part of the health plan. That would alleviate some need for new taxes.”I don’t think you can put numbers on it until someone defines a benefit package and defines cost sharing,” Berenson said.The current Medicare-for-all bills eschew cost sharing. Other health reform proposals would keep premiums intact to help foot some of the bill.The CBO report suggests that new taxes would likely play a role in financing a new single-payer plan. But what kind of taxes — a payroll tax, an income tax or a sales tax, for instance — has not yet been stipulated. And each would have different consequences.The single-payer approach could bring down health expenses, or at least increase value. But how effectively it would do so — and its larger economic impact — would depend on other design choices. Single-payer backers dismiss the “pay-for” questions because, the reasoning goes, this approach would save lots of money in other ways, ultimately making it a good deal.Yet again, though, the CBO said, whether that actually happens depends on the system’s design.By eliminating most private insurers, a single-payer system would likely slash hospitals’ administrative overhead. The government could then pay a rate that better reflects reduced hospital costs, according to the CBO report.But, ultimately, the single-payer bottom line depends on what the system pays hospitals, doctors and drug companies for different services and products. That answer also would inform other economic assessments — ascertaining, for instance, how single-payer affects a small town where the hospital is the main employer.Even without clear answers, outlining those questions moves the ball, Liu said.”This area is moving really fast,” she said. “To me, it seems like this is the beginning of a longer conversation.” This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente.last_img read more

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Faced with global warming aviation aims to turn green

A computer generated image of the hybrid-electric regional aircraft being developed by Zunum Aero, a start-up partly financed by US aeronautics group Boeing that could enter service as soon as in 2022. Explore further Norway aims for all short-haul flights 100% electric by 2040 Citation: Faced with global warming, aviation aims to turn green (2018, April 8) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-global-aviation-aims-green.html Will we someday be able to fly without the guilt of causing environmental damage? A handful of firms and regulators hope that the electric revolution in cars will also take to the skies, helping the industry cope with an expected boom in travel and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. “Many people say that we must get rid of air transport because we will never be able to deal with emissions and noise, but this is an outdated approach,” said Norwegian Transport Minister Ketil Solvik-Olsen, who recently hosted an aviation conference in Oslo.Norway, the largest oil and gas producer in western Europe, is paradoxically a pioneer in the field of electric transport. The Nordic nation aims for all new vehicle registrations to be zero emission by 2025 and launched a first electric ferry in early 2015.After land and water, the northern kingdom is now turning to the sky with the goal of electrifying all short haul flights in just over 20 years.”In my mind, there is no doubt: by 2040 Norway will be operating totally electric,” said Dag Falk-Petersen, head of the country’s public airport operator, Avinor. Tesla of the skies?Air transportation’s impact on global warming is estimated at around five percent through CO2 emissions and other substances, including nitrogen oxide and water vapour.As the number of air passengers is expected to almost double by 2036 to 7.8 billion per year, according to the International Air Transport Association’s (IATA) projections, aviation’s impact is on a course to increase substantially if nothing is done.Meanwhile, the airline industry aims to cut its CO2 emissions in half by 2050 from 2005 levels.While the international umbrella group Climate Action Network (CAN) says these goals are unrealistic, some airlines are beginning to look at electric-powered aircraft as an answer.The small regional carrier Wideroe Airlines, operating in Norway’s far north, plans to renew its fleet of twin-engine Bombardier Dash 8 planes with electric-powered aircraft by 2030. “Aircraft producers see that they have to do it because otherwise there will be a new Tesla taking their positions,” said Falk-Petersen, referring to how the upstart US electric car manufacturer has shaken up the traditional automobile industry. Both of the major manufacturers of large passenger aircraft, Airbus and Boeing, are exploring the viability of electric planes. “One of the biggest challenges is electricity storage,” Glenn Llewellyn, general manager for electrification at Airbus, told AFP. As with cars, the performance of batteries is a critical element, with the added problem that they are heavier than fuel and carrying them into the air is the most-energy intensive part of the flight.”But at the same time battery technology is probably the technology in the world which has the most investment. So it will evolve,” added Llewellyn.’Any place in the world’Zunum Aero, a start-up partly financed by US aeronautics group Boeing, meanwhile plans to bring a 12-seat hybrid plane to the market by 2022.”The price that we’re targeting is very much in line with the current aircraft but the operation cost is just a fraction, it’s literally 60 to 70 percent lower than an equivalent aircraft in operation right now,” said the startup’s founder Matt Knapp.The expected lower operating costs of electric planes, both due to cheap electricity and simpler motors, means that the highly competitive airline industry could end up adopting them quickly.Airbus offered several years ago updated aircraft with 15 percent fuel savings, and as jet fuel is a major cost for airlines, they quickly placed orders for thousands as they tried to get ahead of rivals.The transition to electric could also provide another advantage: they are much quieter, meaning they may win exceptions to restrictions imposed due to noise near residential areas.Combined with the fact that electric planes don’t need such long runways, they could be used at some smaller airports close to city centres.Avinor said switching to electric would also help airlines avoid any climate change related penalties that regulators could impose, such as higher taxes and flying restrictions.Norway sees itself as a good test bed for electric planes.”There are a lot of issues to deal with, with icy conditions, with heavy winds,” says Widero CEO Stein Nilsen. “But if we can do that here in Norway, I’m certain that this air plane will cope with any conditions in any place in the world.” © 2018 AFP Zunum Aero hopes that cheaper operating costs will entice airlines to go electric Airbus aims to develop a hybrid model called E-Fan X, and has teamed up with British engine maker Rolls Royce and German industrial group Siemens. The first flight is planned for 2020. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more

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Future cities could be lit by algae

Two molecules meet and produce light Citation: Future cities could be lit by algae (2018, May 3) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-05-future-cities-lit-algae.html The luciferase enzyme (yellow Pacman) becomes active at pH 6. It binds with luciferin (green wedge), transferring energy via oxidation, which is emitted as blue light. Credit: Signe Friis Schack, Allumen IVS Artist’s impression of a bioluminescent city lit by bioluminescent plants and algae. Credit: Signe Friis Schack, Allumen IVS Even though people have observed this phenomenon in the ocean for more than 2,500 years, we still know surprisingly little about the algae involved and how they produce light.The algae emit a blue light when they are shaken. Such as, when a predator swims by creating a current, or when the algae are hit by waves in coastal waters.Two molecules are particularly important for light production: Luciferase (an enzyme) and luciferin (a molecule produced by photosynthesis).When algae register a disturbance, a chain of cellular chemical processes is set in motion causing the pH to drop. This activates the luciferase enzymes, which bind to the luciferin and transfer energy to the luciferin via a process known as oxidation. It is the release of energy from luciferin we see as blue light.It has so far only been shown theoretically and not by experiment.Biological solar cell and living lamp in the same organismThe bioluminescent algae need energy to emit light, just like your bedside lamp that plugs into a power socket to access electricity. Algae though, get their energy from another source: The Sun.They use sunlight to produce energy via photosynthesis to carry out a whole range of processes at the cellular level.You can imagine algae as tiny individual lamps, powered by a solar cell. They ‘recharge’ during the day so they can emit their blue light throughout the night. Explore further The way we produce light has changed surprisingly little since Thomas Edison developed the first light bulb in 1879. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. There are a number of bioluminescent animals, fungi, and bacteria. All of them require food to produce energy needed to illuminate. Algae exploit sunlight and carbon dioxide (CO2): Two inexhaustible, environmentally friendly, CO2-neutral sources of energy.Sustainable cities with living lightWe use a large proportion of electricity to light our homes, roads, car parks and so on. This electricity largely comes from the burning of fossil fuels, which increases the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere and drives global warming. Therefore, we need a more sustainable source of light.Microalgae grow in saltwater, but as long as they grow in a closed container they can function as a biological lamp, which could be used as bulbs to illuminate our cities, shop windows, buildings, roads, and carparks.Bioluminescent algae are the first stage in the development of biological light, but there are some clear challenges when using algae in a lamp. Algae need to be disturbed into motion before they illuminate, which is problematic in a lamp. Moreover, they only illuminate for a relatively short period because of energy limitation.More research needed to develop bio-lampsTo produce biological lamps that can illuminate throughout the night without movement means that we need to think along entirely new lines.Right now, we are trying to figure out precisely which genes are used to emit light and then transfer these genes to other photosynthetic organisms to produce a bioluminescent plant that can emit light all night long.We are not there yet and it will take many years of research. But just imagine, stepping out into a city in the future bathed in a blue light produced by plants. Sea ice algae blooms in the dark The LED-bulb has recently reduced electricity costs significantly, but they still use the same power source and continue to contribute to global warming since most electricity still comes from burning fossil fuels.We need a new method to produce light that instead of using conventional electricity uses nature’s own energy.In the US a few dedicated researchers have been investigating bioluminescent algae for some years, but they have never successfully mapped the whole bioluminescent system within the algae. At the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), we are conducting the first Danish research in this area, and it shows that bioluminescent organisms could one day light up our cities in a turquoise blue light.There are however, some clear challenges to solve before this becomes a reality. We may need to transfer genes from bioluminescent organisms into other green organisms, perhaps higher plants that will be able to emit light more effectively.Microalgae illuminate the darkAlgae is found everywhere on land and in the sea, and are immensely important for life as we know it.Many people associate algae with seaweed (macroalgae), but in fact most algae are micro algae. These algae are so small that you can only see them through a microscope.Some of them, so-called dinoflagellates, emit a strong blue light at night. This phenomenon is known as bioluminescence, whereby living organisms produce light via chemical reactions.You can see it yourself at certain times of the year in warmer climates, around the equator from Brazil to Australia. Bioluminescent algae light up the dark. This bright blue light could illuminate cities in the future. Credit: Mikal Schlosser Provided by ScienceNordic This story is republished courtesy of ScienceNordic, the trusted source for English-language science news from the Nordic countries. Read the original story here. read more

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Simulation of the forces induced on cylinders by ocean currents could help

first_img Explore further Citation: Simulation of the forces induced on cylinders by ocean currents could help in the design of off-shore platforms (2018, November 1) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-11-simulation-cylinders-ocean-currents-off-shore.html When designing an off-shore platform, engineers must be able to predict how it will be affected by the motion of the surrounding sea water. As cylindrical structures such as heat exchangers, chimney stacks and riser pipes, are commonly deployed at the point where the platforms enter the ocean, it is vital to understand the forces exerted on them by flowing water under varying sea conditions.Water flowing around a single cylinder creates oscillating vortices—swirling currents of water. This so-called vortex shedding can cause vibrations in the structure. These typically reach a maximum amplitude when the flow velocity is such that the vortex-shedding oscillation frequency is near the structure’s natural mechanical frequency; this is also known as the lock-in frequency.However, in the case of multiple closely spaced cylinders, interactions between the flows around adjacent cylinders create vibrations as well. The influence of these wake-induced vibrations is poorly understood, and a coherent theory for them has not yet been developed.Now, Vinh-Tan Nguyen, Wai Hong Ronald Chan and Hoang Huy Nguyen from the A*STAR Institute of High Performance Computing have used a computational fluid dynamics approach to model wake-induced vibrations under various flow conditions.The team use a numerical model for fluid-structure interactions, which takes into account the coupled effects of vortices on structure responses and vice versa. They tested the reliability of their approach by comparing the numerical prediction with the results of two recent experimental studies. The agreement was reasonably good, and the simulation was able to predict the empirical observation that increased flow velocity leads to higher amplitude vibrations. Notably, unlike in the case of single cylinder, the response amplitude remains large as the flow velocity increases, even away from the lock-in frequency. This phenomenon is a concern for risers deployed in deep sea conditions in a tandem arrangement.”We are working on a better understanding of those phenomena from a more detailed fluid dynamic perspective,” says Vinh-Tan Nguyen. “Ultimately we would like to fully characterize this behaviour and provide an efficient tool for engineers to better design risers and offshore structures in those similar conditions.” More information: Vinh-Tan Nguyen et al. Numerical investigation of wake induced vibrations of cylinders in tandem arrangement at subcritical Reynolds numbers, Ocean Engineering (2018). DOI: 10.1016/j.oceaneng.2018.01.073 Provided by Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Computer simulation of vortex-induced motion improves offshore drill rig safety Modelling vortices in an ocean current around two cylinders could help marine-offshore engineers design better risers. Credit: A*STAR Institute of High Performance Computing A*STAR researchers have developed a model that can simulate the complicated forces exerted by flowing water on an array of cylinders supporting water-borne structures such as oil rigs. The work demonstrates the usefulness of numerical simulations to investigate complex physical real-world scenarios.last_img read more

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New material to push the boundaries of siliconbased electronics

first_imgScAlN is a piezoelectric semiconductor material with a high dielectric strength which is largely unexplored worldwide with regard of its usability in microelectronic applications. “The fact that scandium aluminum nitride is especially well suited for power electronic components, due to its physical properties, has already been proven,” explains Dr.-Ing. Michael Mikulla, project manager on the part of Fraunhofer IAF. The aim of the project is to grow lattice-matched ScAlN on a GaN layer and to use the resulting heterostructures to process transistors with high current carrying capacity. “Functional semiconductor structures based on materials with a large bandgap, such as scandium aluminum nitride and gallium nitride, allow for transistors with very high voltages and currents. These devices reach a higher power density per chip surface as well as higher switching speeds and higher operating temperatures. This is synonymous with lower switching losses, higher energy efficiency and more compact systems,” adds Prof. Dr. Oliver Ambacher, director of Fraunhofer IAF. “By combining both materials, GaN and ScAlN, we want to double the maximal possible output power of our devices while at the same time significantly lowering the energy demand,” says Mikulla. The electronics market is growing constantly and so is the demand for increasingly compact and efficient power electronic systems. The predominant electronic components based on silicon will in the foreseeable future no longer be able to meet the increasing industrial requirements. This is why scientists from the university of Freiburg, the Sustainability Center Freiburg and the Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft have joined forces in order to explore a new material structure that may be better suited for future power electronics. Explore further Citation: New material to push the boundaries of silicon-based electronics (2019, January 21) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-01-material-boundaries-silicon-based-electronics.html The recently launched project “Research of Functional Semiconductor Structures for Energy Efficient Power Electronics” (in short “Power Electronics 2020+”) researches the novel semiconductor material scandium aluminum nitride (ScAlN). Prof. Dr. Oliver Ambacher, director of Fraunhofer IAF and professor of power electronics at the Department of Sustainable Systems Engineering (INATECH) of the university of Freiburg, coordinates the supra-regional collaboration. Three key factors are responsible for the strong growth of the electronics market: the automation and digitalization of the industry as well as the increasing awareness of ecological responsibility and sustainable processes. Power consumption can only be lowered if electronic systems become more more energy- and resource-efficient the same time they become more powerful.Up to date, silicon dominates the electronics industry. With its relative low cost and an almost perfect crystal structure, silicon has become a particularly successful semiconductor material, also because its bandgap allows for both a good charge carrier concentration and velocity as well as a good dielectric strength. However, silicon electronics gradually reaches its physical limit. Especially with regard to the required power density and compactness, silicon power electronic components are insufficient.Innovative Material Composition for More Power and EfficiencyThe limitations of silicon technology have already been overcome by the use of gallium nitride (GaN) as a semiconductor in power electronics. GaN performs better in conditions of high voltages, high temperatures and fast switching frequencies compared to silicon. This goes hand in hand with significantly higher energy efficiency—with numerous energy-consuming applications, this means a significant reduction in energy consumption. Fraunhofer IAF has been researching GaN as a semiconductor material for electronic components and systems for many years. With the help of industrial partners, the results of these research work has already been put to commercial use. The scientists of the project “Power Electronics 2020+” will go even further in order to once more enhance the energy efficiency and durability of the next generation of electronic systems. For this purpose, a different and novel material will be used: scandium aluminum nitride (ScAlN). Pioneering Work in Materials ResearchOne of the biggest challenges of the project is crystal growth, considering that there exsist structure neither growth recipes nor empirical values for this material, yet. The project team needs to develop these during the next months in order to reach reproducible results and to produce layer structures that can successfully be used for power electronic applications.The research project will be conducted in close cooperation between the university of Freiburg, the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics IAF, the Sustainability Center Freiburg as well as the Fraunhofer Institure for Integrated Systems and Device Technology IISB in Erlangen, which is a member of the High-Performance Center for Electronic Systems in Erlangen. This new form of collaboration between university research and application-oriented development shall serve as a role model for future project cooperation. “On the one hand, this model facilitates the cooperation with companies through the prompt transfer of results from basic research to application-oriented development. On the other hand, it opens up synergies between two technically complementary Fraunhofer Centers from two different regions and thus improves both their offers for potential customers of the semiconductor industry,” says Prof. Ambacher. Credit: Hi-Res Images of Chemical Elementscenter_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Assessing the promise of gallium oxide as an ultrawide bandgap semiconductor Fraunhofer IAF develops electronic components and systems based on GaN. The image shows a processed GaN wafer. Credit: Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics IAF A team of researchers at Fraunhofer IAF has been working on the piezoelectric properties of ScAlN for the use in high-frequency filters for many years. The picture shows the characterization of such devices on a wafer. Credit: Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics IAF Provided by Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics IAFlast_img read more

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BMW to recall 360000 China cars over Takata airbags

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Germany’s BMW will recall 360,000 vehicles in China as part of the worldwide effort to root out defective airbags made by now-defunct Japanese supplier Takata, regulators in Beijing said. © 2019 AFP Around 20 people have died in accidents linked to defects in Takata airbags since 2013, prompting a massive worldwide recall of at least 100 million cars from a wide range of manufacturers.The recall will affect nearly 273,000 models built by BMW’s joint venture with Chinese manufacturer Brilliance Automotive and more than 87,000 imported BMW cars, China’s State Administration for Market Regulation said.The agency said in statement posted on its website late Tuesday that a defect could cause the airbags to eject debris at passengers if deployed. It did not mention any specific incidents caused by the BMW-installed airbags.The China recall affects more than two dozen different BMW models built between 2000 and 2018, including several each in the i, X and M series, along with other models.The suspect parts will be replaced for free, the notice said.Founded in 1933, Takata went out of business in 2017 because of the airbag crisis.The BMW announcement came as global carmakers were gathered for the Shanghai Auto Show amid a rare sales slump in the world’s largest vehicle market. The BMW announcement came as global carmakers were gathered for the Shanghai Auto Showcenter_img Tesla recalls 14,000 cars in China over Takata airbags Explore further Citation: BMW to recall 360,000 China cars over Takata airbags (2019, April 17) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-04-bmw-recall-china-cars-takata.htmllast_img read more